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Thread: R.I.P. Neil Peart

  1. #126
    Member StevegSr's Avatar
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    Now that the initial shock has worn off, deep feelings of loss and mourning set it. I'm sure that all prog fans will remember where they were and what they were doing when they heard of Neils' passing. Sadly, that's the mark of a great man.
    To be or not to be? That is the point. - Harry Nilsson.

  2. #127
    I think this one hit me in the gut more than any other celebrity death during my life. More than when other prog luminaries such as Squire, Emerson, Lake, and Wetton all passed a few years ago. More than when Jerry Garcia died a quarter-century ago. More than John Lennon's murder, which took place when I was ten years old and barely even aware of who he was. Even though as an adult I've likely spent a lot more time listening to those artists than I've spent listening to Rush, the music of Rush and the lyrics of Neil Peart were more vital to me than anything during those formative early teen years. It's a time in our lives when we first engage with art, ideas, and interpersonal relations on anything approaching an adult level. It can also feel like a traumatic time for some of us, where we awkwardly struggle to fit in, to be "cool", to be accepted, and sometimes fail miserably at it.

    I was a shy, fat kid, often bullied or ridiculed. I had already discovered rock music, and had gone through phases of increasingly engaged fandom with the Rolling Stones, the Who, and Led Zeppelin, in that order. But that was all music that cooler, older kids might listen to; "sex, drugs, rock and roll" is a meaningless slogan to an alienated 12 year-old, and even anthems about pinball wizards or ladies buying stairways to heaven failed to connect with me on a personal level.

    But discovering Rush was different. Whether explicitly or implicitly, Neil's lyrics seemed to convey the message that it's not only ok to be different, to stand apart from the crowd, to follow your own path even at great cost: it can be heroic. Those weird early epics - "The Fountain of Lamneth" and "2112" - spoke to me. These were tales of lone individuals struggling to achieve something in a world of mediocrity, a world that seemed indifferent at best and hostile at worst. That message spoke to me, and I liked it even better distilled into the mature and more realistic, yet breathtaking lyricism of their most recent (at the time) albums, Permanent Waves, Moving Pictures, and Signals, a trifecta that I still consider the band's absolute zenith. Neil's words were delivered with impassioned vocals and carried along by this music that I found complex and virtuosic (an impression to which his own jaw-dropping percussion was no small contributor), yet soaring and melodic at the same time. Put it all together, and somehow this band seemed to emblemize freedom, integrity, and hope. To a kid who had never dared to consider himself anything more than a hopeless loser, Rush was a lifeline and a lodestar.

    I grew up, of course, and discovered "a wider reality", to quote one of Neil's lyrics. I maintained my Rush fandom, though they would never mean nearly as much to me as they did during those formative years. But I really do feel like part of my childhood died this week.

  3. #128
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    Not what I was expecting to see when I got up this morning (a windstorm kept me offline yesterday afternoon/evening). Shocking and sad news for this long-time fan. Rest in peace, Neil. Your music will live on.
    if you want money for people with minds that hate, all I can tell you is brother you have to wait

  4. #129
    Well said, Olias.

    I'm shocked, pissed, depressed, and spent/spending a good deal of time shedding tears. I guess Neil didn't get the memo that heroes aren't supposed to die.

    Just last week a good friend that wasn't really ever much into Rush had watched Beyond the Lighted Stage, and was not only impressed with the music he'd been missing, but with them as people. He was particularly enamored with Neil, with his talents and tragedies. I'd offered to lend him Ghost Rider and Roadshow, so they've been sitting out in view waiting for me to deliver them to him. Then this happened.

    I'm going to go put my fist through something.

  5. #130
    Member dropforge's Avatar
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    Triumph's Gil Moore on Fellow Toronto Native Neil Peart: 'A Private, Gentle Soul'

    https://www.billboard.com/articles/c...eil-peart-rush

  6. #131
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    This hurts as much as the loss of both Keith Emerson and Chris Squire.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  7. #132
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Neil Peart in his own words: Growing up in St. Catharines

    https://www.stcatharinesstandard.ca/...st-catharines/

  8. #133
    I have been in tears more or less all day. It's like a piece of my youth died yesterday. But then I listen to the music, and I realize it is still alive.

    The quality of the comments is simply stunning - in the emotional, and the musical sense. And they reveal a common theme, one of comfort and guidance during teenage angst. Mine is also the same story: I had no intellectual interests whatsoever, and my only escape from the troubles of growing into a sick, social environment was rock music. And then, I discovered Rush - and Neil's lyrics was the first proper food for thought that entered my head. Suddenly it was cool for me to be a thinker, to read books, to make an effort to grow intellectually as a person.

    So leaving aside any discussion on the musical merits of the man - he's a fucking monster on the drums, we all know that - his most significant contribution is his ability to communicate deep meanings in a simple manner, and in the context of a song. I believe his style is unique in rock literature. Simple, clear cut, and deeply humane.

    Fare thee well Neil! You've been an example and inspiration for so many people. You have done well.

  9. #134
    Member dropforge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    This hurts as much as the loss of both Keith Emerson and Chris Squire.
    Plus, for me, Edgar Froese, Ronnie Dio and John Wetton.

    But especially Edgar.

  10. #135
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
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    How completely true to who they were as friends that Alex and Geddy were able to give so many interviews since 2015 and be completely poker-faced about all this.

    I think perhaps Neil's greatest legacy will be the countless number of kids who took up drumming after hearing him.

    RIP.
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  11. #136
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    All of us in Far Corner are big Rush fans. Rush was my gateway to progressive rock, but more specifically, it was Neil's drumming which really drew me in. He's one of my biggest musical heroes, and my music would be much different today without his influence.
    Dan Maske

  12. #137
    Saw Rush three times at the Glasgow Apollo and they were never less than stellar. And after the gig they'd stand and sign programmes and you really felt they appreciated you having come to the gig.

  13. #138
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    This one gets me choked up every single time. Just amazing.

    Prog, Metal and Classic rock reviews/interviews - www.velvetthunder.co.uk

  14. #139
    Member jarmsuh's Avatar
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    A week ago I was thinking about how I would react to the death of one of Rush members. Today I live it for real. And I am more affected that I have imagine.

  15. #140
    My wife and I just frequented a grocery store that we haven't been to in ages. Hadn't seen this before, but there was NO WAY I was going to pass it up.

    Cheers to Neil.
    15787758645080.jpg

  16. #141
    Quote Originally Posted by Paulrus View Post
    How completely true to who they were as friends that Alex and Geddy were able to give so many interviews since 2015 and be completely poker-faced about all this.
    I was thinking the same thing. Both of them out there in the public, especially Geddy doing his book tour. And all along they had a secret they couldn't tell us until we had to find out for ourselves... "Open Secrets" ??
    "Moustache stays right where it's at" - Clutch

  17. #142
    Member dgtlman's Avatar
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    Folks, this is yet another reminder to get out & see as many shows as you can before the classics are gone forever. My brother & I have had this conversation many times. The big question being: "What is going to out there in 10 years?"
    The 40 or so times I saw Rush, going back to 1976, I will cherish those memories even more now & am extremely thankful for those events. Heck, I wish I had seen even MORE!!!
    RIP Pratt!

  18. #143
    I listen to a lot of music, progressive and otherwise. Yet throughout all those past decades of listening and being enthusiastic about many of the musicians, Neil is the only musician I'd ever written a fan letter to, shortly after I saw the New World Tour in 1982. I probably gushed on and on about the band and their talents and embarrassed him. I adore Geddy and Alex too (Geddy is why I taught myself the bass guitar), so I'm not sure why it is that I picked out Neil to send a letter to, but if memory serves it revolved around Countdown, which blew me away in concert. A rock band writing about the Shuttle was mind blowing to me and it hooked me hard.

    I'd recently picked up Wandering the Face of the Earth, and it was neat to see that particular concert listed in there. Will be a fun book to read, I think.

  19. #144
    Member mnprogger's Avatar
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    wtf Brain Cancer

    Marie Fredrikson of Roxette just passed away from it as well a few months ago.

    I just found this on Wiki, and am pretty surprised to see so many with Brain conditions, thankfully not all have died though
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...h_brain_tumors

  20. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    This one gets me choked up every single time. Just amazing.

    Thanks for sharing that. I've never seen this before.

  21. #146
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rael View Post
    Thanks for sharing that. I've never seen this before.
    What I really love about it is that it shows just how wrong so many established critics and journalists were for all those years. You can't fake enthusiasm like that. Phony cheering when the 'applause' sign goes on does not sound like that did. The boys deserved every moment of that love and praise.
    Prog, Metal and Classic rock reviews/interviews - www.velvetthunder.co.uk

  22. #147
    Member dropforge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    This one gets me choked up every single time. Just amazing.

    If I could "like" that post...done.

  23. #148
    Member dropforge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    What I really love about it is that it shows just how wrong so many established critics and journalists were for all those years. You can't fake enthusiasm like that. Phony cheering when the 'applause' sign goes on does not sound like that did. The boys deserved every moment of that love and praise.
    Damn straight.

  24. #149
    Member bill g's Avatar
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    😫 My wife and I, on our honeymoon, just now heard this. Listening to Rush this afternoon loudly on our lanai in honor.

  25. #150
    I've been pretty much a hot mess since I heard this yesterday. Trying to forget the real world and watch a stupid football game and they played Limelight and the tears started flowing again.

    This wasn't seen by us on the outside and that makes it harder to deal with. I know Terry Jones has dementia and is gonna pass from that. I'm expecting that news and it will suck but there's time to prepare for it. It's still hard to process.

    Prayers for his family and friends. Wish he had had more time with them in retirement.
    Carry On My Blood-Ejaculating Son - JKL2000

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