Page 11 of 14 FirstFirst 1234567891011121314 LastLast
Results 251 to 275 of 343

Thread: R.I.P. Neil Peart

  1. #251
    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Southwest
    Posts
    1,065
    Yup; its the place to start.
    They are all very worthwhile.

    I have them all except for Travelling Music. But I just ordered that to complete my collection.

    In many ways, his least-known book is my favorite. It was his first. It covers his bicycle tour in Africa.

  2. #252
    Member dropforge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    1,721
    ^The Masked Rider.

  3. #253
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    186
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    And again, IMO, he didnít aspire to be. Who took lessons from other drummers, even when they were hugely famous?? NOT Carl, to the best of my knowledge.
    Actually I believe he did study with a teacher during the break after BSS - maybe a classical percussionist?

  4. #254
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    Who took lessons from other drummers, even when they were hugely famous??
    Ginger Baker did.
    Orange is the new stupid.

  5. #255
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    3,661
    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    I liked it too but it's heartwrenching.
    Agree, considering everything he went through, parts of it are tough to read.

  6. #256
    I wish I could 'like' so many of the posts here. It's a wonderful commiserative gathering of serious music fans who have all been touched in some way by his life's work.

    With Neil's death, Rush is now done with absolute certainty, and I'm sure many have been reflecting on their legacy as a whole. One thing I appreciate is that they never allowed themselves to become an oldies act. Not to pick on Yes, but let's face it, they may as well be the Beach Boys or the Four Seasons. They'll trot out a cursory tune from their latest album if there even is one, but basically a post-Rabin Yes show is little more than a '70s nostalgia fest (and 50%+ is likely culled from their remarkable 3-album run in '71-'72). A latter-day Rush show, on the other hand, would always emphasize their latest album, with a generous helping of tracks from the 2-3 that preceded it. Sure, they had their evergreens (Tom Sawyer, Spirit of Radio), and would often revive songs from older albums (Digital Man, Entre Nous), but anyone expecting mostly a rehash of Exit...Stage Left would be sorely disappointed. As long as Rush existed, I don't think they ever stopped thinking of themselves as active, contemporary artists. That doesn't describe an awful lot of rock stars in their later years.

  7. #257
    Quote Originally Posted by taliesin View Post
    Actually I believe he did study with a teacher during the break after BSS - maybe a classical percussionist?
    Carl Palmer studied classical timpani at the Guildhall School of Music in London in 1973. Before BSS was recorded, I think. It's covered in The Manticore Special they put out, which you can find on YouTube.

  8. #258
    Member dropforge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    1,721
    Quote Originally Posted by olias View Post
    I wish I could 'like' so many of the posts here. It's a wonderful commiserative gathering of serious music fans who have all been touched in some way by his life's work.

    With Neil's death, Rush is now done with absolute certainty, and I'm sure many have been reflecting on their legacy as a whole. One thing I appreciate is that they never allowed themselves to become an oldies act. Not to pick on Yes, but let's face it, they may as well be the Beach Boys or the Four Seasons. They'll trot out a cursory tune from their latest album if there even is one, but basically a post-Rabin Yes show is little more than a '70s nostalgia fest (and 50%+ is likely culled from their remarkable 3-album run in '71-'72). A latter-day Rush show, on the other hand, would always emphasize their latest album, with a generous helping of tracks from the 2-3 that preceded it. Sure, they had their evergreens (Tom Sawyer, Spirit of Radio), and would often revive songs from older albums (Digital Man, Entre Nous), but anyone expecting mostly a rehash of Exit...Stage Left would be sorely disappointed. As long as Rush existed, I don't think they ever stopped thinking of themselves as active, contemporary artists. That doesn't describe an awful lot of rock stars in their later years.
    So true, and I'd certainly 'like' your post if I could.

  9. #259
    Member Kcrimso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Espoo, Finland
    Posts
    888
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    I like Carl too, but he isn’t and, IMO, never was, on Neil’s level. Again, IMO.

    And again, IMO, he didn’t aspire to be. Who took lessons from other drummers, even when they were hugely famous?? NOT Carl, to the best of my knowledge.
    Palmer took perkussion lessons at very high level at the time of Brains Salad Surgery.

    Edit. Ah, Olias mentioned it already.
    "A waste of talent and electricity." John Peel on ELP

  10. #260
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Sussex, England.
    Posts
    1,275
    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotron View Post
    Yup; its the place to start.
    They are all very worthwhile.

    I have them all except for Travelling Music. But I just ordered that to complete my collection.

    In many ways, his least-known book is my favorite. It was his first. It covers his bicycle tour in Africa.
    Yep, The Masked Rider is excellent, nothing about music or Rush just an amazing travelogue. My others faves are Travelling Music, Ghost Rider and the last one he did Far and Wide which documents the final Rush tour - essential reading.

  11. #261
    Member lazland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wales
    Posts
    125
    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    So true, and I'd certainly 'like' your post if I could.
    Yes, this was an excellent post and point extremely well made.

  12. #262
    Carl's handler have let him down. -1 for his manager.
    "Always ready with the ray of sunshine"

  13. #263
    In my sadness, I am learning to play the Garden on acoustic Guitar. Sort of a way to grieve and not appear to be grieving. The problem is, I cant get through the song without tearing up. It will be a while before I can attempt to play this in the public domain. Perhaps that's the intent of the song - beautiful in every respect. That song is a lament, and it still hits home.
    I got nothin'

    ...avoiding any implication that I have ever entertained a cognizant thought.

    live samples:
    https://soundcloud.com/yodelgoat/yod...om-a-live-show
    https://www.facebook.com/pg/PapaYode...=page_internal

  14. #264
    Proud Member since 2/2002 UnderAGlassMoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    166
    Iíve had The Garden in my head for 3 days.

  15. #265
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    southern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,943
    That's a tough one to get through. Available Light, too. I'm noticing so many little moments in listening back to all these songs that are very moving. The bridge in Good News First really hit me ("...some would say they never fear a thing, well I do...") just now.
    Prog, Metal and Classic rock reviews/interviews - www.velvetthunder.co.uk

  16. #266
    Quote Originally Posted by UnderAGlassMoon View Post
    I’ve had The Garden in my head for 3 days.
    It's been "Entre Nous" for me.
    Probably my favorite Rush tune, that.

  17. #267
    Member oilersfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kansas, USA
    Posts
    272
    From those that I have read thus far, this is among my favorite tributes to Neil. Too lengthy to copy/paste here so follow the link below. And, please, don't let the name of the site stop you from reading this very thoughtfully written piece.

    https://bleedingheartlibertarians.co...eart-and-rush/
    Last edited by oilersfan; 4 Days Ago at 02:18 PM.

  18. #268
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Waterloo, IA, USA
    Posts
    596
    ^^^
    Thanks for sharing. Well written, indeed.
    David
    Happy with what I have to be happy with.

  19. #269
    Well-written but not always right..
    The high-brow stuff was more associated with the urban elite, and certainly the rock press, while the lower-brow stuff was clearly working class, though often beloved in a somewhat condescending way by the rock press, usually for its ďauthenticity.Ē
    Bill Martin would classify the latter as "the blues orthodoxy," which is what he claimed the rock press adored. Not the "elite." In fact, they generally hated the elite, which is where they put prog rock.

    But the obit itself was a nice read and heartfelt.
    I'm not lazy. I just work so fast I'm always done.

  20. #270
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Philadelphia Area
    Posts
    1,084
    One thing I will say about RUSH as far as I'm concerned is that it doesn't matter if you only liked some of their music or all of it, they gave everything they had of themselves on every album for their fans and I always respected that. I can't say that about a lot of other acts through the years.

    RIP Neil you will be sorely missed and thanks for all the great music which I will listen to for the rest of my lifetime.

  21. #271
    Quote Originally Posted by oilersfan View Post
    From those that I have read thus far, this is among my favorite tributes to Neil. Too lengthy to copy/paste here so follow the link below. And, please, don't let the name of the site stop you from reading this very thoughtfully written piece.

    https://bleedingheartlibertarians.co...eart-and-rush/
    This^ ������
    I got nothin'

    ...avoiding any implication that I have ever entertained a cognizant thought.

    live samples:
    https://soundcloud.com/yodelgoat/yod...om-a-live-show
    https://www.facebook.com/pg/PapaYode...=page_internal

  22. #272
    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Southwest
    Posts
    1,065
    Quote Originally Posted by oilersfan View Post
    From those that I have read thus far, this is among my favorite tributes to Neil. Too lengthy to copy/paste here so follow the link below. And, please, don't let the name of the site stop you from reading this very thoughtfully written piece.

    https://bleedingheartlibertarians.co...eart-and-rush/
    Yes, very good. Thank you!

  23. #273
    Moderator Sean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,568
    I enjoy reading the tributes and Neil's own words but I really don't care to listen to their music anymore and haven't for a few years now. I won't change the station if they come on, but I have a huge feeling of "been there, done that".

  24. #274
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Portland, OR, USA
    Posts
    1,472
    Quote Originally Posted by Dana5140 View Post
    Well-written but not always right..
    "The high-brow stuff was more associated with the urban elite, and certainly the rock press, while the lower-brow stuff was clearly working class, though often beloved in a somewhat condescending way by the rock press, usually for its 'authenticity.'"
    Bill Martin would classify the latter as "the blues orthodoxy," which is what he claimed the rock press adored. Not the "elite." In fact, they generally hated the elite, which is where they put prog rock.
    But the obit itself was a nice read and heartfelt.
    He's lumping rootsy, "authentic" music, like Dylan, with art-school music like Bowie (and prog); then setting them against working-class music like Aerosmith. They're really three different things. Critics loved "authentic" music, usually disliked self-consciously arty stuff, and ignored Aerosmith et al as much as they could, because they were playing blue-collar music, but it wasn't what those critics thought blue-collar music should be. (Bruuuce is what they thought blue-collar music should be.)

    That author also said, "there’s a great Gender Studies thesis/dissertation to be written about Rush and masculinity." As well as, presumably, a treatment of just why women famously didn't like them. I have some theories on the matter, but they'd probably get me in hot water if I voiced them; I will observe, though, that Rush were one of the least sexy major bands around - no love songs, no sex-machine rhythms, no presenting themselves as sex objects a la Mick, Robert, Roger, or Rod.
    Also, the singer was:
    A. Stuck playing bass and keyboards rather than owning the stage,
    B. Had a voice that was just strange and yelping rather than Robert Plant's soul falsetto,
    C. The homeliest guy in the band, with a jutting chin and a big nose.
    Last edited by Baribrotzer; 4 Days Ago at 07:10 PM.

  25. #275
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    southern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,943
    I re-watched the Time Stand Still documentary, and I'll tell ya, that's an emotional one. It already was, but knowing now that shortly after it was filmed and they played that last show, that Neil was diagnosed... it just flattened me. The cruel unfairness of life.
    Prog, Metal and Classic rock reviews/interviews - www.velvetthunder.co.uk

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •