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Thread: Canterbury Binge MMXX

  1. #101
    There's a Swedish band called Testbild! and they released an album in 2018 called "Stad" that's very much in the Canterbury vein. It's a killer album that's both proggy and poppy, with Hammond, Rhodes, Moog, Mellotron, saxophone, etc. Sadly, the album went unnoticed. It was never released on CD and had a micro-press on LP of only 99 copies, which I grabbed before they sold out. I think many people on this forum will enjoy it. Check it out:

    https://kalligrammofon.bandcamp.com/album/stad

  2. #102
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Nice stuff, Katondepena. All four members "sång" though which is a bit too much sånging for my tastes.

  3. #103
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    I was surprised how long they've been around. Lots of releases, most of which are dirt cheap on Discogs.
    "If you want to see the true nature of humanity, just look at the internet."

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  4. #104
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Do not confuse with Din A Testbild.

  5. #105
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Do not confuse with Din A Testbild.
    No, this lot here:

    https://www.discogs.com/artist/230040-Testbild!
    "If you want to see the true nature of humanity, just look at the internet."

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  6. #106
    They’ve been around for a while. From what I sampled from previous albums, they sounded different compared to the latest one, but I need to spend more time with them.

  7. #107

  8. #108
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    I've made the argument before that I can't consider Rock Bottom as a Canterbury record, or even a progressive rock record or whatever. Its artistic scope transcends completely any discussion about musical form or genre. I would say the same for only a handful of records (like Zeit, or Trout Mask or Bitches Brew).

    I've been listening to this record for 15 or so years on a regular basis. I've loved it immediately, but I am not ashamed to say that I don't understand it not a bit. I always come in front of it like a caveman in front of a spaceship - full of admiration and ignorance. But it does move me in ways that are hard to describe.
    Thought provoking observations

  9. #109
    Wow just having any Canterbury preconceptions blown away .....check out Endless Way From You
    by The Worm Ouroboros

    http://thewormouroboros.bandcamp.com...n8F5LqLbK5VCcU

    its very good

  10. #110
    Member thedunno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prestonplatform View Post
    Wow just having any Canterbury preconceptions blown away .....check out Endless Way From You
    by The Worm Ouroboros

    http://thewormouroboros.bandcamp.com...n8F5LqLbK5VCcU

    its very good
    It is probably my favorite retro prog release for a long time. For me better then Big big train, the Flower Kings, Jordso and even All traps on Earth.

    However, I am reluctant to call it Canterbury although at times there is certainly a bit of a Caravan vibe going on. Its more vintage retro prog. Fresh, energetic and great musicianship.

    Get this album!

  11. #111
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Today starts my COW-A-THON. Are they really Canterbury? Not sure but today they are
    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

  12. #112
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Are they really Canterbury?
    Only Leg End and the earlier recordings, IMO. By the time of "Ruins" (from Unrest) they had no parallel or 'genre' to adhere to. And even the debut breaks away in spades, although there's the odd moment where you'd swear about an echo from Hatfield. Distantly.

    HC were too overtly radical, intellectual and, frankly, untypical - of anything. Like Magma, they became a 'genre' unto themselves. And indeed they did.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  13. #113
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    HC were too overtly radical, intellectual and, frankly, untypical - of anything. Like Magma, they became a 'genre' unto themselves. And indeed they did.
    When the Magma book comes out with all the 'shagging' tales, I hope someone will translate it for me!
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    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  14. #114
    ^ There'll probably even be fistfighting and vomiting in that one.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  15. #115

  16. #116
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Only Leg End and the earlier recordings, IMO. By the time of "Ruins" (from Unrest) they had no parallel or 'genre' to adhere to. And even the debut breaks away in spades, although there's the odd moment where you'd swear about an echo from Hatfield. Distantly.

    HC were too overtly radical, intellectual and, frankly, untypical - of anything. Like Magma, they became a 'genre' unto themselves. And indeed they did.
    Man I am digging this Cow-a-thon! There is nothing that I would rather hear at the moment - and right now they are the greatest band of all time

    I'm playing each album multiple times and I've done Leg End and Unrest. Both are just so different and just monstrous in their own way. Leg End is true perfection though. Looking forward to the rest. "Amygdala" is one of the greatest tunes I've ever heard.
    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

  17. #117
    ^ Amygdala was the first HCow song I ever heard, and it was thanks to Richard posting it in the Canterbury Binge 2016/2017 thread.

  18. #118
    ^ "Amygdala" was a revelation of a tune when I first heard it back in '93. I was 22 1/2 and was basically convinced that I'd heard it all. But this piece took the intricacies, sophistication and sheer melodic richness of a Zappa or even a juvenile Messiaen and effectively translated it into the densest seven minutes I'd ever taken in by a "rock" group. I could listen to it again and again and just marvel at the pure cornucopia of ideas and the thoughts that may or may not have spurred them. I mean, the performance itself is stellar - but the composition of it! The act of creating something like that, when you're essentially still in a youngster quintet of longhairs…

    I still love it.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  19. #119
    A discussion I had with Tim H about "Amygdala" (2005). He's evidently less of a fan of the piece than some of us are...

    Q: re: "Amygdala", I think you now consider this the absolute antithesis to what you're trying to do nowadays, but I have to ask : was this written as a challenge to cram as much musical content as possible, with as little repetition as possible, into 7 minutes of music ?

    TH: No, not at all. It depends what you call musical content, but the way I thought of it, the musical content was extremely limited - just a kind of melodic shape with some accompanying chords and a few figures derived from this: all it had to do was to appear in constantly varied forms. But my composing technique wasn't developed enough to develop the shape of the whole piece out of this musical content, so I relied on everything that wasn't part of the content - i.e. dynamics, timbre, speed and general suggestions to Chris about how to approach the percussion in each bit - to get the shape of the whole piece.

    Q: Jazz musicians would probably call this a great waste of ideas - they would have used each segment as a basis for separate improvisations... It is my impression that your writing at the time (the other striking example being "Living In The Heart...") personified Henry Cow's unique approach to written v/s improvised music : totally structured, incredibly dense compositions v/s total improv. Did you favour that approach more than anybody else in the group (there was a little more improv in Fred and John's pieces) ?

    TH: Yes, I think so. I was following the ideal of total composition, where every detail had a reason within a known structure or process. But sometimes of course I got in a fix and did things that had no reason, just to be able to go on. There was an idea of 'objective truth' in this, that I needed to put objective truth in front of people and that this would in some way counter the dishonesty of the social and economic system. At the same time I felt that the music had to be suffused with a kind of dynamising emotion. I didn't get near that with "Amygdala", but with the later pieces I got a bit nearer.
    Talking of jazz, "Amygdala" really fails to break the material completely down into individual notes because a lot of it is predicated on the melody-chords-bassline pattern of jazz. My approach was still pretty primitive and if I sat at a keyboard my left hand would play chords and my right would play tunes. I could get several tunes going at once but I was always slow to get rid of the chords completely, and you can hear them in much of "Amygdala" if you listen out.
    Calyx (Canterbury Scene) - http://www.calyx-canterbury.fr
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    Upcoming prog (& beyond) shows in France - http://www.bigbangmag.com/agenda.php

  20. #120
    ^ Thx so much for this, Aymeric!

    The thing about Tim H., I sincerely think, is that he continuously argues from the viewpoint of a trained musician and/or composer/improvisor. I remember a similar assessment from Lindsay Cooper regarding her (entire side 2) contribution to Western Culture; that her compositional expertise and hold on formal music theory somehow wasn't "developed enough" or even "primitive". Of course, by these standards even a VdGG or a GGiant would be floppy amateurs and wannabes.

    Which was one of the assets that made the greatness of Henry Cow and far less "developed" approaches within progressive rock; the strive to accomplish beyond oneself. For better or worse.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  21. #121
    Member StarThrower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    ^ Amygdala was the first HCow song I ever heard, and it was thanks to Richard posting it in the Canterbury Binge 2016/2017 thread.
    A great piece to listen to with headphones. I finally bought a good pair of Sennheiser's so I've been trying out different stuff.

  22. #122
    Member TheH's Avatar
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    Canterbury in the base but also Chamber Prog, minimalistic Avant etc.

    John Ghost from Belgium (where else?)


  23. #123
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    It finally stopped snowing after about 24 hours! It finally looks like 'Canterbury January' to me out there. Beginning this Sunday's listening with Kevin Ayers' Joy Of A Toy, a fun, oddball album that I've always really liked, if perhaps mostly linked to the Canterbury genre by the cast of players rather than the overall sound. But it's a great one IMO!
    Prog, Metal and Classic rock reviews/interviews - www.velvetthunder.co.uk

  24. #124
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    ^First album I heard of his and still my favourite. A lot of period charm on it.

  25. #125
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    It finally stopped snowing after about 24 hours! It finally looks like 'Canterbury January' to me out there. Beginning this Sunday's listening with Kevin Ayers' Joy Of A Toy, a fun, oddball album that I've always really liked, if perhaps mostly linked to the Canterbury genre by the cast of players rather than the overall sound. But it's a great one IMO!
    Yeah baby - it's white here in the Hudson Valley too! I guess we will always associate Canterbury music with it being white outside, eh? Hopefully climate change doesn't fuck that up too much. So this was posted at the Cow thread but its too damn good to be just buried in there, so this is a must check out......

    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

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