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Thread: Avant Symphonic Jazz Rock that will BLOW YOUR MIND

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sputnik View Post
    I bought one on Amazon for about $30 after sampling it here. The only copy still available there is going for $1,354.99, LOL!

    Bill
    Good album but I think Iíll save my $1354.99 for more reasonable use. [emoji23]


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  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER View Post
    as for the Magma reference, I am not a big Magma fan... way too repetitive for my taste.
    Repetition in Magma's music appears as mere dynamic means to unified ends, and is always fleshed out with detailed additions - their formula was never "repetitive" as such or in the sense that I hear much other 70s progressive rock, where repetition served duration and apparently little in terms of integral compositional intent.

    As for this thing you've posted, I thought it was solid enough. Good growl too.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  3. #53
    Member Since: 3/27/2002 MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER's Avatar
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    crazy how music is such a personal thing. 'One man's treasure'... and all that

    the Shimakawa album is very fresh sounding to me (aside from ol' Cookie on the last track) with no immediate "oh he's just taking thisandthat to another level". I dont hear Magma and the Hamasyan, while very good, is way more in the Jazz realm than the Shimakawa and the Meinl Cymbals - GEM project is WAY too strict with every note in its place for me. Other comparisons made in this thread are not exactly accurate either.

    The Shimakawa album hits all the right spots for me, unlike any of the artists listed in this thread that are supposedly similar

    and that's how music works and should work...
    Last edited by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER; 01-06-2020 at 01:09 PM.
    Why is it whenever someone mentions an artist that was clearly progressive (yet not the Symph weenie definition of Prog) do certain people feel compelled to snort "thats not Prog" like a whiny 5th grader?

  4. #54
    Member rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kilgore Trout View Post
    The fact that a lot of you are making it about tastes is a blatant display of intellectual dishonesty (and let's not talk about the "Inoculation" nonsense), and I don't want to say anything more about this.
    Let's hope not. Because it is *all* about taste.

  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    I didn't hear any Magma, but it reminded me a lot of Tigran Hamasyans most electric album - Red Hail (2008)
    Same rythm patterns, chords, lines, vocals and furious energy[/video]
    This Hamasyan record is a killer. He's remarkable, as he does everything from Armenian folk music as the source for some of his music, to atmospherics with Jan Bang and Eivind Aarset on one of his ECM recordings (the other is totally different). And then there's this...another great record. I saw him as Artist in Residence at the Montreal Jazz Fest a few years back and he did some music along this line, along with other stuff that was more avant-leaning.

    Definitely an artist worth keeping your eye on, as you may not like a particular new release...but you might find yourself totally LOVING the next one!
    John Kelman
    Senior Contributor, All About Jazz since 2004
    Freelance writer/photographer

  6. #56
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkelman View Post
    This Hamasyan record is a killer. He's remarkable, as he does everything from Armenian folk music as the source for some of his music, to atmospherics with Jan Bang and Eivind Aarset on one of his ECM recordings (the other is totally different). And then there's this...another great record. I saw him as Artist in Residence at the Montreal Jazz Fest a few years back and he did some music along this line, along with other stuff that was more avant-leaning.

    Definitely an artist worth keeping your eye on, as you may not like a particular new release...but you might find yourself totally LOVING the next one!

    Mmhhh!!!... I'm not up to everything he did so far, but I do have Red Hail, Shadow and Mockroot, which seem to be his trilogy (or serie of zeuhlish 1-2-3 punches in the jaw) with Wood and Minae (respectively drums and bass)
    I didn't like A Fable (mostlu solo piano, if memory serves), and TBH, I've stopped paying attention after his two ECM albums.

    In the middle of that trilogy, he had done an excellent collab in another fave world jazz album of mine ABU NAWAS RHAPSODY from Dhafer YOUSSEF (Tunisia, but affiliated to the French jazz scene like Tigran and Maalouf and Naissam Jalal)
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  7. #57
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    I own Red Hail and Mockroot and love them both.

    Red Hail is mostly electric fusion, Mockroot is acoustic piano trio.

    I can't hear any zeuhl in any of them ?

  8. #58
    Member No Pride's Avatar
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    Liked it a lot! Harmonically active music makes me happy!

    I also heard and liked that Tigran album (a year ago, actually) and like others here, couldn't find it anywhere.

  9. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by nnknsh View Post
    Fine album even though I don't hear any Magma in this.
    The Tigran Hamasyans comparison sounds much closer, modern electric Jazz that mixes both World music and Math Rock / Djent Metal. Also reminds me a bit of Kurt Rosenwinkel's recent Caipi Band release, and the releases by the Brazilian multi player Antonio Loureiro's "Livre" album a bit (though Loureiro sounds less heavier and more Brazilian / World music inspired, somewhat like a math rock inspired Pat Metheny)
    Thanks very much for this post, Nobuhisa-san. I was completely unfamiliar with Antonio Loureiro's music and have really been enjoying his entire catalog. (Most of it does not fall so squarely in the context of this thread from a stylistic perspective, by the way, which I mention for the others here.) I'll also have to check out the Caipi Band album you mentioned as well when I get a chance.

    Cheers,


    Alan

    P.S. I had already been enjoying the Kenta Shimakawa album originally posted here and am also a very big Tigran Hamasyan fan (who is also looking for a legitimate way to purchase his Red Hail album at a reasonable price).

  10. #60
    I just bought the Kenta Shimakawa album on Bandcamp. Overall it's a lovely record; I don't like the growl/scream vocals on the last song, but fortunately that's only like 2 minutes. I can easily endure or skip past it.

    The rest of the disc is top-notch. Thanks for the heads up, MT.

  11. #61
    I got both the Kenta Shimakawa and Tigran Hamasyan's Red Hail last week when I was away. Spun them each twice since I got back. They're both good, but I don't think I've really penetrated either of them yet. I had to make a CDR of Glimpse because they rather stupidly repeated the last track, the second version being a slightly longer bonus version. But it's not very pleasant to have to listen to the same track twice in a row. Oh well, problem solved with the CDR.

    Red Hail is a bit more jazz-oriented than I'd anticipated. I love the rock bits, but I'm honestly just not that into jazz and it sort of feels like two albums that were squashed together without much unity. The playing is great, there's just a lot of it that doesn't really float my boat. But it's too early to give up, maybe it will grow on me, and as I say, there are many parts I like as well. Fortunately, if I don't like it, I can probably sell it for a nearly $1,500.00 profit!

    Bill

  12. #62
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    If you need to find a home for it, well, I'm just saying ......
    Ian

    Gordon Haskell - "You've got to keep the groove in your head and play a load of bollocks instead"
    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  13. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    If you need to find a home for it, well, I'm just saying ......
    LOL! Haven't given up yet, but if I sell, I'll contact you.

    Bill

  14. #64
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    Critical Quartet Experience from France


  15. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by MJBrady View Post
    Critical Quartet Experience from France
    Interesting, not bad. Not really like the Shimakawa or Hamasyan albums, but cool stuff. I might have bought their CD, but they have it on Bandcamp for 12 Euros (not including postage, I presume) and it's less than 30 minutes long. Even the freaking download is 10 Euros. I'm sorry, but that is just not a reasonable price for something EP length in my book; they music would have to absolutely blow me away, and this doesn't.

    Bill

  16. #66
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    This just showed up on YouTube: It's Kenta Shimakawa live at the New School, with a band of his fellow students - probably his senior recital. Not complete tunes, just small excerpts, but it's cool to hear and see this stuff actually being performed.



  17. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    This just showed up on YouTube: It's Kenta Shimakawa live at the New School, with a band of his fellow students - probably his senior recital. Not complete tunes, just small excerpts, but it's cool to hear and see this stuff actually being performed.
    Nice! I recognize a lot of that from the album, which I'm spinning pretty regularly. Those are almost surely the players that helped him with the album. Very cool!

    Bill

  18. #68
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Giorgi Mikadze - Georgian Microjamz (Promo)


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