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Thread: Which prog album had the most artists?

  1. #26
    I remember it took me ages to file all musicians on Jasun Martz' The Pillory/The Battle.

    Bass – Bruce Parker (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Maddie Fernwood (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Max Thomas Landow (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Yuka Woods (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Bass Drum – Jeffrey Seymour (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Bassoon – Matilda Canes (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Bugle – Tris Pough (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Cello – Cathy Maureen (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Elliot Growann (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Fred M. Goodwin (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Maria Georgey (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Zak Nickle (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Cello [Solo] – Anna Gunther (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Choir – The Royal Intercontinental Choir (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Clarinet – John Luttrelle (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Co-producer [Associate Producer] – Amanda Seward, Judith Fleischer, Keith L. Martz, Mary Owen, Russell Ellis, Scott Korn, Stacey Korn, Susan Martz Holmquist, Wyatt Gibbons
    Contrabassoon – Salvatore Rocca (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Drums – Hadley Kahn (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Electric Guitar [Detuned 12-string] – Allen Bruce Ray (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Electronics – Jeff Lowell (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Engineer [Mastering] – Michael Woodrum
    Flute, Piccolo Flute – Rene Gaulter (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    French Horn – Jon Karl (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Gong [Gongs] – Ellen S. Houseman (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Guitar [Torture] – Brian Biedul (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Jew's Harp [Jaw Harp] – Michael Katz (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Keyboards, Electronics, Synthesizer, Noises [Noise Generators], Percussion, Performer [Sheet Metal], Drums, Electric Guitar [Electric Guitars], Bass, Woodwind [Woodwinds], Horns, Vocals, Recorded By [Field Recordings], Composed By, Conductor, Arranged By, Producer, Engineer [Notational Engineering, Recording], Artwork By [Graphic Design], Photography – Jasun Martz
    Oboe – Melissa Prusack (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Orchestra – The Intercontinental Philharmonic Orchestra (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Percussion – David Cremin (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Erica Lemane (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Jeff Yansi (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Jessica Moette (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Mike Brown (14) (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Tim Buckett (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Performer [Crustation], Synthesizer – Bill Bell (9) (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Piano, Percussion, Guitar – Peter Ashby (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Synthesizer – John Sherwood (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Synthesizer, Performer [Reaktor] – Allesandro Cortini* (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Synthesizer, Sequenced By [Sequencers] – Mark Shreeve (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Theremin – Kevin C. Smith (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Trombone – David Thomson (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Graham Pough (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Trumpet – Alison F. Yuh (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Trumpet [Solo] – Nick Salato (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Viola – Andrew Robertson (2) (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Jack T. Katz (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Jules Reed Maple (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Julie Adi (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Lauren Lewis (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Ryan Colin (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Tom Zaback (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Violin – Allison Green (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Anne Vittandini (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), David Tomson (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Gerry Meetly (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Holly McDowell (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Jerry M. Gray (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Jewel Lakes (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Joy Lai (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Michael Ann Phillips (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Nicole Richards (2) (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Piper Martz (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Roger Bace (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Sarah Leaf (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Tommy Greenson (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Violin [Solo] – Benedict Brydern*
    Vocals – Alice Stephens* (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Angela Wilds (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Anna Gunther (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Anna Marks (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Caroline Cossu (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Chris Bedworth (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Christopher Weller (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Cynthia Martz (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Edward Ditomas (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Ellen Payne (2) (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Emily Westwood (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), G. Wolfe (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Gregg Hill (2) (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Gregory David (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Henri Levbake (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Jenny Barret (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Jenny V. Avon (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Jeremiah Todds (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Jill Hillen (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Joe Bellsin (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Joseph Roberts (2) (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Josh Devon (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Julianne Jones (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Mary Ann Lowell (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Melissa Prusack (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Michelle Frioloi (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Michelle Getty (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Milo Smith (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Mischa Miller (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Patricia Thomason (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Paul Franklen (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Rebecca Leighton (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Rob Brizon (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Sam Circela (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Sienna Martz (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Simmons Carter (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Stern Stegner (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Teal Martz (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Victoria Edwards (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1), Yansi Giannini (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)
    Woodwind – Chris Broderick (tracks: 1.1, 1.2. 1.4 to 2.1)

  2. #27
    Member Camelogue's Avatar
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    Why would anyone care?

  3. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    And if you can show a mid 70s music publication that calls it a Progressive Rock album, I'll buy you a new car.
    Do you actually give a flying fuck what the music magazines say?
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  4. #29
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    If I'm not mistaken, the latest album by United Progressive Fraternity, Planetary Overload, lists 46 musicians, without counting individual members of choirs or orchestras.

  5. #30
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Do you actually give a flying fuck what the music magazines say?
    Whether you like them or not, they were the ones who set the temperature. They were the ones who gave names. They were the ones who codified the many different strands of music that came forth in that era.

    Context matters. It especially matters when discussing something historical. So, given that the music journalists (and to a lesser extent the DJs) were the ones who named and described the landscape that we obsess over today, yes, I think their eyewitness POV matters, and I'll take it over the modern Internet revisionists any day.

    I'm not a fan of building geodesic domes or alternative fact universes. (And I'm not suggesting that you are.) But that tends to be the result when historicity and wider agreed upon terms are discarded in favor of more localized definitions.

  6. #31
    Authorities don't determine usage. A good dictionary (like Webster's or the OED) knows this and strives to keep up with actual usage, rather than trying to prescribe it.

    How a magazine used a term in the 1970s may (or may not) reflect how the term was actually used then.

    It certainly doesn't define how the term is used in the 2010s (nearly 2020s).

    Stevie Wonder's core albums (Songs in the Key of Life, Fulfillingness's First Finale, Innervisions and arguably Secret Life of Plants) were unquestionably progressive by any reasonable definition of the word.

    Are they "rock"? My first response to that is, who cares? They're good, adventurous music that plays with, and occasionally breaks, the formulas of the time. What more do you want?
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  7. #32
    Member rcarlberg's Avatar
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    You forgot Stevie’s music of my mind and talking book.

    And what we call “progressive rock” today was often called “art rock” in the ‘70s.

  8. #33
    I didn't forget them, I just don't consider them "core."

    You're right about "art rock."
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  9. #34
    Wim Mertens - Inescapable 1980-2020 counts 92 musicians and 3 orchestras.
    One can argue is it is progressive rock, it ain't rock I think, but I don't care about labels.
    The other problem would be it is a collection of works he recorded in 40 years, which means one could consider it not really being an album.

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