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Thread: Astor Piazzolla plays prog!

  1. #1
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    Astor Piazzolla plays prog!

    Shown on the Swiss TV show TSR Mosaïque, on May 18, in 1977. This was on his 1977 European tour, and featured:

    Astor Piazzolla on bandoneon
    Luis Ferreyra on flute.
    Osvaldo Caló on Crumar combo organ,
    Daniel Piazzolla on ARP synth
    Gustavo Beytelmann on piano,
    Tomás Gubitsch on guitar,
    Ricardo Sanz on bass, and
    Luis Ceravolo on drums,



    Notice that he plays all the notes on the draw (pulling outward), and has a box to put his leg on, like John Petrucci.
    Last edited by Baribrotzer; 12-18-2019 at 10:08 AM.

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    TSR is Swiss, not French. (Television Suisse-Romande)

  3. #3
    Nah, 'cause prog is like Genesis and Yes - and this doesn't sound like any of those two. And who the hell is this pizza guy anyways?
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  4. #4
    One of the greatest musical figures of the previous century, and a player that never failed to move me. As a youngster, I had Zero Hours on written tape and played it until oblivion. His Concerto for Bandoneon is also a stone cold classic.

    Prog? The intensity of music and arrangements in Zero Hours is definitely close to the rock aesthetics. Me and my friend used to head-bang to parts of the music.

  5. #5
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    Astor Piazzolla plays prog!

    aka to Piazolla snobs (I'm sure they exist)

    The pandering electric tour!

    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

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    This space for rent: Well established location. Perfect opportunity for an up and coming smart-ass to benefit from our years of provocation!

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    Prog? The intensity of music and arrangements in Zero Hours is definitely close to the rock aesthetics.
    One of Kido Natsuki's main objectives on forming Salle Gaveau was to create music which purportedly "reenvisioned" the horizon of Piazzolla's. I always thought they succeeded quite marvellously, but as you point out there wasn't really any need for "reenvisioning" - the force was already in place.

    Another 'progressive' maverick who took on Piazzolla's legacy was Gustavo Moretto with Alas, especially on their second album Pinta tu Aldea.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

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    It is my duty as a Hamilloid to mention that Peter Hammill named Astor Piazzolla as one of his faves when asked what he listened to.

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    Quote Originally Posted by calyx View Post
    TSR is Swiss, not French. (Television Suisse-Romande)
    Fixed. I didn't research it - just recognized the language - but I probably should have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    Prog? The intensity of music and arrangements in Zero Hours is definitely close to the rock aesthetics. Me and my friend used to head-bang to parts of the music.
    Piazzolla's original quintet is, in my opinion, one of the great small musical ensembles of the last century - equal to Miles's first quintet, the Beatles or any other of the great rock bands, and any of the great string quartets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Another 'progressive' maverick who took on Piazzolla's legacy was Gustavo Moretto with Alas, especially on their second album Pinta tu Aldea.
    He did go even further in this direction with the overlooked third Album by Alas



    Also very cool are the Tangofied versions of classic Alas tracks

    Last edited by TheH; 12-18-2019 at 11:04 AM.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by TheH View Post
    He did go even further in this direction with the overlooked third Album by Alas

    I love this third Alas album and we were very fortunate to see an American lineup of the band perform what I believe may have been their last performance as Alas (in October of 2007, here in New Jersey). Gustavo has gone on to produce some other great music, but it's definitely further away from prog (and more toward jazz). Here are a couple of live videos from about five years back, in the last configuration that we'd seen in concert:





    On a related note, we hoped to host an evening of Argentinian progressive jazz, with Gustavo's septet and Raffo, but Raffo ended up being able to secure the necessary backing to fly up from Argentina.

    Cheers,


    Alan

    P.S. Love Astor!

  12. #12
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    ^^

    Thanks for the vids, great stuff.

    Raffo's "Música de Flores" series is also awesome, but somewhat hard to find over here in physical form.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by TheH View Post
    ^^

    Thanks for the vids, great stuff.

    Raffo's "Música de Flores" series is also awesome, but somewhat hard to find over here in physical form.
    My pleasure. It's virtually impossible to get Raffo's CDs here as well (except for the Trigémino album that was released a little while back). I've had to resort to buying the discs directly from Juan, which I'm thankful to be able to do.

    All the best,


    Alan

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    Thanks for the thread John!... and good day to everyone.

    EXACTLY why I come to this sight almost each day! That clip was (and using an expression many longtime and native Vermonters use(I've only been a resident since 2002!) WICKED GOOD ~ I'm going to definitely explore Piazolla more!

    Carry On
    Chris Buckley
    Last edited by winkersnufs; 12-18-2019 at 01:43 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by winkersnufs View Post
    WICKED GOOD ~ I'm going to definitely explore Piazolla more!
    Tango: Zero Hour is a great place to start, though I don't know if it's still in print.

  16. #16
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    It's in print (and we even stock it) and I agree it's a great starter - it's where I started and it's still probably my favorite.
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    This space for rent: Well established location. Perfect opportunity for an up and coming smart-ass to benefit from our years of provocation!

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  17. #17
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    More good bandoneon prog:

  18. #18
    Notice that he plays all the notes on the draw (pulling outward), and has a box to put his leg on, like John Petrucci.
    Did you mean to say that John Petrucci uses a box like Piazzolla used since probably 1939?

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    One of Kido Natsuki's main objectives on forming Salle Gaveau was to create music which purportedly "reenvisioned" the horizon of Piazzolla's. I always thought they succeeded quite marvellously, but as you point out there wasn't really any need for "reenvisioning" - the force was already in place
    No surprise you catch me again unawares. But yes, if you add drums to the music, it's definitely within the scope of rock music. In the beginning of Contrabajissimo from Zero Hours there is this weird percussion thing (someone is hitting his instrument there, maybe Astor banging on the bandoneon, who knows) which creates this rock effect. All in all there is great balance between classical/chamber music, jazz and the force of rock music - all filtered through the power of tango and Argentinian passion.

    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    Piazzolla's original quintet is, in my opinion, one of the great small musical ensembles of the last century - equal to Miles's first quintet, the Beatles or any other of the great rock bands, and any of the great string quartets.
    Yes - exactly. I wonder what his status is in the Us or the rest of the world (in Greece he is considered a legend).

  20. #20


    Which artist nowadays could convey emotion and beauty like this? Piazzolla invented a language of emotions and feelings through music, but the most astonishing thing is the clarity of this wordless language, each phrase is overflowing with concrete meaning, to be understood only in the depths of the human heart.

    A 15 for Zero Hours from this little corner of the world.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by rickm View Post
    Did you mean to say that John Petrucci uses a box like Piazzolla used since probably 1939?
    Look, it's the pizza guy imitating Petrucci - not the other way around. Prog comes first.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

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    FYI, Osvaldo Caro used to be in a prog band Ave Rock, and Tommy Gubitsch was from Spinetta's semi prog band Invisible, so there ARE prog connections with this band......

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    During the late 70s, Piazzolla have praised Return to Forever highly, and told intention on making a composition inspired by them.

    It is said that this "500 Motivaciones" is that composition, and while Piazzolla himself never recorded it, then young Tango / Fusion ensemble Nuevos Aires recorded it in 1983, which appears on their CD "Musica De La Ciudad De Nuevos Aires" . I do not know if this was released on vinyl around the time of recording, or remained unreleased till the release of CD though.

    The video below looks more recent (so could be from the time around the CD got released), but sounds quite phenomenal, and I think it do justice to this great composition by the master (BTW, Daniell Binelli who plays the bandoneon hre also appears on the Alas album mentioned above) .


  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by nnknsh View Post
    FYI, Osvaldo Caro used to be in a prog band Ave Rock, and Tommy Gubitsch was from Spinetta's semi prog band Invisible, so there ARE prog connections with this band......
    Well, if Invisible were a "semi prog" band - what the hell does this make of Asia, GTR, Phil Collins' boxsets or Yes South/West?

    "Los Libros de la Buena Memoria" (second track from Invisible's final album) hears the bandoneon prominently utilized, I believe. Albeit essentially a latin jazz-elegy, Spinetta could at least write actual songs. Ave Rock were great too, particularly Espacios. Of course, there are folks unaware that Alas (Moretto's group) also once had a capacity like Pedro Aznar in their ranks.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

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    As for Asia, GTR, Phil Collins' boxsets or Yes South/West, arena Rock done by ex-prog musicians may be ?
    I actually liked some of their songs here and there, but overall haven't gave much attention on them (especailly in the last 20 years) so I may be wrong on this assumption....

    No doubt about Spinetta being a tremendous writer, and a HUGE figure on the Argentian / Latin American Rock music. Though I don't really consider any of his album / projects as being full fledged Prog (though "A 18' Del Sol" and the early Spinetta Jade albums get quite close).

    Wasn't that bandoneon on that Invisible track played by Gusttavo Morreto (Alas) ?

    Pedro Aznar also appeared on the semi-prog ensemble Seru Giran (whch was led by another Argentian Rock legend Charly Garcia) . Actually their approach have some similarity with those e-prog arena rockers, though for me that Seru Giran had much better songs overall.



    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Well, if Invisible were a "semi prog" band - what the hell does this make of Asia, GTR, Phil Collins' boxsets or Yes South/West?

    "Los Libros de la Buena Memoria" (second track from Invisible's final album) hears the bandoneon prominently utilized, I believe. Albeit essentially a latin jazz-elegy, Spinetta could at least write actual songs. Ave Rock were great too, particularly Espacios. Of course, there are folks unaware that Alas (Moretto's group) also once had a capacity like Pedro Aznar in their ranks.

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