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Thread: More Steve Hackett News!

  1. #1
    Member dgtlman's Avatar
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    More Steve Hackett News!

    Tour 2020. Gigging the entire Seconds Out album!
    Wasn't that Seconds Out concert footage shot in Dallas? If so here's to hoping he'll finally go there.


    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/m...t-tour-917997/

  2. #2
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    “This time with all numbers played in full plus additional surprises!" Bruford!


    to start a rumor

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    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
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    Very interesting.
    The fans love Genesis so Steve fills their need.

    The 1976 and 1977 tours were the best (IMO); I sure enjoyed them. "Seconds Out" sure was both a testament to that as well as an album that was very big for them.
    Steve really came out of his shell during those tours.

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    We've been enjoying revisiting some of the classic Genesis albums the last several weekends. Trespass, Nursery Crimes Foxtrot and Sunday it was Selling England.
    In listening to them, and I have hundreds of times over the years, something really struck me and that is how MUCH Steve Hackett made up the Genesis sound.
    Having seen him in concert several times and most recently the Wolflight tour and watching all the DVD's since the Genesis revisited stuff came out, I've always been a fan but I have a deeper appreciation for him more than ever before.

    My primary focus when these albums were released was of course Peter and since I love synths, Tony Banks. But Steve's resurrection of the Genesis music has made me realize how under recognized he has been for his contribution to those PG/Genesis albums.
    While listening I would focus on his parts, and how his style and sound gave the music the grit and power that kicked up a couple of layers. Imagine the music without Steve's guitar parts and I think you'll understand what I'm trying to say.

    And if we look at the history of Genesis post Steve Hackett it's even more clear how much he was missed.
    Of course the direction greatly changed when Phil's solo career skyrocketed, and the whole dynamics of the band changed.

    Also, it's funny the RS article says there are no North American dates planned as yet, but about a month ago his tickets went on sale here in Clearwater for a spring 2020 date.
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    Orange Tick Squasher Buddhabreath's Avatar
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    ^^^ Yes, always loved Hackett's sound. Definitely an underrated guitarist outside of prog-snob circles.
    The combined fortunes of the world's 26 richest individuals reached $1.4 trillion last year — the same amount as the total wealth of the 3.8 billion poorest people.

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  6. #6
    Sounds like a thunderously awesome tour. He better bring it to the states after Europe, and in particular Chicago. Steve is the master of classic Genesis, nobody brings it like he does, not even close. He owns it.

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    Member srtd4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    Also, it's funny the RS article says there are no North American dates planned as yet, but about a month ago his tickets went on sale here in Clearwater for a spring 2020 date.
    Steve's web site shows this date as :SELLING ENGLAND BY THE POUND & SPECTRAL MORNINGS & Solo Highlights

    Scott

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    Member dgtlman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Man In The Mountain View Post
    Steve is the master of classic Genesis, nobody brings it like he does, not even close. He owns it.
    Yep absolutely!!! My brother & I traveled to Chicago last month for that show at the Copernicus. It was stellar. Packed house too.

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    Member bigjohnwayne's Avatar
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    Several thoughts:

    1. Out of everyone in that band, it was Steve Hackett who heard what we did in Genesis: something majestic and beautiful. He recognizes it was not just the songwriting, but the textures and the feeling of taking a journey, that their cultists enjoyed so much.

    2. I wonder what the actual setlists were for those Paris shows that led to Seconds Out. Did they play "The Cinema Show" in '77? I suppose they did, and just preferred the take with Bruford. Did they play "Afterglow" without a lead-in? I think they did "In that Quiet Earth" and it was just edited off. What other Wind and Wuthering stuff did they play that year? "Eleventh Earl" and "One for the Vine" too, at least.

    3. Is there anything on Seconds Out that Hackett hasn't played live in the Genesis Revisited era? I'm thinking maybe just "Robbery Assault and Battery".

    4. Who knew Roger King could pull off all of those Tony Banks synth leads, organ chords, and piano parts? He must have twice the skills he did when he joined up with Hackett around the turn of the millennium.

  10. #10
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    Steve richly deserves all the accolates and huge crowds he is now generating. About 12 years ago, or maybe more, he played at a small club in Ottawa and our table was directly against the stage. He's on a roll.
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

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    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigjohnwayne View Post
    Several thoughts:

    1. Out of everyone in that band, it was Steve Hackett who heard what we did in Genesis: something majestic and beautiful. He recognizes it was not just the songwriting, but the textures and the feeling of taking a journey, that their cultists enjoyed so much.

    2. I wonder what the actual setlists were for those Paris shows that led to Seconds Out. Did they play "The Cinema Show" in '77? I suppose they did, and just preferred the take with Bruford. Did they play "Afterglow" without a lead-in? I think they did "In that Quiet Earth" and it was just edited off. What other Wind and Wuthering stuff did they play that year? "Eleventh Earl" and "One for the Vine" too, at least.

    3. Is there anything on Seconds Out that Hackett hasn't played live in the Genesis Revisited era? I'm thinking maybe just "Robbery Assault and Battery".

    4. Who knew Roger King could pull off all of those Tony Banks synth leads, organ chords, and piano parts? He must have twice the skills he did when he joined up with Hackett around the turn of the millennium.
    No Cinema Show at my 1977 MSG show
    https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/genes...-7bd2d6dc.html

    And yes, "In that Quiet Earth" preceded "Afterglow"

    It was a helluva show. And absolutely, Hackett was indispensable. While I admire Daryl S's work with the band, he was very different and just couldn't or wouldn't do many of the atmospheric sounds that Steve is so good at. (I have seen Steve 3 times with the band and three times solo...this last time a month ago I was just feet away from him and really focused on all those subtle, ethereal sounds. Just the smallest movements were so important. He is a genius and still at the top of his game.

    And no surprise that Roger King can do it all...he has been a great player for a long time.

    EDIT: Yes, he has played everything live except R, A & B (per Rolling Stone)
    Last edited by Gizmotron; 1 Week Ago at 06:00 PM.

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    Member bigjohnwayne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotron View Post
    No Cinema Show at my 1977 MSG show
    [url]

    And no surprise that Roger King can do it all...he has been a great player for a long time.
    No disrespect meant to the man!

    Circa Darktown i figured Roger King was a producer first and keyboard player second. I saw the Hackett band live in 2002 and thought he did a great job on keys, but when I saw Hackett again in 2014/2015ish and listened to the recent live stuff I was amazed--this guy is doing Apocalypse in 9/8, the Cinema Show, Ripples, etc. That is a tall order for even the most excellent keyboardist.

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    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigjohnwayne View Post
    No disrespect meant to the man!

    Circa Darktown i figured Roger King was a producer first and keyboard player second. I saw the Hackett band live in 2002 and thought he did a great job on keys, but when I saw Hackett again in 2014/2015ish and listened to the recent live stuff I was amazed--this guy is doing Apocalypse in 9/8, the Cinema Show, Ripples, etc. That is a tall order for even the most excellent keyboardist.
    Oh yeah, I understood your comment. And truly, he HAS grown immensely. Trying to cover all those lines will do that for you.
    He simply nails it in concert. Of course, Hackett always has great players. I really enjoyed his new drummer. Just excellent.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by bigjohnwayne View Post
    Several thoughts:

    1. Out of everyone in that band, it was Steve Hackett who heard what we did in Genesis: something majestic and beautiful. He recognizes it was not just the songwriting, but the textures and the feeling of taking a journey, that their cultists enjoyed so much.

    2. I wonder what the actual setlists were for those Paris shows that led to Seconds Out. Did they play "The Cinema Show" in '77? I suppose they did, and just preferred the take with Bruford. Did they play "Afterglow" without a lead-in? I think they did "In that Quiet Earth" and it was just edited off. What other Wind and Wuthering stuff did they play that year? "Eleventh Earl" and "One for the Vine" too, at least.

    3. Is there anything on Seconds Out that Hackett hasn't played live in the Genesis Revisited era? I'm thinking maybe just "Robbery Assault and Battery".

    4. Who knew Roger King could pull off all of those Tony Banks synth leads, organ chords, and piano parts? He must have twice the skills he did when he joined up with Hackett around the turn of the millennium.
    I have a boot from Zurich '77 and I wanna say there were other songs.. Here's the set list for Philly..

    March 8, 1977
    The Spectrum
    Philadelphia, PA
    USA
    Taper: Lostbrook

    01 Squonk (7:05)
    02 One For The Vine (11:18)
    03 Robbery, Assault, And Battery (7:13)
    04 Your Own Special Way (7:14)
    05 Firth Of Fifth (8:57)
    06 The Carpet Crawlers (6:47)
    07 In That Quiet Earth (4:35)
    08 Afterglow (4:27)
    09 I Know What I Like (9:16)
    10 Eleventh Earl Of Mar (9:37)
    11 Supper's Ready (23:28)
    12 Dance On A Volcano (5:11)
    13 Los Endos (5:37)
    14 The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway/The Musical Box (7:48)

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    Member bigjohnwayne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by happytheman View Post
    I have a boot from Zurich '77 and I wanna say there were other songs.. Here's the set list for Philly..
    I forgot I used to have that boot!

    After listening to it a few times I made the conclusion that the urban legend that Hackett was mixed out of Seconds Out was a myth. I've listened to many Genesis boots from 73 to 77 and Hackett is never mixed any higher than I hear him on Seconds Out. (Which makes me wonder--why does the original Genesis Live sound so vital and dangerous?)

    After spending an alarming percentage of my 20s and early 30s listening to King Crimson live records, I always want Squonk to sound more intense live than it does, but that is ok. It is Genesis being Genesis. I'm sure they sounded louder and more majestic in the house. Those bass pedals helped with that, I'm sure.

    A live album will come out for this, I'm sure. There will be no one to mix Hackett out this time, at any rate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigjohnwayne View Post
    2. I wonder what the actual setlists were for those Paris shows that led to Seconds Out. Did they play "The Cinema Show" in '77? I suppose they did, and just preferred the take with Bruford. Did they play "Afterglow" without a lead-in? I think they did "In that Quiet Earth" and it was just edited off. What other Wind and Wuthering stuff did they play that year? "Eleventh Earl" and "One for the Vine" too, at least.
    They played most of W&W at some point on its tour. I think 'Blood On The Rooftops' and 'Unquiet Slumbers...' were the only two songs not to be played at all.

    'The Cinema Show' was only played in 1976, I believe. However Collins' somewhat grating, long 'Romeo and Juliet' spoken intro was, bizarrely, used for 'Supper's Ready' instead.

    Seconds Out is still one of my favourite live albums, regardless of what wasn't included.

    I think 'Eleventh Earl Of Mar' was actually better live on the following tour anyway, where it was the first number of the set. The version on the famous Chicago 1978 radio broadcast/bootleg is terrific.

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    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    They played most of W&W at some point on its tour. I think 'Blood On The Rooftops' and 'Unquiet Slumbers...' were the only two songs not to be played at all.

    'The Cinema Show' was only played in 1976, I believe. However Collins' somewhat grating, long 'Romeo and Juliet' spoken intro was, bizarrely, used for 'Supper's Ready' instead.

    Seconds Out is still one of my favourite live albums, regardless of what wasn't included.

    I think 'Eleventh Earl Of Mar' was actually better live on the following tour anyway, where it was the first number of the set. The version on the famous Chicago 1978 radio broadcast/bootleg is terrific.
    Correct about the switcheroo on the intro story. I think most fans feel he did that purposefully to fool people at the shows...a very Gabriel thing to do actually. (He was very aware of the expectations of Gabriel fans so he both stayed quite close to the blueprint while also asserting his own approach. It was just a bit in 76, more in 77, and then he was much bolder in 1978.) I thought the "misdirect" was pretty funny at the time.

    I also agree with you on "Eleventh Earl of Mar" in 1978. It was a killer way to start the show. And it was another superb show. The mirrors were a huge part of that. I have rarely seen such a cool show.

    I have some decent photos of the set because I was 9th row, in front of Daryl. There were great opportunities to get overhead views of the players from the mirrors when they were tilted 45 degrees towards the audience. I spent no small amount of time watching the drummers' techniques and Tony's hands. Such a cool show...and I don't think anyone has ever done a similar thing at a show. The light operators fully exploited all of the possibilities with the mirrors. When blue lights were aimed at the mirrors from below so that they shone down onto the stage and then moved them slowly in time with the rhythms of "Afterglow"....wow...just wow. Another great technique was bouncing the white spotlights off two mirror panels on either side of the stage during "One for the Vine."

    Here is the setlist from the MSG show in 1978. Cinema show made its return appearance.
    https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/genes...-3bd50460.html

    Through all those shows Hackett was just superb.

    Oh, and did I mention Peter Gabriel coming out for the encore of "I know What I Like?" Despite his crew-cut and Mao jacket, I spotted him immediately. So many people didn't know who it was at first! They sang the song together and of course, Phil did his tambourine bit while Peter played some percussion. It was a great thing and the only time i have seen gabriel live.
    Last edited by Gizmotron; 1 Week Ago at 07:36 PM. Reason: Gabriel

  18. #18
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    Blood On The Rooftops, during TMB's last show in my home town, was a highlight of the show. My wife is just getting into prog and that song rings a big bell with her.
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

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    Haven’t played seconds out in ages. This reminds me to dust it off again.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotron View Post
    I also agree with you on "Eleventh Earl of Mar" in 1978. It was a killer way to start the show. And it was another superb show. The mirrors were a huge part of that. I have rarely seen such a cool show.
    The 1978 tour is underrated, I think. Certainly that Chicago show is one of my most listened to by anyone.

    That 1977 King Biscuit Rainbow broadcast is interesting because it has most of the songs regularly played on the 1977 tour which didn't make it to Seconds Out.

    http://radioguide.genesis-movement.o...html#x-02jan77

    'Inside And Out' and 'Your Own Special Way' are the main omissions but they were added to the set later.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    The 1978 tour is underrated, I think. Certainly that Chicago show is one of my most listened to by anyone.



    yes!



    and let's not forget that the Knebworth show was broadcast (and rebroadcasted many times); I was 10 and the Knebworth show was the first time I had ever heard 'Fountain of Salmacis' which I believe was the only tour that that song was revisited upon.

    I was so not familiar with the early stuff that for a few months I thought it was called 'The Fountains Are Our Masters' (yes I still have my cassette recording from WMMR) as I misinterpreted pcollins accent lol



    they just were on fire in 78, esp with all of those club shows. I have a good deal of that tour in my Genesis boot collection. some variety in there too with certain ...three... cuts making rare appearances
    2trevorsforlife

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    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    Blood On The Rooftops, during TMB's last show in my home town, was a highlight of the show. My wife is just getting into prog and that song rings a big bell with her.
    Absolutely...that Musical Box show was unique. While i love the older shows they have done this one was a special blend of eras. Their coverage of Trick/WW was cool.

    (This comparison of the Steve Hackett Revisited and The Musical Box that comes up from time to time is fascinating. My perspective is that TMB gives a fairly faithful performance of what Genesis did back in the day, especially Peter. (Tony remarked how eerily accurate the performance was the night he "sneaked into" their show.) The instruments are almost all vintage and accurate. I love hearing the real ARPs and the original guitar effects. The drummer really courts Phil's style and has period-correct drums. It is very satisfying in that original, somewhat "lo-fi" way.

    Steve's versions are 21st century covers that stun with their fidelity and robustness. The equipment is state-of-the-art and it all sounds glorious. I like how he takes some liberties with the songs. He trades out instrumentation sometimes, and in general, makes them his own. Nad does what Nad does...he sounds much like Peter and Phil yet sounds like...Nad. He has the audience watching every move. What a delightful character he is. He is perfect for these shows.

    So in other words, I don't have a favorite. I love both approaches and can never resist throwing my money down when they come around.)

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    Would like to see this but begrudge paying a year in advance.

  24. #24
    Why was there no newsletter about this? I usually get them all.

  25. #25
    Member bill g's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    Blood On The Rooftops, during TMB's last show in my home town, was a highlight of the show. My wife is just getting into prog and that song rings a big bell with her.
    When I saw Hackett in... 2016 I think?, I kept waiting in anticipation for 'Blood On The Rooftops' as he'd played it on the European leg of the tour, and... he didn't play it! And on the last Genesis tour, Tony really wanted to play it but Mike didn't want to, of course the guitar would be a challenge... Would be a beautiful thing live!

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