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Thread: A Return to Form or Why Are Their Best Years Always Behind Them

  1. #26
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    I do think that there is one other thing to consider, which is that every artist [hopefully] brings something new to the table. That something new is their style or their contribution to the artform or their musicality or whatever it is that makes them 'them' and makes them special in the mind of their listeners.

    Usually an artist has that and only that. They may do different things with it but that particular that is them. Of course it's sharper and more refreshing when it's new (their 1st few releases / their first few tours) then when it's what they have done for 30 years in the public eye.

    anyway, I think that that also has something to do with this discussion as well....
    Steve F.

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  2. #27
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jarmsuh View Post
    Music is like movies, it is more difficult to be creative when your work is compared to everything that has been done before.
    This is what I said but in a different way and I tend to agree.

    That doesn't mean that there isn't burn out, but some of it is just an exhaustion of the specialness. The specialness isn't gone but IF you've already heard it a bunch of times, even if it is very special will you still hear it that way?
    Steve F.

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    This space for rent: Well established location. Perfect opportunity for an up and coming smart-ass to benefit from our years of provocation!

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Success, more than time, is the enemy of creativity.

    Some artists remain creative their whole lives, despite the trappings of success. But it's rare.
    What he said.

  4. #29
    Member thedunno's Avatar
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    Peter Hammill still manages to surprise me every few records. All that might have been was an album with a cinematic approach that we had not heared before. Also VDGG's a grounding in numbers showed a refreshed modernized band with shorter punchier songs.

    I am not saying that Hammill is still at his creative peak but that an artist with such a large discography can still take you by surprise is pretty unique.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasKDye View Post
    Uriah Heep is still kind of killing it, honestly. Bernie Shaw is a great vocalist and their songs alternate between blistering rock and big thoughtful ballads. They feel as solid as their early stuff.
    Yup but I would prefer if I'm able to get a time machine to take me in 1970 that to see them live in the Marquee club, i.e. at the time when they were an underground band with young David Byron as their vocalist.

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  7. #32
    Member thedunno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    Magma
    then why do they release albums with music that was written decades ago? [emoji3526]

  8. #33
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thedunno View Post
    then why do they release albums with music that was written decades ago? [emoji3526]
    But you are now suggesting that what was written then, was better than what is recorded or performed today?
    Actually there are new stuff along the way too like Slag Tanz, Félicité Thösz.
    If you have seen Magma live, you would know that there is not much fatigue there.

  9. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by thedunno View Post
    then why do they release albums with music that was written decades ago? [emoji3526]
    It's still material that hasn't surfaced before, at least in studio. Do you reallyknow that Hammill hasn't stored songs from the past that he's presenting for new material? And would that matter?
    Hammill is keeping a decent level for sure, but there is nothing that comes close to his 70's masterpieces. Magma on the other hand has been putting out the last 20 years some music that comes near masterpiece status: K.A., Felicite Thosz, Zess, Slag Tanz - these are new, excellent records and their live performances kick ass. Yes, no Kohntarkosz of course or Udu Wudu. But still they have retained a lot of their creative force.

    I wouldn't say that for any other of the 70's prog bands or artists. Just my opinion.

  10. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    This is what I said but in a different way and I tend to agree.

    That doesn't mean that there isn't burn out, but some of it is just an exhaustion of the specialness. The specialness isn't gone but IF you've already heard it a bunch of times, even if it is very special will you still hear it that way?
    I certainly have experienced this with some of the classic long form songs from the 70's.. I've found if I give them a long enough break between listening.. sometimes months I can capture that original excitement I had when the song made an impression on me as a teenager.. I'm not one of those guys who listened to Tarkus or Suppers Ready out of the gate and embraced it.. some of those songs back in the day took a few listens before they made their impact.. and then it seemed like I couldn't get enough of them... I.E DSOTM as I recall stayed on my turntable for a couple of weeks.. Fast forward 4 decades and I'm quite happy listening to CTTE every time I get on my riding mower to cut the grass.. I have it timed to where I get to the end of And You and I as I'm pulling back into my garage with the mower..

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by jarmsuh View Post
    Music is like movies, it is more difficult to be creative when your work is compared to everything that has been done before. How many more notes in music can play an artist. Today it's all about how you can match up your past influences with your personal touches. The differences between creatives artists are less obvious today than in the '70s where you have an explosion of creativity in prog rock music. The bands that have still have creativity in their work after a long time are those who play a style of music that is more on the experimental side, and like someone said those are rare.
    I remember seeing an interview with Ian Anderson quite a few years ago on some talk show. I think this was around the time that “Roots To Branches” was released if I am remembering right. I am paraphrasing here, but at some point, Anderson made the statement “we used to compete against other bands, but today we compete against our back catalogue”. As with your comment about movies, his point was that any new music that they made was always being compared to past music they had made which people considered “classic” at a certain time in their lives. Any new music that they put out, no matter how good it was, seemed destined not to ever be considered on the same level as their past material.

  12. #37
    As a guitarist, Steve Hackett gets better every time I see him unlike many of his peers. It's very inspiring to see a man who is almost 70 playing at his level and intensity.

  13. #38
    Member jarmsuh's Avatar
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    Listening to Anderson, Howe, Wakeman and Bruford self-titled album the other day which is not considered to be a "classic" album and I have never been so impressed with it. Is it the creative melodies or that some Yes members were some kind of genius, or was it me... (I was not drunk or stoned)

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by the winter tree View Post
    As a guitarist, Steve Hackett gets better every time I see him unlike many of his peers. It's very inspiring to see a man who is almost 70 playing at his level and intensity.
    Agree, having just seen him last week, the guy just keeps getting better.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    It depends what you like, of course. I and a lot of other Marillion fans think their most recent album (I forget what it is - the fifteenth or sixteenth or something) is one of their best, but some fans think their best days are long behind them.
    F.E.A.R.? Really? I couldn't disagree more. I had trouble getting through that one.
    Chad

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