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Thread: Ken Burns PBS Documentary Country Music

  1. #101
    Outraged bystander markwoll's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StarThrower View Post
    It's American music and it's history, so I'll watch it as well. I knew you were kidding because nobody knows these acoustic string musicians and bluegrass players. I would say Alison Krauss is the only one who can fill up a big theater playing acoustic bluegrass music. The others had to plug in and play the twangy country stuff to draw a big audience.
    Go see Gillian Welch & The Dave Rawlings Machine
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  2. #102
    Moderator Sean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plasmatopia View Post
    Some of it is like hair metal with violins, banjos, and twangy vocals.
    Thank Shania Twain's hubby, arena rock producer Mutt Lange (Def Leppard, etc) for pushing it that direction about 20 years ago now.

  3. #103
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    Thank Shania Twain's hubby, arena rock producer Mutt Lange (Def Leppard, etc) for pushing it that direction about 20 years ago now.
    Bad doggie.
    Can this be the swan song? The final elbow?

  4. #104
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    When Hank Williams III first surfaced, the Williams family tried to deny his legitimacy or some such nonsense. I do remember that Hank III met Minnie Pearl and she said, "Lord honey, you're a ghost." That kinda ended that controversy.
    .
    I never herad any talk of Hank III being dissed by the family (which wouldn't make any sense, as he's Hank Jr's son). What I do remember is that it turned out that Hank Sr actually had a daughter, who he knew about, he had even signed documents admitting his paternity and had intended to take custody, etc, but he died literally days before she was born. Jett Williams ended up being adopted after both her mother and maternal grandmother passed away, and never knew who her father was until she was an adult. She ended up having to sue the family to get her share of everything. Then when a judge found in her favor, according to Wikipedia, Hank Jr tried to have the decision reversed on appeal, but failed.

  5. #105
    Member progholio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by saucyjackstl View Post
    <QUOTE>Some pedal steel players I like:

    Jerry Garcia (Grateful Dead)
    Buddy Cage (New Riders Of The Purple Sage)
    Al Perkins (Manassas)
    Robert Randolph (Robert Randolph and the Family Band)
    Jeff Baxter (Steely Dan)
    Glenn Ross Campbell (The Misunderstood)
    Sneaky Pete Kleinow (Flying Burrito Brothers)
    Greg Leisz (Bill Frisell)
    Red Rhodes (Michael Nesmith and the First National Band)
    Rusty Young (Poco)
    Bill Elm (Friends Of Dean Martinez)</QUOTE>

    Can't list any pedal steel players without including Ben Keith who played with Neil Young, Emmylou Harris and many others. He was something special GRHS.

    put the names Speedy West and Buddy Emmons in the google engine and hit "Enter"

  6. #106
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    put the names Speedy West and Buddy Emmons in the google engine and hit "Enter
    Not necessary, for me. I am familiar with them and own albums they play on. My list was not meant to be all-inclusive. I was just naming a few favorite steel guitar players off the top of my head. But thanks for the recommendation. As far as I'm concerned, they're all good.
    Can this be the swan song? The final elbow?

  7. #107
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    I was surprised by Kris Kristofferson's story about getting the letter from his mother. It never said whether they made up or not, but had I been in his shoes, it would have been hard to do once he achieved fame.

    It seems a quite a few of these performers had one or two hits and lived pretty well off that, which granted is no different from rock. Of course the more hits you had, the better, or if someone else would cover your song, the better too. I wish the series had said how some of these musicians learned how to play, perhaps that's lost in time.

  8. #108
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    I enjoyed the whole doc. There are hardcore country fans that are up in arms because of a few *snubs, but the thing served its purpose. IWell, Johnny Paycheck and David Allen Coe didn't get mentioned at all. SMH.

  9. #109
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    I never really thought there was much difference in Dolly Parton's earlier 70s hits and the rock-approved 'singer songwriters'. And of course the link to country in the early Sun Records 'rock n roll' is very obvious.



    He did covers of the same sort of material they did later. But of course early on Nelson wrote various 'standards' of his own- 'Funny How Time Slips Away', 'Crazy' etc.
    I've heard everything by Willie up to Red Headed Stranger. Some of those 60s albums are great but there are one or two from the late 60s that are pure schlock, like "In My Own Pecular Way." You won't here a steel guitar or a Telecaster on that album, but you'll get horn sections and string sections....

    And yet, a few years later he hits it outta the park with...SHOTGUN WILLIE.

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3LockBox View Post
    Hee Haw was an abomination. My parents watched it. I hated it.
    I liked it. I wasn't at all into country back then but shit, we had Buck Owen's and Roy Clark hosting the thing. I liked the show. It was hilarious, and the music was good. WTF.

  11. #111
    I finished watching the documentary this morning.. based on previous post I doubt many here watched much past the 4 episode.. overall I give it two thumbs up.. Ken does a good job with these.. I've seen the Baseball one guess I should see what else he's done..

  12. #112
    Quote Originally Posted by happytheman View Post
    I finished watching the documentary this morning.. based on previous post I doubt many here watched much past the 4 episode.. overall I give it two thumbs up.. Ken does a good job with these.. I've seen the Baseball one guess I should see what else he's done..
    His Vietnam is fantastic. He does a great job on everything.

  13. #113
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    We watched the 50s - 60s episodes this weekend. I love the quote about Hank Sr., "Boy, you got a million dollar voice and a ten cent mind." I think we still have to finish '68 - '72 followed by '73-'83. It's definitely in the period where country was everything I couldn't stand so it's tough sledding. Hey Tammy, stop fucking whining. You made bad choices. Because of my wife, I have seen Coal Miner's Daughter more than a couple times. The movie made it seem like there was a bigger age gap between Moon and Loretta when really it was only six years. I didn't like Loretta's music but damn, she's still cool.

    I was disappointed in the late 50s when they mentioned the prevalence of story songs but only had a small bit about Marty Robbins and nothing about Johnny Horton. The only country 8 track my dad had that I could stand was Johnny Horton's Greatest Hits (although it was only "Sink the Bismarck", Battle of New Orleans", and "North to Alaska" that I really liked). No one remembers Johnny Horton.

    I really liked the stuff about Willie Nelson's early days as a songwriter. I would bet he still makes enough off of "Crazy" to cover his weed usage.
    Last edited by Jerjo; 2 Weeks Ago at 02:07 PM.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  14. #114
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    Here's four outlaws

    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  15. #115
    Geriatric Anomaly progeezer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by saucyjackstl View Post
    His Vietnam is fantastic. He does a great job on everything.
    As someone who served both on ships and "in country" in Vietnam, IMO Ken Burns Vietnam series is absolutely the only Vietnam War reportage I've ever seen ANYWHERE that got it at least close to right.
    "My choice early in life was either to be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politician, and to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference"

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  16. #116
    You have to watch "The Civil War."
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  17. #117
    Speaking of Willie Nelson, my friend just posted the illustration he did of him.



    The dude is an amazing illustrator. One of the best in the world. He has work in the Smithsonian.
    Last edited by ronmac; 2 Weeks Ago at 09:04 PM.
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  18. #118
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo
    I was disappointed in the late 50s when they mentioned the prevalence of story songs but only had a small bit about Marty Robbins and nothing about Johnny Horton. The only country 8 track my dad had that I could stand was Johnny Horton's Greatest Hits (although it was only "Sink the Bismarck", Battle of New Orleans", and "North to Alaska" that I really liked). No one remembers Johnny Horton.
    I like Johnny Horton's songs and have a hit collection of his on CD. I have even more Marty Robbins. Story songs are the greatest.

    ^That's a great picture of Willie. Didn't the Who have a song about Pictures of Willie? Or something like that

    Another takeaway from the Burns' doc: Jessi Colter is still looking good.
    Can this be the swan song? The final elbow?

  19. #119
    Here's hoping Burns does a doc on the blues.
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  20. #120
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    Here's hoping Burns does a doc on the blues.
    Not a fan of the Scorcese doc?

    I wonder how many nights one would need to do a decent version on rock? And how many hoops would you have to jump through to get the licensing rights for the music?
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  21. #121
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    Not a fan of the Scorcese doc?
    I forgot about that one, but have not seen it. Bill Wyman's is excellent, though, although a lot shorter.
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  22. #122
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    The movie made it seem like there was a bigger age gap between Moon and Loretta when really it was only six years. I didn't like Loretta's music but damn, she's still cool.

    I really liked the stuff about Willie Nelson's early days as a songwriter. I would bet he still makes enough off of "Crazy" to cover his weed usage.
    Yeah, that's not bad for rural country people, heck, people still marry like that today, particularly the trophy wife thing. At least they were from different families.

  23. #123
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post

    I wonder how many nights one would need to do a decent version on rock? And how many hoops would you have to jump through to get the licensing rights for the music?
    It's been done several times, not by Ken Burns, obviously, but I know I've seen a few different documentary shows on the history of rock n roll. There was one I remember seeing back in the early 80's. I think I might have on a bootleg DVD someone gave me, which I never got around to sitting down and watching properly. I believe it was narrated by Jeff Bridges. I also rmeember a show hosted by some English chick, that was the first place I remember hearing Gerry And The Pacemakers.

    Then there was one done by VH-1 or PBS, I think, during the 90's, where the only mention of prog rock was as a prelude to talking about punk, where they've got Lenny Kaye, I believe talking about how "Rock wasn't fun anymore". I dispute that claim, but anyway...they show a few seconds of Wakeman from that Journey To The Center Of The Earth video, I believe, apparently intending to demonstrate how "overblown" or "preposterous" rock music had gotten by the mid 70's. Yeah, whatever. I think that one ended with a discussion of grunge and techno, and naturally completely bypassed the 80's, except talk about MTV, I believe.

    Then there was another one by VH-1 about 15 years ago, called The Seven Ages Of Rock or something like that. That one for someone skipped over the 50's and early 60's, I think they decided to start with the British Invasion.

    THen you got that metal mini-series VH-1 Classic aired about 7 or 8 yeras ago, which wasn't bad, if you don't mind them showing a photo of the wrong prog rock keyboardist when talking about Wakeman's overdubs on Sabra Cadabara (which were apparently only mentioned to demonstrate how Sabbath were "getting away from straight metal" or whatever the frell). And I could have lived without the snot nosed comment about Grateful Dead in the grunge episode.

  24. #124
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    Been listening to Hank Thompson. Not a household name but a Texas, honky tonk hero none the less. There's a Texas swing thing there.

  25. #125
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    Been binging on The Hag. His 60s albums are great.

    Jumped to Brad Paisely. It neo-traditional. It's got the trinity (steel, Tele, fiddle) but it's modern honky tonk. Brad is a hell of a Tele player.

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