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Thread: Billy Sherwood talks about his long history with Yes

  1. #26
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by happytheman View Post
    I also recall Bill telling of how Anderson was constantly on everybodies backs to write stuff.. Somewhere along the way I've heard it said Jon would come in bashing about on a guitar 2-3 chords saying.. "this is what we're going to do until someone else comes up with something better.. all but forcing the bands hand to getting involved.. I will agree with you that sometimes conflict ends up bringing the best out of a group of people shooting for a common answer..
    I think Peter Banks said once they would come up with more complicated arrangements simply as a preventative measure so that JA's very crude ideas weren't the final result!
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulrus View Post
    Which just goes to fuel the opinion that it's the internal conflicts and tensions within a band that lead to the best creative results. I can recall from the YesYears documentary Bill Bruford saying "We ONLY ever disagreed." And ironically, perhaps that's a contributing factor of why so many vintage bands can't reproduce the brilliance of their glory days; they've gotten themselves to a place where everything is happiness and sunshine and they don't have to fight for their ideas anymore. Add to that you've reduced the band down to 2 or 3 long time members and the new, younger guys aren't going to fight for their ideas.
    Yeah definitely, when you consider CTTE, Fragile and the Yes Album especially. I recall some of Bruford's comments, making fun of Anderson's inability to actually play the guitar he would strum to come up with ideas on and such. The arguments over every last note in that era surely led to some brilliant music.

    I'm a big fan of the first two albums with Peter Banks. I dig his guitar work on those early albums. I wish he had made another album with Yes in that classic era. His sound was much more rooted in the prog pscyh era that gave birth to Yes. His runs on those early songs bring a lot of energy to the music and the compositions.

  3. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by abhorsen View Post
    Yeah definitely, when you consider CTTE, Fragile and the Yes Album especially. I recall some of Bruford's comments, making fun of Anderson's inability to actually play the guitar he would strum to come up with ideas on and such. The arguments over every last note in that era surely led to some brilliant music.

    I'm a big fan of the first two albums with Peter Banks. I dig his guitar work on those early albums. I wish he had made another album with Yes in that classic era. His sound was much more rooted in the prog pscyh era that gave birth to Yes. His runs on those early songs bring a lot of energy to the music and the compositions.
    It was years before I heard Two Sides to Peter Banks or in my case the twofer Flash/In the Can. Lot's of good riffs on those releases.. I've never understood the Yes purist who overlook or outright cock their legs on the first two Yes albums.. I played TaaW and The Yes Album way more than than any other Yes release when I first got turned onto the band. And when I finally got a hold of the first release I found Survival / Looking Around to fit comfortably under the classic Yes label. I guess that's why I was the only guy in our group of high school friends to buy Yesterdays when it came out..

  4. #29
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    Definitely! Those first two records are very much classic Yes and Yesterdays will always be my favorite compilation from the band. Just a really nice selection to go along with America.

  5. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by abhorsen View Post
    Definitely! Those first two records are very much classic Yes and Yesterdays will always be my favorite compilation from the band. Just a really nice selection to go along with America.
    "Yesterdays" is a great compilation, but most of the tracks other than "America" sound like they were run through a phase shifter and sound very thin. It gets worse as the album goes on. "Survival" is almost buried in phasing. On the original albums the songs sound fine. Then they remastered all these songs in 1994. I don't understand why they didn't recompile it with the better sounding tracks from the original albums when remastering. I've never been able to get to the bottom of this and I never hear anyone comment on it, which is strange because it's so obvious.

  6. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by jamesmanzi View Post
    I assume Igor looked appropriately dour while playing all these songs he had nothing to do with, and Alan was careful not to look like he "had anything to do with" Roundabout, yes?
    Since nothing they were doing at the time stood out as unusual, I have no memory of them doing anything except playing. There's a reason that Sherwood stood out the way I related it. It's not that he didn't play the Trevor Rabin part well - he did. It just came across as an out-of-place showcase moment. Mileage varies.
    No matter what anyone says, you are the decider of how you will listen to music.

  7. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by the winter tree View Post
    "Yesterdays" is a great compilation, but most of the tracks other than "America" sound like they were run through a phase shifter and sound very thin.

    I think this was tinkering by Eddie Offord. This just from some vague memory, I don't have anything to back this up so feel free to disregard.

  8. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by abhorsen View Post
    Definitely! Those first two records are very much classic Yes and Yesterdays will always be my favorite compilation from the band. Just a really nice selection to go along with America.
    Big fan of those first two Yes albums in the way that I like those early Floyd albums.

  9. #34
    Thanks for posting - a nice set of comments from Sherwood. Seems like a nice fellow. I am hoping this group will record something with Sherwood as the bass player, I would like to see if he brings anything fresh to the band as the bass player on record. Looking back at the times when Yes have brought in replacement players, in many cases it opened up a new set of sounds/styles. Moving from Peter Banks to Steve Howe gave them a different sound for sure. Bruford to White, Kaye to Wakeman, Wakeman to Moraz, Howe to Rabin. Each of those players had their own set of influences and style. Tony Levin on the ABWH record did not sound very much like Chris Squire but I thought he brought a fresh sound to that record.

    But when I hear Sherwood play Yes music on the bass - it's a remarkable facsimile of Chris Squire. Perhaps that will change if it's new material - I hope so. As the years pass, I think Sherwood is actually starting to look more like Chris Squire. The hair, the stage clothes. He does not look as if he is taking good care of his health/fitness. Perhaps this is one Chris Squire trait he should not wish to emulate.

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