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Thread: On the merits of the bands alone......

  1. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by mogrooves View Post
    I have no real recollection of Sha Na Na; either I was asleep or prowling the grounds, waiting for Jimi.

    re: Sha Na Na : https://www.pri.org/stories/2019-08-...t-unlikely-act



    This, I've always suspected, was precisely the problem. A LOT of people who knew nothing of the festival, and heard of it only at the last minute, jumped into their cars with only the clothes on their backs and $3 in their pockets and headed to Bethel in droves, clogging the roads, thinking they'd catch the show on Friday night and then go home. They got there and got stuck.

    Most everyone I knew who made it to the festival had a great time. I do know some, though, who were miserable pretty much the whole time. As we walked to the site, there were plenty of people coming the other way.

    I'd been to large anti-war demonstrations and, by extrapolation, figured there were a lot of "us" out there. But Woodstock clinched it. I heard more then one person say, "Just think of how many people didn't make it!"

    There's no way to understate the siege mentality that existed in Nixon's Amerika. For detractors who insist that Woodstock was just apolitical escapism for middle class (mostly white) kids, I submit--in full recognition of the contradictions in the counterculture of the Sixties, and the exploitative role of corporate capitalism--that there is a "politics of pleasure," and that our very togetherness was not only inherently political... it was a threat.
    Thanks for this post. Nothing more to add.

  2. #27
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deacon Beaker View Post
    On second thought, I likely did NOT know of CSN&Y so early on.

    (I had the Young "Everyone Knows This is Nowhere" lp long before I had CSN-same lp - and both were released in '69.)
    During one of the song intros, one of the three (Neil was sitting out due to the cameras) said, "This is our first time playing together, man! We're scared s***less!!"
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  3. #28
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    I've always hated outdoor shows, festivals, etc. Hot, sweaty, thirsty, dirty, headache-inducing.

    The only outdoor show I ever really enjoyed was Pink Floyd at the Milwaukee County Stadium back in '77.
    Prog's Not Dead

  4. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    During one of the song intros, one of the three (Neil was sitting out due to the cameras) said, "This is our first time playing together, man! We're scared s***less!!"
    Yeah, I remember that. David Crosby said once that "just about everyone in the business that they cared about was backstage, saying 'Good album, but can you guys do pull it off live?'" so that apparently was messing with their heads. As I recall, they're pretty terrible, Stills forgets the words to Suite: Judy Blue Eyes, and as one observer noted, "Forget about singing in a different key, Crosby sounds like he's singing in a different state!".

    (actually, given Cros' subsequent issues with drugs, it's quite likely he was in "a different state", but possibly not in the manner the author of that commentary meant)

  5. #30
    cunning linguist 3LockBox's Avatar
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    "The '60s happened mostly in the '70s" - I don't know who said that but its probably true. I was way too young then. Years later I saw the film and saw nothing that made me wish I was there. I've seen a couple of indepth docs on the subject and while I appreciate it for the cultural phenomenon it was/is I can't imagine enjoying being there. I think there were plenty of other festivals I would rather have attended (as someone already mentioned; in hindsight).

  6. #31
    Yes.

    The performances of the Airplane and C.J. & the Fish (full band) would have been adequate draw for me. Parts of Hendrix' act was sloppy, but then again it usually was by then. The Dead were apparently sucky. Sanatana and Mountain were solid. ISB are said to have behaved terribly, but their set list was cool. I would have seen Leonard C., Tim Hardin and Melanie. And I would've danced to Sha-na-na and Sly.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  7. #32
    cunning linguist 3LockBox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissors
    And I would've danced to Sha-na-na
    Not that I'm saying one can't enjoy Sha-Na-Na but the inclusion of this act in that festival must have been a real WTF moment for most in attendance that day.

  8. #33
    ^Absolutely, but these were the days when Miles Davis would appear on the same bill as the Grateful Dead at the Fillmore, when Donovan would play for two hours solo and then be relieved by a three-hour appearance of the Third Ear Band improvising over a scale merging Elgar and Shankar.

    Sha-Na-Na were so "out" they were ice cool. It pays to remember how folks in their early-to-mid-20s in 1969 would still have fair childhood memories of vocal 'wop from a decade previously.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  9. #34
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Stills forgets the words to Suite: Judy Blue Eyes
    Even more funny when one considers he's the one who wrote Suite: Judy Blue Eyes.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  10. #35
    cunning linguist 3LockBox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Sha-Na-Na were so "out" they were ice cool. It pays to remember how folks in their early-to-mid-20s in 1969 would still have fair childhood memories of vocal 'wop from a decade previously.
    I'll take your word for it. My earliest memory of them was Grease and a silly-ass TV show that came on after the Muppets. But I can see how a musically open-minded and herbally enhanced youth could embrace them.

  11. #36
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3LockBox View Post
    there were plenty of other festivals I would rather have attended.
    Those late 60s UK festival line-ups give me wood!
    Hell, they ain't even old-timey ! - Homer Stokes

  12. #37
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    ^The 1969/70 Isle Of Wight festivals had some of the bigger names that Woodstock did not get. And it's a pity there was no professional recordings made of the Bath festival.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bath_F...gressive_Music

    I'm a fan of 50s/early 60s rock/doo-wop, but not so much Sha Na Na's deliberately campy revival schtick. Proto-Showaddywaddy, high praise indeed!

    Most of the rest of what was in the film holds up well, IMHO. Never much cared for that 'Love March' Butterfield thing on the original triple album, though.
    Last edited by JJ88; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:50 AM.

  13. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    ^Absolutely, but these were the days when Miles Davis would appear on the same bill as the Grateful Dead at the Fillmore, when Donovan would play for two hours solo and then be relieved by a three-hour appearance of the Third Ear Band improvising over a scale merging Elgar and Shankar.

    Sha-Na-Na were so "out" they were ice cool. It pays to remember how folks in their early-to-mid-20s in 1969 would still have fair childhood memories of vocal 'wop from a decade previously.
    Miles opened for the Dead (and other rock and pop artists) because of Bill Graham. Graham was fond of sticking performers from an earlier era on in front of the currently popular rock acts, with the intention of exposing them to younger audiences. So he'd do stuff like sticking Chubby Checker on in front of Fleetwood Mac or The Jefferson Airplane. I also recall once seeing an album of pipe organist Virgil Fox, I believe, doing a set of Bach recorded live at one of the Fillmores, though I'm not sure who he'd have been opening for.

    As for Sha-Na-Na, my understanding is they were popular on the NY club circuit (though Wikipedia says "they started performing in 1969", so their career was, at best, only a few months long at the time of Woodstock), so that's apparently why they were included, again, with the apparent logic that the organizers were playing to what they were expecting their audience to be, i.e. local upstate NY people.
    My earliest memory of them was Grease and a silly-ass TV show that came on after the Muppets.
    Same for me. I didn't even know Sha-Na-Na was an actual musical act that had performed in the 60's. I think the first time I realized that they actually existed before the TV show was when I read an article on a blues guitarist who used a Flying V that had previously belonged to one of Sha-Na-Na's early guitarists (who had passed away in the early 70's). Then I saw the movie a couple years after that, and thought "Wait, WHAT?!".
    Last edited by GuitarGeek; 2 Weeks Ago at 01:43 PM.

  14. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    I also recall once seeing an album of pipe organist Virgil Fox, I believe, doing a set of Bach recorded live at one of the Fillmores, though I'm not sure who he'd have been opening for.
    I found a NY Times review of Virgil Fox at the Fillmore East on December 1, 1970. Another site says the Fillmore East bill that night was the Kinks, Love and Quartermass, so maybe Fox had a separate show.

  15. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by pb2015 View Post
    I found a NY Times review of Virgil Fox at the Fillmore East on December 1, 1970. Another site says the Fillmore East bill that night was the Kinks, Love and Quartermass, so maybe Fox had a separate show.
    Wow, ok, so maybe you had to cough up 10 bucks (highway robbery, or so some of the fans were saying at the time) instead of just a fiver (which a lot of people at the time, also thought was highway robbery!), but you could have seen Virgil Fox and the short lived Quatermass on the same day?! And The Kinks and Love?! Man, I was born in the wrong decade!

    (But if I had been born in the right decade, I'd have probably either gotten sent to Vietnam, or ended up dying from AIDS during the 80's).

  16. #41
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pb2015 View Post
    ... the Fillmore East bill that night was the Kinks, Love and Quartermass, so maybe Fox had a separate show.
    I attended this show that weekend; Fox wasn't there on that night. He may have played on one of the other nights or earlier in the late afternoon. The Brothers Davies were loaded!
    Hell, they ain't even old-timey ! - Homer Stokes

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