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Thread: Post-Dio Rainbow

  1. #26
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    You can, alas, draw a line from the likes of 'Difficult To Cure' (the track) to Yngwie Malmsteen.

    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    but it was still strange to hear him listening to the Chateau tapes in 1975, many years before they were released in any form!
    Were they bootlegged, anyone know?

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yves View Post
    Saw them on the SBTE tour. They gave a great show but were upstaged by the opening act: Scorpions (touring the album Blackout). I never really bothered getting any of the albums.
    I also saw the "SBTE" tour. My one and only time seeing them. One of the loudest concerts I have ever seen to this day. It was fricking loud that the sound was a muddy mess. The show was cool, but it was so loud my girlfriend at the time only made it through about half of it then went out to the lobby of the arena to wait out the rest. I left before the encore. On this tour they were also a bit upstaged by a very young and hungry Iron Maiden. They did a short set, but kicked the ass out of the place.

  3. #28
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    ^I could imagine...just as Van Halen were said to have wiped the floor with Black Sabbath when those two toured together in 1978.

  4. #29
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    Re: The Tull Chateau tapes:

    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    Were they bootlegged, anyone know?
    I don't recall the studio sessions being bootlegged, but I know Tull briefly played a couple of the tracks live around 1973, Audition and No Rehearsal if memory serves, and those could have been bootlegged. I am curious for sure though, how anyone could be listening to those studio tracks in 1975, when they did not surface until 1988!
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  5. #30
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    Blackmood felt he had to break cheap Strats all over the place to recompensate the fans that did stay until the end of the show.
    He would occasionally break a real Strat for having the nerve to go out of tune. His anger issues are notorious to this day.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  6. #31
    Member dropforge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    Any other fans of this era?
    Yep! Own 'em all.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Even the Dio albums had the odd stinker to them.
    Disagree.

    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    None of the post-Dio hold a candle to Rising, RBR, LLRNR.
    Agree. The first three are far and away the best, but I regard '80s Rainbow as a different band (the lineups are different except for RB), and I like their sound, too.

  7. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    You can, alas, draw a line from the likes of 'Difficult To Cure' (the track) to Yngwie Malmsteen.
    ?
    Oh geez, what the frell would Malmsteen had done if Blackmore hadn't existed?

    I Remember one of the guitar magazines back in the 90's doing a piece that sort of sarcastically pointed out that Yngwie might in fact be a clone of Ritchie (perhaps some sort of weird Nazi plan gone awry?!). They used two pictures, one of each guitarist, and pointed out the similarities: both playing Strats with scalloped fingerboards, middle pickup lowered down (this was before Fender put out the Blackmore model that doesn't even have a middle pickup), "curly cues" of strings around the machine heads, and in the case of these two photos they were both wearing the same style black leather fringe jacket.

    They also pointed out that both guitarists favored Marshalls (well, Ritchie did before he switched in the 90's), both had "classical overtones" to their playing, both had worked with Graham Bonnett and Joe Lynn Turner (and in each case, Ritchie worked with the given vocalist first), and both were infamously temperamental and incapable of keeping a stable band lineup together.

    re: Chateau tapes being used on a Rainbow documentary,

    What are we talking about? The Jethro Tull Chateau D'isaster tapes? You can insert any music you like when you're making a documentary. Typically when you're interviewing someone for TV or a film project, you have them in a quiet room, and later, you dub whatever you want in to accompany the commentary. That's probably what you have here.

  8. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    You can, alas, draw a line from the likes of 'Difficult To Cure' (the track) to Yngwie Malmsteen.
    ?
    Oh geez, what the frell would Malmsteen had done if Blackmore hadn't existed?

    I Remember one of the guitar magazines back in the 90's doing a piece that sort of sarcastically pointed out that Yngwie might in fact be a clone of Ritchie (perhaps some sort of weird Nazi plan gone awry?!). They used two pictures, one of each guitarist, and pointed out the similarities: both playing Strats with scalloped fingerboards, middle pickup lowered down (this was before Fender put out the Blackmore model that doesn't even have a middle pickup), "curly cues" of strings around the machine heads, and in the case of these two photos they were both wearing the same style black leather fringe jacket.

    They also pointed out that both guitarists favored Marshalls (well, Ritchie did before he switched in the 90's), both had "classical overtones" to their playing, both had worked with Graham Bonnett and Joe Lynn Turner (and in each case, Ritchie worked with the given vocalist first), and both were infamously temperamental and incapable of keeping a stable band lineup together.

    In the mid 90's, Yngwie put out a covers album, and half the songs were from Deep Purple and Rainbow.

    don't recall the studio sessions being bootlegged, but I know Tull briefly played a couple of the tracks live around 1973, Audition and No Rehearsal if memory serves, and those could have been bootlegged. I am curious for sure though, how anyone could be listening to those studio tracks in 1975, when they did not surface until 1988!
    Are we sure that the example in this Rainbow documentary wasn't a case of the music being dubbed on afterwards by the production team? Or is the music in question definitely ambient sound recorded while Ritchie was being interviewed in 1975?
    Last edited by GuitarGeek; 08-16-2019 at 04:23 PM.

  9. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    Mostly Autumn seemed to appear in most of those DVD documentaries- not that I ever bought any of them, just their names on the back covers! They had a label in common at the time (Classic Rock Productions) and Mostly Autumn got a hard sell from them. Really put me off in fact, all those 'Is this the new Pink Floyd?' adverts in magazines etc.
    Yeah, I have a couple DVD's that were put out by Classic Rock Productions, and each has "trailer" of sorts for Mostly Autumn, among the "bonus" features. I think this was around the time they were using Roger Dean and Rodney Mathews artwork without either artist's permission, etc.

    As I recall, they put out a series of DVD documentaries about a lot of bands, each of which featured commentary from people not at all connected to the band, including (surprise!) members of Mostly Autumn. And they used very short audio clips, because apparently if it's under 10 seconds or whatever, you don't have to pay a royalty. So they just dumped a mother frelling dren load of cheap documentaries on the market, and I think the ones that I looked at on Amazon, almost uniformly had bad reviews.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    What are we talking about? The Jethro Tull Chateau D'isaster tapes?
    No, the Roger Whittaker Chateau D'isaster tapes.
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  11. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by The_Lurker View Post
    "Anybody There" and "Snowman." Not shredders. A bit more atmospheric pieces. The latter has a bit of a Planet P vibe to it. You can find both on YouTube and/or Spotify.
    Interesting that you invoke Planet P, since Planet P was basically Rising era Rainbow's former keyboardist, Tony Carey. Funny thing about that: Carey basically was carrying on two careers at the time. On the one hand, he was putting out records as Planet P, which were sort of slightly Pink Floyd sounding. I've got a pink vinyl double LP copy of his ambitious concept album, Pink World. As I recall he basically played all the instruments on those records. And of course, some might remember the hit Why Me, which was on the previous Planet P record.

    But at the same time, he was also putting out records under his own name, which were more mainstream sounding, closer to a Springsteen/Mellencamp/whatever vibe. In that context, he had a hit called Fine Fine Day. And it's funny to me that I needed this to be pointed out to be in a music magazine at the time (though Tony couldn't contractually appear in any of the Planet P videos, he was able to do interviews to promote Planet P, where it was fully disclosed who he was), I hear the songs now, and it's very obviously the same guy singing the lead vocals on Fine Fine Day, as well as Why Me, Behind The Barrier, What I See, etc.

  12. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    No, the Roger Whittaker Chateau D'isaster tapes.
    You said you heard "The chateau tapes", that could mean almost anything, so I asked a legitimate frelling question, before I saw the other comments where it was made obvious that you were talking about Tull.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    You said you heard "The chateau tapes", that could mean almost anything, so I asked a legitimate frelling question, before I saw the other comments where it was made obvious that you were talking about Tull.

    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    During one of Ritchie's interviews from 1975, there's Tull playing in the background, and one of the songs is from the Chateau tapes! That was really surprising to hear.
    I shall endeavour to be more clear in the future.
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  14. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    Were they bootlegged, anyone know?
    There has been a bootleg around for a while of one possible side of the Chateau album, including "Sailor," which was never played live or officially released until the Passion Play box set a few years ago.

  15. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Halmyre View Post
    I've seen other interviews where he expressed a liking for Tull. Pity he and Anderson didn't work together earlier but I assume politics and the presence of Martin Barre got in the way.
    Don Airey said that Richie ordered him to see Tull when they were performing in town when Rainbow had a night off.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by pb2015 View Post
    Don Airey said that Richie ordered him to see Tull when they were performing in town when Rainbow had a night off.
    ...and then he later joined the band for a year! I asked him about his days with Tull when I interviewed him.
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  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    No, the Roger Whittaker Chateau D'isaster tapes.
    I'm quite fond of 'The Last Farewell' but this did make me chuckle!

  18. #43
    From Epic Prog, duh The_Lurker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Interesting that you invoke Planet P, since Planet P was basically Rising era Rainbow's former keyboardist, Tony Carey. Funny thing about that: Carey basically was carrying on two careers at the time. On the one hand, he was putting out records as Planet P, which were sort of slightly Pink Floyd sounding. I've got a pink vinyl double LP copy of his ambitious concept album, Pink World. As I recall he basically played all the instruments on those records. And of course, some might remember the hit Why Me, which was on the previous Planet P record.

    But at the same time, he was also putting out records under his own name, which were more mainstream sounding, closer to a Springsteen/Mellencamp/whatever vibe. In that context, he had a hit called Fine Fine Day. And it's funny to me that I needed this to be pointed out to be in a music magazine at the time (though Tony couldn't contractually appear in any of the Planet P videos, he was able to do interviews to promote Planet P, where it was fully disclosed who he was), I hear the songs now, and it's very obviously the same guy singing the lead vocals on Fine Fine Day, as well as Why Me, Behind The Barrier, What I See, etc.
    Yeah, it's not surprising that Snowman had a Planet P vibe to me and, as I'm a huge TC fan, I'm more than aware of his career. I spent a lot of time on eBay hunting down several of his out-of-print CDs and I have some of his original Go Out Dancing demos that one of his old website operators posted in mp3 format (apparently without his permission, as it turned out and I believe they had a huge falling out over it or something...I exchanged some emails with the guy many years ago). Those GOD demos were great and it took forever to get some of those songs released officially.
    Just an ex-internet DJ who still loves prog.

  19. #44
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Lurker View Post
    "Anybody There" and "Snowman." Not shredders. A bit more atmospheric pieces. The latter has a bit of a Planet P vibe to it. You can find both on YouTube and/or Spotify.
    You just killed my interest , but I'll investifgate anyhow

    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    He would occasionally break a real Strat for having the nerve to go out of tune. His anger issues are notorious to this day.
    Well, I think it was also pure showmanship as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    Disagree.
    Do you close your ears too??
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    Do you close your ears too??



  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Lurker View Post
    Yeah, it's not surprising that Snowman had a Planet P vibe to me and, as I'm a huge TC fan, I'm more than aware of his career. I spent a lot of time on eBay hunting down several of his out-of-print CDs and I have some of his original Go Out Dancing demos that one of his old website operators posted in mp3 format (apparently without his permission, as it turned out and I believe they had a huge falling out over it or something...I exchanged some emails with the guy many years ago). Those GOD demos were great and it took forever to get some of those songs released officially.
    Tony's an incredible talent, a guy blessed with a fine singing voice, a multi-instrumentalist, and one unafraid to indulge rock, electronic and prog — all at the same time via various pseudonyms. Some Tough City and IWBHT are great rock records. Pink World is (still) the best Planet P Project series, but they're all good, though I wouldn't recommend them to Trane.

  22. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    Disagree.






    Ok.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
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  23. #48
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post




    But that track is really a stinker...

    Never understood how the band could stretch it to 15-minutes and make it an encore

    I'm not finding any poor tracks on their debut, only one on Rising (Eyes), but on LLRnR, there are a couple of duds, IMHO : the last there tracks of the album, though neither are as bad as Eyes, but Rainbow Eyes is really awful (at least on a Rainbow album)
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  24. #49
    Long Live was never a very good album, IMO. And Blackmore was hardly more than a mediocre songwriter himself, as far as I'm concerned. While I'm no longer too crazy about his guitarplaying either, he was effective in some instances - and he had a 'mark' of his own there. But his attemptive forays into "more serious" musics was and is embarrassing, I think. I believe I must have attended some 8-900 concerts in my life, and that Blackmore's Night endeavour I was forced to see/hear all those many years ago was possibly among the 20-or-so most pitifully kitschy endeavours I've ever had to endure.

    Big breasts though, and that always counts for something.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  25. #50
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    I think that 2cd anthology Catch The Rainbow pretty much nails their best work. I played it again recently and it's very well compiled, a disc of Dio and another one with the Bonnet/JLT material. A few of the single tracks like 'Jealous Lover' and 'Weiss Heim' are on there too.

    Even Rising (their best album) has a dud in the shape of 'Do You Close Your Eyes'. I can't believe they even played that thing live, it screams filler.

    Last time I played that Germany 1976 live album, the version of 'Stargazer' held up better than I remembered (although it's admittedly 'noodly'). Not sure why they didn't include it on the On Stage double album, that's not much over an hour as it stands! Always felt that track was by far their peak. 'A Light In The Black' doesn't seem to have been a set-list regular.

    Blackmore's Night has always been a must to avoid for me, I'm afraid.
    Last edited by JJ88; 08-17-2019 at 07:22 AM.

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