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Thread: Finders Keepers taking on the NWW List

  1. #1

    Finders Keepers taking on the NWW List

    So again...probably not going to be of widespread interest on these shores but a few folks may find this interesting (frankly, I'm slightly surprised no one has tackled this before...probably a real licensing adventure though!).

    Finders Keepers (label) is releasing a series of compilations of artists from the Nurse with Wound list. First volume is due for September and already ready for preorder: https://finderskeepersrecords.bandca...ist-volume-one

    If you're not sure what the NWW list is and why you might (or might not) care, here you go: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nurse_with_Wound_list

    Quite a few of these names will be familiar to folks here, and probably aren't nearly as obscure as they were back then...but still, if nothing else these could be some very interesting/cool compilations and launchpads for exploring "new old" names. And Finders Keepers generally does a pretty good to excellent job with their releases IMHO.

    And hey, if you're not caring about compilations but ready to start springing for full albums from the list? I know a guy who just might have you covered: http://www.waysidemusic.com/Music-De...ound-List.aspx
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  2. #2
    Boo! walt's Avatar
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    Article in The Quietus re: this and future releases.

    https://thequietus.com/articles/2682...inders-keepers
    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

  3. #3
    QUIT STEALING MY THUNDER, WALT




    (really great article, thanks for sharing sir )
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  4. #4
    ^ John, if I contribute to this thread, do you think it'll be awarded a one-star rating?
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  5. #5
    Sounds like an experiment worth tackling, I say!!
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  6. #6
    Boo! walt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    QUIT STEALING MY THUNDER, WALT




    (really great article, thanks for sharing sir )
    I apologize.It's the heat,it's baking what little brain i have.
    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

  7. #7
    Fry half your brain and you're still gonna outpace me, sir
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  8. #8
    One of the most bizarre items on the list is Ys - Il Balletto Di Bronzo. I mean you expect the more experimental stuff from Italy like Area or Pierrot Lunaire but Ys? Who would have ever listened to Ys back then, even more appreciate it?

  9. #9
    Apparently either Fothergill or Stapleton did!
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    One of the most bizarre items on the list is Ys - Il Balletto Di Bronzo. I mean you expect the more experimental stuff from Italy like Area or Pierrot Lunaire but Ys? Who would have ever listened to Ys back then, even more appreciate it?
    I actually disagree quite a bit.

    When I discovered Japanese lofi-noiserock during the early 90s, one of the most interesting aspects was their well of otherwise unlikely influences - unlikely due to the sheer obscurity of names. On the PSF-label (Psychedelic Speed Freaks), for instance, I found excellent bands like High Rise and White Heaven (both from Tokyo-Yokohama), who kept mentioning names like Color Humano and Le Cofradia De La Flor Solar among their relevant sources, both of whom were practically unheard of anywhre else but in their native Argentina until retrowaves were starting to happen with the onset of CD-reissues in the mid-90s.

    Il Balletto di Bronzo's Ys was always regarded as a somewhat radical rendition of the Italian 70s heavy-progressive concept; its impenetrably bleak and esoteric tone as well as its sense of charge and immense attack - it didn't really "fit in" with the pastoral or dreamy nor the more abstract experimentalism of the avant-garde purveyors. Rather it was seen as a forerunner of gothic spacerock or even noiserock on its own terms, and that information could still be felt later on. Of course there's a wholly different question to the matter; from where did Stapleton get the tip about anything as exotic as Ys in the first place? From the same sort of cultural logistic which brought him Annexus Quam or Catherine Ribeiro or whatever, I assume.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  11. #11
    (not his real name) no.nine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Of course there's a wholly different question to the matter; from where did Stapleton get the tip about anything as exotic as Ys in the first place? From the same sort of cultural logistic which brought him Annexus Quam or Catherine Ribeiro or whatever, I assume.
    I've read that Stapleton was always a voracious record collector, scouring the used bins for anything which looked like the music would be unusual, strange or inscrutable. He'd buy things he'd never heard of just based on instinct. So that could be it. I'm not sure how much he was ever into Italian Prog per se, but it's possible he just ran across YS and figured it looked promising.
    "I tah dah nur!" - Ike

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    I actually disagree quite a bit.

    When I discovered Japanese lofi-noiserock during the early 90s, one of the most interesting aspects was their well of otherwise unlikely influences - unlikely due to the sheer obscurity of names. On the PSF-label (Psychedelic Speed Freaks), for instance, I found excellent bands like High Rise and White Heaven (both from Tokyo-Yokohama), who kept mentioning names like Color Humano and Le Cofradia De La Flor Solar among their relevant sources, both of whom were practically unheard of anywhre else but in their native Argentina until retrowaves were starting to happen with the onset of CD-reissues in the mid-90s.

    Il Balletto di Bronzo's Ys was always regarded as a somewhat radical rendition of the Italian 70s heavy-progressive concept; its impenetrably bleak and esoteric tone as well as its sense of charge and immense attack - it didn't really "fit in" with the pastoral or dreamy nor the more abstract experimentalism of the avant-garde purveyors. Rather it was seen as a forerunner of gothic spacerock or even noiserock on its own terms, and that information could still be felt later on. Of course there's a wholly different question to the matter; from where did Stapleton get the tip about anything as exotic as Ys in the first place? From the same sort of cultural logistic which brought him Annexus Quam or Catherine Ribeiro or whatever, I assume.
    I don't see where we really disagree: of course Ys is radical, but more in the way of intensity than anything else. This is not the Maladetti or Gudrun, not some extra-sophisticated experiment. Hell, even sympho people dig this.

    But the main source of surprise is that someone was even aware of Ys existence before all the reissues in year 1980. Unless it was some sort of an Italian mega-hit that I didn't know about.

  13. #13
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    I was aware of the NWW list from early on in my collecting, but never paid any attention to it. Same with Julian Cope's tome. What year was the NWW list compiled?
    He did not know that the sword he'd hold, would turn his priceless empire into fool's gold...

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  14. #14
    It was included with their first album in 1979.
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  15. #15
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    ^ Thx.

  16. #16
    Most artists on the NWW list (or lists as the To The Quiet Men From A Tiny Girl album had another one on its own) are already reissued or widely available on YT. So I don't see any point for a compilation release.
    Macht das ohr auf!

    COSMIC EYE RECORDS

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    But the main source of surprise is that someone was even aware of Ys existence before all the reissues in year 1980. Unless it was some sort of an Italian mega-hit that I didn't know about.
    Fothergill & Stapleton were based in England, with access to wider information sources (concerning rock music) than the average euro fan. Hell, I knew people in Greece knowing Atoll, Ribeiro or Arbete oh Fritid in the early 80s; few of them also had records... So for me it's more expectable from Stapleton to be familiar with Balletto di Bronzo (released by Polydor) than Moolah or Seesselberg (real, real obcurities for 1980) f.e.
    Macht das ohr auf!

    COSMIC EYE RECORDS

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by spacefreak View Post
    So for me it's more expectable from Stapleton to be familiar with Balletto di Bronzo (released by Polydor) than Moolah or Seesselberg (real, real obcurities for 1980) f.e.
    Correct me if I am wrong Spyros, but stylistically I don't see any item on the list that is similar to Ys. To me this record can be discussed along stuff like Cervello, Osanna or Semiramis, none of which is on rhe list. Hence my surprise.

    Anyway, the list is a great argument in favor of a broader conception of progressive rock, and historically speaking much too early appearing. Someone understood already in the 80's the great undercurrent that unites it all.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    Correct me if I am wrong Spyros, but stylistically I don't see any item on the list that is similar to Ys. To me this record can be discussed along stuff like Cervello, Osanna or Semiramis, none of which is on rhe list. Hence my surprise. .
    There are many items on both NWW lists that stand merely on their own. Both Fothergill & Stapleton admitted that they were buying records that looked to them weird without knowing anything about them beforehand. Also, I remember reading a Stapleton interview concerning the making of the list, claiming that some of the artists included are for the sake of merely one track and not full albums (Dies Irae seems to me one of such cases).
    Macht das ohr auf!

    COSMIC EYE RECORDS

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by spacefreak View Post
    There are many items on both NWW lists that stand merely on their own. Both Fothergill & Stapleton admitted that they were buying records that looked to them weird without knowing anything about them beforehand. Also, I remember reading a Stapleton interview concerning the making of the list, claiming that some of the artists included are for the sake of merely one track and not full albums (Dies Irae seems to me one of such cases).
    ok, makes sense. Cheers!

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra
    I don't see where we really disagree: of course Ys is radical, but more in the way of intensity than anything else. This is not the Maladetti or Gudrun, not some extra-sophisticated experiment. Hell, even sympho people dig this.
    Even staying within the Italian section of the NWW list, the inclusion of Capsicum Red or Hero always puzzled me much more than Ys. While nice enough, both are musically very far from the experimental nature of most other names in the list. At least, Ys breaks the symphonic rock formula, in its own way, while Capsicum Red is just typical classical rock Italian-style.

    Quote Originally Posted by spacefreak
    Both Fothergill & Stapleton admitted that they were buying records that looked to them weird without knowing anything about them beforehand.
    Still my favorite way of getting to know new music!

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    Listening to Igor Wakhevitch right now, and it makes me wonder how Stapleton was able to a) hear about all of it and b) acquire the material. Some of this must have been very hard to come by back then (late 70s/early 80s), a point which probably asserts the theory that Stapleton was a highly keen collector and, obviously, interestée. Quite intriguing to see Lard Free, Krokodil (An Invisible World Revealed), Catherine Ribeiro, Plastic People of the Universe and Il Balletto di Bronzo next to each other, but they truly fit that way within the given context of "radical" popular (?) music.

    Someone should write a book on this list.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by spacefreak View Post
    Most artists on the NWW list (or lists as the To The Quiet Men From A Tiny Girl album had another one on its own) are already reissued or widely available on YT. So I don't see any point for a compilation release
    Well, “we” are probably not the target audience for such a release. I’m thinking it’s more geared to people who are dipping their toes into more “out” sounds via labels like Finders Keepers, Light In The Attic, Feeding Tube, Companion, etc., and places like The Quietus, Pitchfork, and others.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Levgan View Post
    the inclusion of Capsicum Red or Hero always puzzled me much more than Ys. While nice enough
    To be fair, both of these feature admittedly among the Italian 70s releases I personally really don't appreciate. It makes me think that perhaps it wasn't about Stapleton discovering "extremes" altogether but rather simply grabbing at the obscure.

    As for IBdB's Ys I found that on the list of noise-rock connoisseurs already during the early 90s, with folks like Keiji Haino mentioning it as a favourite. At the time I'd only heard Sirio 2222, which somehow fit sonically alongside Keiji's band, Fushitsusha, yet it surprised me on listening to Ys. It'a a grand piece of work, of course.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  25. #25
    Member TheH's Avatar
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    I think the rather poor Album by Capsicum Red is remembered only through "Red" Canzian (who is a Pop Star in Italy, "I Pooh") being on it. Or maybe by some
    Beethoven fans ("Patetica").

    Ys is a masterpiece of Prog though.

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