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Thread: Elephant9

  1. #26
    Member Kcrimso's Avatar
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    Dunno. I have Walk The Nile and Atlantis but am not so impressed. Great musicians but compositions just aren't very interesting. And I don't like production of those albums at all. Way too compressed.
    "A waste of talent and electricity." John Peel on ELP

  2. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    So does vol.2 have Fiske on the entire recording? And vol. 1 is without him yes?
    Vol 1 is trio, but I think there is a trio track in vol2 too.

    This is like Dave Stewart joining forces with Keith Emerson in a orgy of Hammond organ.

  3. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Kcrimso View Post
    Dunno. I have Walk The Nile and Atlantis but am not so impressed. Great musicians but compositions just aren't very interesting. And I don't like production of those albums at all. Way too compressed.
    I wasn't too impressed with earlier stuff either, maybe I need to relisten.

  4. #29
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  5. #30
    I love the first two albums. They seemed to me like an almost perfect amalgm of Emerson doing the Barbarian with deep groove psyched out space rock. It's a fairly recondite musical seam, but they mine it brilliantly, & I am psyched, so to speak, for this new release, all the more so having heard this track.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    Vol 1 is trio, but I think there is a trio track in vol2 too.

    This is like Dave Stewart joining forces with Keith Emerson in a orgy of Hammond organ.
    All stuff on vol. 2 is played by the whole quartet.

  7. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    All stuff on vol. 2 is played by the whole quartet.
    ok sir, thanks for the correction.

    EDIT: my local retailer brings this next week, so very soon I can see the credits and answer to all these mind-boggling questions.
    Last edited by Zappathustra; 4 Weeks Ago at 04:16 AM.

  8. #33
    Member Jay.Dee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    I saw them play 3 of the 4 Oslo concerts recorded for the Psychedelic Backfire live albums this January. They're fantastic musicians and really nice guys. Henry Kaiser attended those gigs too, by the way.
    I haven't been aware they have two new live CDs up for sale, but... it took me only a few seconds to go to the RG site and order them immediately!

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay.Dee View Post
    I haven't been aware they have two new live CDs up for sale, but... it took me only a few seconds to go to the RG site and order them immediately!
    They kick ass immensely - especially the second disc with Fiske.
    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    They kick ass immensely - especially the second disc with Fiske.
    That's exactly what I need in my collection's contemporary jamz section. So far I have only had a few live sets by Medeski, Martin, Wood & A Guitarist, or Zony Mash to kick my butt, but let's be frank; I still could sit comfortably after the listening session. These two ass-kickers should keep me standing upright for some time!

  11. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    They kick ass immensely - especially the second disc with Fiske.
    The energy they're playing with it's like there's no tomorrow. By far their best release. (it's only 2 days away that I am getting this and bombard the whole block full volume on my stereo).

  12. #37
    I ordered Atlantis and The greatest show on earth and I am enjoying them a lot. Atlantis is more heavy space jam and the greatest show is more structured. 'ELP gone avant' I read earlier in this thread. Seems to fit.

    The drummer is a monster and that keyboard player I have seen with Supersilent; still one of the most memorable shows I have ever seen.

    I already know I will get the other albums at one point.

  13. #38
    Listening to Vol 1 right now. Absolutely loving it. Take a Hammond grunge groove, then drive the pulse to ever higher degrees of warped intensity. Magic!

  14. #39
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    TBH, since last year's album, E9 has now stopped to be an auto-buy, though that one is slightly different-sounding.

    I'm listening to Silver Mountains this morning, and it's very fine, but it's been done before (by them most notable ) and it's too much of improvisation/Jam type of music (minimal songwriting).

    If I do buy the Psych Backfire, it will be the one with Fiske in the band, but it's low priority for now.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  15. #40
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    I have listened a few times to Psychedelic Backfire I and it's a grower for me. Although I'd expected some serious ass-kick jamming I wasn't really prepared for it and it took me some time to get used to their relentless methodology.

    At first I was a bit afraid it would be a sort of Niacin live, you know, a classic prog/fusion organ trio that get on stage to pummel the listener with their virtuosic chops, but after a while I began to see to notice and savour a lot of structures and textures incorporated into the flow of their improvisations. The stuff seemingly inspired by minimalism, Miles fusion bands, Lifetime, Soft Machine, motorik Krautrock, and even some 90s post-rock. A whole lot is going on musically during those stretched out jams.

    I haven't bought any of their studio stuff, only occasionally streamed it when someone was raving about the band on forums, so I am very glad that they finally decided to document their live act (on CD! - Rune Grammofon seem to have finally come to senses with the release format policy for live recordings).
    Last edited by Jay.Dee; 2 Weeks Ago at 07:29 AM.

  16. #41
    I've grabbed a bunch of shows off Dime,but haven't had time to listen to any of them.
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  17. #42
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    Quite surprising, but the addition of the guitarist on the second volume of Psychedelic Backfire makes the music less unremittingly intensive and more "unhurriedly" jammy (in contrast to the previous volume's display of progressive organ techniques). I didn't remember that Fiske's guitar melded so organically with the keyboard sounds, so at times I wondered who actually was playing what during long improvised sequences. No typical fusion guitar solo heroics to be found here, which is frankly speaking quite refreshing.

    Great stuff.

  18. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay.Dee View Post
    Quite surprising, but the addition of the guitarist on the second volume of Psychedelic Backfire makes the music less unremittingly intensive and more "unhurriedly" jammy (in contrast to the previous volume's display of progressive organ techniques). I didn't remember that Fiske's guitar melded so organically with the keyboard sounds, so at times I wondered who actually was playing what during long improvised sequences. No typical fusion guitar solo heroics to be found here, which is frankly speaking quite refreshing.

    Great stuff.
    Refine Fiske has been on earlier E9 albums, but his style is not a "dominant" kinda guitar thing, so you're perspective is spot-on.

    Not to toot my horn, but I was actually partly responsible for this collaboration, which began back in 2012. I was asked to curate a Norwegian series at the 2012 Kongsberg Jazz Festival (All About Jazz Presents: Doing It Norway...the only thing I regret about the opportunity ) and I wanted to bring E9, amongst others. But since they had played the festival relatively recently, I asked if they'd be interested in inviting a guest. They said yes.

    I suggested violinist Ola Kvernberg, which I still think would have been killer, but they suggested Reine Fiske, and one of my underlying philosophies when booking this series was that if I asked any artist to do something different to their usual thing, I would give them complete freedom to choose, as long as it wasn't beyond the budget.

    And, based on their show with Reine, it was a good decision...they did a late night show and totally smoked the place, and it has led to an ongoing relationship, including 2012's Atlantis, 2015's Silver Mountain and, now, Psychedelic Backfire I.

    But I still look back on that seven-show series (Elephant9 with guest Reine Fiske; Eple Trio with guest Karl Seglem; Arve Henriksen percussion trio, with Helge Norbakken and Audun Kleive; Jon Blake Magnetic Book...Magnetic North Orchestra plus a six-piece Baroque ensemble; Mats Eilertsen SkyDive Quintet; a double duo bill featuring Eivind Aarset/Thomas Strønen and Stian Westerhus/Sidsel Endresen; and Per Jørgensen & Friends, with Morten Qvenild, Sigbjørn Apeland, Morten Skage and Terje Isungset) with great fondness. To have been asked to program a series was a privilege, period. To be able to work with some of the artists to do something they'd not done before (Aarset/Strønen; E9/Fiske; Per Jørgensen, who wrote an entire book of music for this newly minted lineup) was a real thrill. And to see the shows - six at the town's Energimolle, and one at a nearby church - not only draw big crowds, but to be told by people in town that it was one of the best programs they'd ever seen at the festival made it a real high point in my life.
    Last edited by jkelman; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:42 PM.
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  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkelman View Post
    Refine Fiske has been on earlier E9 albums, but his style is not a "dominant" kinda guitar thing, so you're perspective is spot-on.

    Not to toot my horn, but I was actually partly responsible for this collaboration, which began back in 2012. I was asked to curate a Norwegian series at the 2012 Kongsberg Jazz Festival (All About Jazz Presents: Doing It Norway...the only thing I regret about the opportunity ) and I wanted to bring E9, amongst others. But since they had played the festival relatively recently, I asked if they'd be interested in inviting a guest. They said yes.

    I suggested violinist Ola Kvernberg, which I still think would have been killer, but they suggested Reine Fiske, and one of my underlying philosophies when booking this series was that if I asked any artist to do something different to their usual thing, I would give them complete freedom to choose, as long as it wasn't beyond the budget.

    And, based on their show with Reine, it was a good decision...they did a late night show and totally smoked the place, and it has led to an ongoing relationship, including 2012's Atlantis, 2015's Silver Mountain and, now, Psychedelic Backfire I.

    But I still look back on that seven-show series (Elephant9 with guest Reine Fiske; Eple Trio with guest Karl Seglem; Arve Henriksen percussion trio, with Helge Norbakken and Audun Kleive; Jon Blake Magnetic Book...Magnetic North Orchestra plus a six-piece Baroque ensemble; Mats Eilertsen SkyDive Quintet; a double duo bill featuring Eivind Aarset/Thomas Strønen and Stian Westerhus/Sidsel Endresen; and Per Jørgensen & Friends, with Morten Qvenild, Sigbjørn Apeland, Morten Skage and Terje Isungset) with great fondness. To have been asked to program a series was a privilege, period. To be able to work with some of the artists to do something they'd not done before (Aarset/Strønen; E9/Fiske; Per Jørgensen, who wrote an entire book of music for this newly minted lineup) was a real thrill. And to see the shows - six at the town's Energimolle, and one at a nearby church - not only draw big crowds, but to be told by people in town that it was one of the best programs they'd ever seen at the festival made it a real high point in my life.
    Great story.

  20. #45
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay.Dee View Post
    Quite surprising, but the addition of the guitarist on the second volume of Psychedelic Backfire makes the music less unremittingly intensive and more "unhurriedly" jammy (in contrast to the previous volume's display of progressive organ techniques). I didn't remember that Fiske's guitar melded so organically with the keyboard sounds, so at times I wondered who actually was playing what during long improvised sequences. No typical fusion guitar solo heroics to be found here, which is frankly speaking quite refreshing.

    Great stuff.
    Reine Fiske is the Landberk guitarist and is better known for setting atmosphere (melancholic or bucolic) rather than guitar-hero histrionics.

    FTM, his presence in Paatos (along with Stefan Dimle also a Landberk dude) gave their debut the charm that none of the rest of the band's album have.

    In some ways, maybe E9 deserved a more flamboyant guitarist than Fiske to "fight" their Emersonian-type of KBist.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  21. #46
    Member Jay.Dee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkelman View Post
    But I still look back on that seven-show series (Elephant9 with guest Reine Fiske; Eple Trio with guest Karl Seglem; Arve Henriksen percussion trio, with Helge Norbakken and Audun Kleive; Jon Blake Magnetic Book...Magnetic North Orchestra plus a six-piece Baroque ensemble; Mats Eilertsen SkyDive Quintet; a double duo bill featuring Eivind Aarset/Thomas Strønen and Stian Westerhus/Sidsel Endresen; and Per Jørgensen & Friends, with Morten Qvenild, Sigbjørn Apeland, Morten Skage and Terje Isungset) with great fondness. To have been asked to program a series was a privilege, period. To be able to work with some of the artists to do something they'd not done before (Aarset/Strønen; E9/Fiske; Per Jørgensen, who wrote an entire book of music for this newly minted lineup) was a real thrill. And to see the shows - six at the town's Energimolle, and one at a nearby church - not only draw big crowds, but to be told by people in town that it was one of the best programs they'd ever seen at the festival made it a real high point in my life.
    Thanks for sharing!

    I suppose the whole event got recorded, so now you should talk the organizers and artists into releasing the tapes in the form of a nice CD box!
    Last edited by Jay.Dee; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:53 AM.

  22. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    Reine Fiske is the Landberk guitarist and is better known for setting atmosphere (melancholic or bucolic) rather than guitar-hero histrionics. […] maybe E9 deserved a more flamboyant guitarist than Fiske to "fight" their Emersonian-type of KBist.
    Fiske was picked for his strengths as exposed in the music of Dungen, The Amazing and with Swedish cult-folksinger Turid, as well as for his contributions to Motorpsycho. The guy pretty much redefined the craft of Scandinavian melodic rock guitar in the first two mentioned. Landberk (as well as Paatos), on the other hand, are apparently unknown to just about anyone involved except for Fiske himself.

    But I certainly don't think Elephant9 would have benefiitted (fitte!) from "[…] a more flamboyant guitarist". Ståle Storløkken, the band's keyboardist, is the the greatest rock/jazz player on his instrument here in Norway, a man with four decades of experience jamming alongside the biggest names in jazz up here but with an additional flair for "prog" wizardry. You wouldn't find a single player to challenge that guy - not on keys, nor on axe - so why bother. Fiske fits right in.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
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  23. #48
    Member Jay.Dee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    In some ways, maybe E9 deserved a more flamboyant guitarist than Fiske to "fight" their Emersonian-type of KBist.
    Ivar Grydeland would be an interesting option to consider. He is also a texture-oriented guitarist, but with edgier and rougher sound choices. Not sure whether he'd be at ease in such a prog/fusion style though.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Fiske was picked for his strengths as exposed in the music of Dungen, The Amazing and with Swedish cult-folksinger Turid
    I (knowingly) heard Reine Fiske first in The Amazing a decade ago and his playing immediately attracted my attention:


  25. #50
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    I prefer E9 without Reine...


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    "A waste of talent and electricity." John Peel on ELP

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