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Thread: YES RNRHOF Bass Failure

  1. #51
    PE Thread Failure

  2. #52
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    Dave Grohl obviously thinks enough of the Gedster's performance to chauffer him around the town of Richmond Hill, Ontario.

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    Two boys have been found rubbing linseed oil into the school cormorant.

  3. #53
    [QUOTE=Yodelgoat;906308]
    Geddy was a great choice for Yes in the RRHOF. IMO Yes and Rush both make the RRHOF almost worth visiting one day. I used to drive by it almost every day when I was contracting in Findlay, Ohio for 6 months back in 2003. I never had even a slight interest in paying to go into that cursed place, when most of the bands I loved at the time were purposefully excluded, because one individual a-hole didn't think they were cool enough. It still pisses me off when I think about it.
    I don't see why Yes and Rush being inducted would change that view. The museum itself is pretty much as it always has been. For me, having the Schoolmaster marrionette from the live presentation of The Wall stare me down as I came up the escalator made the visit worth it. There was also seeing Neil Young's "guitar amp" (obviously a prop, but if you're familiar with the Rust Never Sleeps stage show, you know what I'm talking about), Roger McGuinn's "light show" Rickenbacker (a presumably one of a kind custom guitar, with lights that flashed in time with one's playing, which McGuinn used for late 60's era Byrds encores), Janis Joplin's psychedelic painted Porsche (I think it was a Porsche), and Eric Clapton's Cream era SG (or possibly a replica, hard to tell). They also had a wall of drumsticks, autographed very nearly any living (at the time) drummer that you could want to see acknowledged, including many of the greats of jazz, like Elvin Jones and Rashied Ali.

    Also, there was a bit of correspondence between Jan Wenner and Hunter S. Thompson when the latter was writing for Rolling Stone. One letter from Thompson begins, "Dear Jan, You drug infested hippie bastard!". Well, I thought it was amusing.

    There was also, at the time, a wall of psychedelic era LP covers, includign albums from the likes of Tomorrow, The Soft Machine, and I forget who else.

    So to me, it's a pretty cool place. I don't know if any of that stuff is still on display,b ut I imagine they've got all kinds of all cool stuff on display even now.

  4. #54
    [QUOTE=GuitarGeek;906396]
    Quote Originally Posted by Yodelgoat View Post


    I don't see why Yes and Rush being inducted would change that view. The museum itself is pretty much as it always has been. For me, having the Schoolmaster marrionette from the live presentation of The Wall stare me down as I came up the escalator made the visit worth it. There was also seeing Neil Young's "guitar amp" (obviously a prop, but if you're familiar with the Rust Never Sleeps stage show, you know what I'm talking about), Roger McGuinn's "light show" Rickenbacker (a presumably one of a kind custom guitar, with lights that flashed in time with one's playing, which McGuinn used for late 60's era Byrds encores), Janis Joplin's psychedelic painted Porsche (I think it was a Porsche), and Eric Clapton's Cream era SG (or possibly a replica, hard to tell). They also had a wall of drumsticks, autographed very nearly any living (at the time) drummer that you could want to see acknowledged, including many of the greats of jazz, like Elvin Jones and Rashied Ali.

    Also, there was a bit of correspondence between Jan Wenner and Hunter S. Thompson when the latter was writing for Rolling Stone. One letter from Thompson begins, "Dear Jan, You drug infested hippie bastard!". Well, I thought it was amusing.

    There was also, at the time, a wall of psychedelic era LP covers, includign albums from the likes of Tomorrow, The Soft Machine, and I forget who else.

    So to me, it's a pretty cool place. I don't know if any of that stuff is still on display,b ut I imagine they've got all kinds of all cool stuff on display even now.
    Sounds like you were there same year we were.. The Paul Simon exhibit was cool.. I loved the whole experience.. and would go back just to see the Yes exhibit..

  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    They also had a wall of drumsticks, autographed very nearly any living (at the time) drummer that you could want to see acknowledged, including many of the greats of jazz, like Elvin Jones and Rashied Ali.
    Was Bill Bruford one of them?
    Man you guys take awfully seriously a bunch of pampered, spoiled twenty and thirty something year old jocks earning millions of dollars to play a game running up and down a field. Why do you care so much about these guys to the point of arguing with each other. Do you think they care an iota about you?

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  6. #56
    Member gearHed289's Avatar
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    Well THAT was amusing!

  7. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    ....and Eric Clapton's Cream era SG (or possibly a replica, hard to tell).
    I am pretty sure it’s the original, if that’s the one they named “The Fool” and which ended up with Todd. I think Todd donated and someone has now made him a replica which he has played occasionally in recent tours.

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Also, Geddy is a little more famous than Billy, whether anyone likes it or not. So you get a bit extra bit of PR by saying you had an all star jam with "Rush bassist Geddy Lee joining Yes" or whatever, which outfits like the Hall Of Fame just love.

    I've never actually heard the performance in question, so I don't know what it sounded like. But I imagine Geddy did a fine job, and I'm reasonably sure using a Rick or any other make and model of bass would have changed that.

    I mean, it's like kvetching that Geddy didn't break out his Ricky when Rush played the old material on later tours.
    That's how I saw it too. Rush were influenced by Yes and got into the RRHOF perhaps "out of turn" so in classic RRHOF fashion, it was more about big names than any other consideration. I was actually surprised he didn't play a Ric since he of course used to but no biggie for me.

  9. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek; View Post

    Eric Clapton's Cream era SG (or possibly a replica, hard to tell). They also had a wall of drumsticks, autographed very nearly any living (at the time) drummer that you could want to see acknowledged, including many of the greats of jazz, like Elvin Jones and Rashied Ali.
    Quote Originally Posted by Painter View Post
    Was Bill Bruford one of them?
    I seem to remember him and Alan White were both represented, along witht he Grateful Dead and Allman Brothres Band drummers. My memory is that every drummer I could think of, they had a pair of sticks signed by him. At the time, I don't think I thought to look for someone like Lee Kerslake or Bill Ward, but I know I saw a lot of my favorite drummers represented.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sunlight Caller View Post
    I am pretty sure it’s the original, if that’s the one they named “The Fool” and which ended up with Todd. I think Todd donated and someone has now made him a replica which he has played occasionally in recent tours.
    See, now I've been wondering about that, because I remember reading about that in Guitar Player back in the 80's, and how Rundgren owned it. But then some years back, I brought that up in whichever online forum, and was told it was just an urban legend, and the guitar that Rundgren had been seen playing was a copy. But I can see how both could be true. I've just always wondered how the guitar came into Todd's possession.
    Last edited by GuitarGeek; 1 Week Ago at 11:17 AM.

  10. #60
    I recently read Todd’s biography, and I’m sure he mentions that he gave the original to the museum and a fan made him a copy. I’ll dig the book out and find the reference later.

  11. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by 3RDegree_Robert View Post
    That's how I saw it too. Rush were influenced by Yes and got into the RRHOF perhaps "out of turn" so in classic RRHOF fashion, it was more about big names than any other consideration. I was actually surprised he didn't play a Ric since he of course used to but no biggie for me.
    When was the last time we actually saw Geddy playing a Ricky? If I remember correctly, he started using a Steinberger on the Grace Under Pressure tour, and I remember at the time, reading that he still liked to use the 4001 on the old stuff, but then I think after that tour I believe he stopped using the 4001 onstage altogether.

  12. #62
    Member Firth's Avatar
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    In case this has not been heard:
    https://youtu.be/8_hAhzdk-h8



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    “[They] agreed that it was neither possible nor necessary to educate people who never questioned anything.”

  13. #63
    I thought it was fun & Geddy was happy to honor a big influence. Pretty simple, I'd say.
    Sleeping at home is killing the hotel business!

  14. #64
    Member Firth's Avatar
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    YES RNRHOF Bass Failure

    And the real thing:




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    https://youtu.be/UVL-DtFNXuM
    Last edited by Firth; 1 Week Ago at 01:26 PM.
    “[They] agreed that it was neither possible nor necessary to educate people who never questioned anything.”

  15. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by wilcox660 View Post
    I thought it was fun & Geddy was happy to honor a big influence. Pretty simple, I'd say.
    ^ This.

  16. #66
    Occipital Provocatee Plasmatopia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firth View Post
    In case this has not been heard:
    https://youtu.be/8_hAhzdk-h8



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    Kind of a weird mix all around. Hard to tell how much of the bass sound was attributable to Geddy's guitar, amp, or the sound man.
    Just sitting at home rocking back and forth and jealously caressing my invisible collection of theoretical assets.

  17. #67
    Just put it on real speakers... I couldn't hear Geddy in the mix. Jon Anderson sounded overall pretty weak, and Howe threw a real boner in on the quiet interlude. When I saw him during the Tour where they did Close to the edge in its entirety, he was stupendous/flawless. I couldn't believe just how spot on he was. This performance was not their finest hour, and Geddy or his bass tone, was definitely not the weak link. Someone really needed to do those high Squire harmonies and tell Alan White his hi tom fill didn't work at all - He is not Bill Bruford.

    Last week I was at the Sprint store and the guy tried to sell me a Harmon Carden Speaker to play my tunes from my phone, He asked my what I listened to. Yes popped in my head and he said "never heard of 'em" but proceeded to pull up Roundabout. He cranked it and the whole store seemed to turn around and listened (maybe 30 people) It was decent sounding, and a few people asked who that was... That was cool. People at the RRHOF got an ear full of stink if what I heard on the YouTube was what they heard. I can imagine some old rich turd saying to his drunk wife "Muffy - who let this riff-raff into the RRHOF???" - It was not Yes' finest moment. Rush sounded great at their induction.

    As for the Harmon Carden - No overpriced sale was made that day.
    I got nothin'

    ...avoiding any implication that I have ever entertained a cognizant thought.

  18. #68
    cunning linguist 3LockBox's Avatar
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    I would have been ok if Sherwood had played at the induction. But it was awesome that Geddy sat it, and we all can use some awesome.

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  19. #69
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    [QUOTE=GuitarGeek;906396]
    Quote Originally Posted by Yodelgoat View Post


    I don't see why Yes and Rush being inducted would change that view. The museum itself is pretty much as it always has been. For me, having the Schoolmaster marrionette from the live presentation of The Wall stare me down as I came up the escalator made the visit worth it. There was also seeing Neil Young's "guitar amp" (obviously a prop, but if you're familiar with the Rust Never Sleeps stage show, you know what I'm talking about), Roger McGuinn's "light show" Rickenbacker (a presumably one of a kind custom guitar, with lights that flashed in time with one's playing, which McGuinn used for late 60's era Byrds encores), Janis Joplin's psychedelic painted Porsche (I think it was a Porsche), and Eric Clapton's Cream era SG (or possibly a replica, hard to tell). They also had a wall of drumsticks, autographed very nearly any living (at the time) drummer that you could want to see acknowledged, including many of the greats of jazz, like Elvin Jones and Rashied Ali.

    Also, there was a bit of correspondence between Jan Wenner and Hunter S. Thompson when the latter was writing for Rolling Stone. One letter from Thompson begins, "Dear Jan, You drug infested hippie bastard!". Well, I thought it was amusing.

    There was also, at the time, a wall of psychedelic era LP covers, includign albums from the likes of Tomorrow, The Soft Machine, and I forget who else.

    So to me, it's a pretty cool place. I don't know if any of that stuff is still on display,b ut I imagine they've got all kinds of all cool stuff on display even now.
    I enjoyed the place significantly more than I expected. Only went because it was free for me to do so. I’d gladly go again.

  20. #70
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    There are two live versions of Roundabout that spring to mind when thinking of the 'best' available versions. Do we agree on this, at least?



    Two boys have been found rubbing linseed oil into the school cormorant.

  21. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    When was the last time we actually saw Geddy playing a Ricky? If I remember correctly, he started using a Steinberger on the Grace Under Pressure tour, and I remember at the time, reading that he still liked to use the 4001 on the old stuff, but then I think after that tour I believe he stopped using the 4001 onstage altogether.
    I think on the Signals tour he bounced back and forth but I think on GUP he was all Steinberger. Power Windows too. For Hold Your Fire he was using the Wals.

  22. #72
    The initial post on this thread is the most ridiculous prog snob comment I've seen in a while on here. I love prog but it's no wonder prog fans get a bad rap with silly attitudes like this
    Last edited by Cygnus74; 1 Week Ago at 01:49 AM. Reason: clarification of opinion

  23. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    See, now I've been wondering about that, because I remember reading about that in Guitar Player back in the 80's, and how Rundgren owned it. But then some years back, I brought that up in whichever online forum, and was told it was just an urban legend, and the guitar that Rundgren had been seen playing was a copy. But I can see how both could be true. I've just always wondered how the guitar came into Todd's possession.
    I found this interview with Todd where he speaks about the work he had done to the guitar, it was definitely the Clapton axe that he had. He talks about his replacement copy too. There is also an interesting Wiki page for the guitar.



    Todd sold it for $150k to pay a tax bill and donated some to Clapton's charity. So it's not clear if the one in the museum is the original or yet another copy.

  24. #74
    Occipital Provocatee Plasmatopia's Avatar
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    Just sitting at home rocking back and forth and jealously caressing my invisible collection of theoretical assets.

  25. #75

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