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Thread: Gary Moore

  1. #26
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    I discovered Gary Moore at age 15 in 1978 when the BBC broadcast Sight & Sound in Concert with Colosseum II.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BwvzYvyBZT4

    I was blown away by this performance and got Wardance and then Electric Savage which I still think are the best things he ever did to this day. A few years later when he released Corridors Of Power I managed to get front row for his first headline show at Hammersmith Odeon, of course he had changed style by then and I followed him for a while longer but gradually lost interest, not too keen on what I heard from his blues albums either.

    After his death I discovered that he lived near Brighton (quite local to me) and is buried in the village of Rottingdean, whenever I'm over that way I visit the churchyard to pay my respects. RIP Gary, thanks for the music.

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  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by kid_runningfox View Post
    That really where he lost me - the cod- 'Oirishness' of that album was so cornily cheesy that I still find it difficult to take seriously, even taking into account Moore's background. TBH, Thin Lizzy just did that sort of thing way better than Moore ever managed - as did bands like Hosrlips.
    I get that it was kind of cheesy, but I think that is what I liked about it. I don't know, it just struck the right chord for me at the time, but it has I have to admit it has been years since I have listened to it.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Man, I would have loved to have seen the Black Rose tour. As I said earlier, that's my favorite Thin Lizzy album, I bet they were awesome. I think about the only Thin Lizzy show I would have liked to have seen more was when they opened for Queen (which, I believe also had Gary on guitar, who had been recalled after Brian Robertson broke his hand in a bar brawl).
    deo]
    They were the opening act for Journey, so it was only an hour set, but they totally kicked ass. It always amazed me that Lizzy never got bigger than they did in the U.S.

  4. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    They were the opening act for Journey, so it was only an hour set, but they totally kicked ass. It always amazed me that Lizzy never got bigger than they did in the U.S.
    It was an absolute crime that Thin Lizzy wasn't bigger Stateside. The thing is, though they're sort of thought of as a hard rock band, they had poppier things on most of their records that would have been perfect for AM top 40 radio at the time. Things like A Song For When I'm Away, She Knows, Romeo And The Lonely Girl, Southbound, My Sarah, etc could/should have been hits.

    I dunno, maybe their Stateside record companies (they were on three different labels here over the years) couldn't figure out how to "sell" the band. Maybe they were afraid of alienating rock fans if they put too much push on the lighter stuff. Some might even suggest there was an element of racism, but who knows?

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    It was an absolute crime that Thin Lizzy wasn't bigger Stateside. The thing is, though they're sort of thought of as a hard rock band, they had poppier things on most of their records that would have been perfect for AM top 40 radio at the time. Things like A Song For When I'm Away, She Knows, Romeo And The Lonely Girl, Southbound, My Sarah, etc could/should have been hits.

    I dunno, maybe their Stateside record companies (they were on three different labels here over the years) couldn't figure out how to "sell" the band. Maybe they were afraid of alienating rock fans if they put too much push on the lighter stuff. Some might even suggest there was an element of racism, but who knows?
    I think that Lizzy were very much like UFO: both were poised to become absolutely MASSIVE in the US in the mid-late 70s in the manner of bands like Rush and Journey, but both equally had an infallible talent for sabotaging their own careers - not least thanks to petulant guitar players and a liking for the booze and Columbia's finest. Even Lynott eventually admitted that the responsibility for their never completely breaking in the US was entirely their own: they had the opportunity, they just didn't capitalize on it.

  6. #31
    I happen to like his blues work. Sure, it's too white and a bit over the top. But you cannot deny that his playing is pretty great. "Still Got the Blues" is one of the great blues guitar riffs.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by kid_runningfox View Post
    I think that Lizzy were very much like UFO: both were poised to become absolutely MASSIVE in the US in the mid-late 70s in the manner of bands like Rush and Journey, but both equally had an infallible talent for sabotaging their own careers - not least thanks to petulant guitar players and a liking for the booze and Columbia's finest. Even Lynott eventually admitted that the responsibility for their never completely breaking in the US was entirely their own: they had the opportunity, they just didn't capitalize on it.
    IIRC, Phil fell ill on the eve of a big US tour where Lizzy would have been support. I'm sure that's what kept them from hitting the big time here, because Lizzy should have been huge. Musically, they were unbelievably consistent. I love the last few albums: Black Rose, Chinatown, Renegade, Thunder and Lightning.

  8. #33
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    Johnny the Fox kind of fizzled when it should have blown to pieces the door that Jailbreak had opened. It's kinda inconsistent and not as hard rocking as its predecessor. And then the tour promoting it got postponed for months when Robertson got injured in a bar fight. They never really regained the momentum.

    Gary Moore's solo on Róisín Dubh (Black Rose) is a masterclass in crafting a long melodic solo
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  9. #34
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    Black Rose is not a big favorite. I think Chinatown and Renegade are better records, imo. Besides the title track of Roisin Dube and Waiting For An Alibi, the rest sounds kinda power poppy.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vic2012 View Post
    Black Rose is not a big favorite. I think Chinatown and Renegade are better records, imo. Besides the title track of Roisin Dube and Waiting For An Alibi, the rest sounds kinda power poppy.
    Better spin it again, Vic!


  11. #36
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    Fighting blows away Black Rose.

  12. #37
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    I love this song.


  13. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Vic2012 View Post
    Besides the title track of Roisin Dube and Waiting For An Alibi, the rest sounds kinda power poppy.
    You say that like it's a bad thing. My understanding is that Cheap Trick was "power pop", so if Thin Lizzy falls into that category, that's a good thing, as far as I'm concerned.

    But like I said, they always had that poppy element to their music, e.g. She Knows, Dancing With The Moonlight, Romeo And The Lonely Girl, etc. To me, there was nothing wrong with that. Blue Oyster Cult had lighter stuff too, like Celestial The Queen, Fireworks, Debbie Denise, Mistress Of The Salmon Girl, Redeemed, etc.

    And I suppose Do Anything You Want To sort of has a poppy tone to it, but I think the guitar harmonies and the tympani kinda skew it away from being a "straight" pop song, if you will.
    Fighting blows away Black Rose.
    I would tell you you're crazy, but Fighting is the only one of the 70's era albums I've never owned, so I actually can't comment on that.

  14. #39
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    Fighting is the only one of the 70's era albums I've never owned, so I actually can't comment on that.
    .

    You're crazy. You need that album. It's better than Jailbreak, imo.

  15. #40
    Listening to Run To Cover, right now. This one is from 1985, and in general, I don't think it's as good as it's predecessors. I think probably the best song is Out In The Fields, which was the single. Out In The Fields and Military Man were apparently the last two things Phil Lynott recorded before he passed away.

    Glenn Hughes also appears on several songs, so this furthers the Deep Purple ties to Gary's 80's era music (and the Anglo hard rock scene in general). The other musicians on the record include drummer Paul Thompson (from Roxy Music), and keyboardists Neil Carter and Andy Richards.


    There's way too much keyboards on this record. OK, there's way too much synth. How much of it as actual keyboards and how much is guitar triggered is anybody's guess. I know in the Out In The Fields video Gary is shown playing a Synthaxe, so I suppose some of the synth stuff could be him instead of a keyboardist. And there's also Simmons drums on a couple songs. I like Simmons in the context of synth pop or more electronic oriented music, but not guitar based hard rock. Once In A Lifetime in particular is way too "80's movie soundtrack" sounding.

    Another knock on this album is there is a ballad called Empty Rooms, which was also on Victims Of The Future. Apparently, somebody thought the song was so good, they had to redo for this album. OK, whatever.

    So in general not as good as Corridors Of Power or Victims Of The Future, but not completely awful either. There are the very cool guitar solos on pretty much every song. And the tour for this album was commemorated in the Emerald Aisles concert video/documentary that followed.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    Johnny the Fox kind of fizzled when it should have blown to pieces the door that Jailbreak had opened. It's kinda inconsistent and not as hard rocking as its predecessor.
    I had both at the time. They both got significant airplay in NE Ohio. I prefer Johnny The Fox, but there is a consistency issue. Same as all the Lizzy albums I've heard.
    He did not know that the sword he'd hold, would turn his priceless empire into fool's gold...

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  17. #42
    Thin Lizzy couldn't be pigeonholed enough to have long-term success in the American market.

    As for Moore, I love Still Got the Blues but didn't care much for the blues follow-ups. The hard rock albums never quite got me back in the day. I really need to give them another chance.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vic2012 View Post
    .

    You're crazy. You need that album. It's better than Jailbreak, imo.
    Now you're goin' stir crazy! Not counting "Boys" and the title cut, Jailbreak has "Warrior" AND what's arguably their finest song, "Emerald."

    The Peel Sessions version is the best one.


  19. #44
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    Moore was a great and versatile guitar player; he was completely at home playing jazz/rock fusion (with Colosseum II), heavy rock and blues. Thanks to this thread, I checked out "We Want Moore" on my Apple Music streaming service; he was on fire! I regret that I never got to hear him live. I wasn't crazy about his blues phase, but I'm not that much of a blues fan in general (though I love blues playing when it's mixed in with other elements). And it seems he was more successful with that than other genres he was involved in. When I discovered his work with Colosseum II, I fantasized about how great he would've been with Return To Forever instead of Al DiMeola, who I never cared for despite his technical prowess (and apologies to his fans here, who are many).

  20. #45
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    Now you're goin' stir crazy!
    . I might've exaggerated a little....

    Fighting sounds well produced compared to Jailbreak. Was surprised at how good it is. Definitely better than Thunder & Lightning.

  21. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Vic2012 View Post
    . I might've exaggerated a little....

    Fighting sounds well produced compared to Jailbreak. Was surprised at how good it is. Definitely better than Thunder & Lightning.
    Thunder And Lightning is an awesome album. I was just listening to this morning, on the way to work. Hard to believe they even thought about breaking up after making that record! Contractual obligation, that album isn't!

  22. #47
    Member dropforge's Avatar
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    T&L was probably their best album since Jailbreak.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    T&L was probably their best album since Jailbreak.
    Seriously?

  24. #49
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    Eff, yeah! T&L is ssssmokin'!






  25. #50
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    I have the album but I just don't think it's a good Lizzy album. John Sykes is not a good fit. I'll take Doogie White, or Gary Moore, or Robo, or Eric Bell.

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