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Thread: Arturia Mellotron V

  1. #1
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    Arturia Mellotron V

    I had plans earlier to buy the GForce Mtron Pro. But now I'm thinking about getting Arturia's new Mellotron emulation.

    https://www.arturia.com/products/ana...ron-v/overview

    I'm sure either one would meet my needs (playing the sounds used by King Crimson, Yes, and Genesis). The Arturia software is currently $50 cheaper. It will probably get even cheaper if I wait for one of their special members only sales.


  2. #2
    I've been using the entire V-collection for years. Adding the Mellotron is not too big a deal as there's been a million versions of it from many manufacturers but it should be well done. I didn't upgrade to that last one but may this time.

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    Member Top Cat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soc Prof View Post
    I had plans earlier to buy the GForce Mtron Pro. But now I'm thinking about getting Arturia's new Mellotron emulation.

    https://www.arturia.com/products/ana...ron-v/overview

    I'm sure either one would meet my needs (playing the sounds used by King Crimson, Yes, and Genesis). The Arturia software is currently $50 cheaper. It will probably get even cheaper if I wait for one of their special members only sales.

    I've used GForce Mellotron for years and for fun I checked out the demos of the Mellotron V and to my ears it doesn't get anywhere near as authentic and beautiful sounding as Mellotron Pro. I also have some great Mellotron samples in my Kronos II that sound better.
    I was pretty disappointed that Arturia's version didn't grab me like most Mellotron.
    It's like they modernized it's sound to appeal to a new generation's way of making music, and that's fine. Just not my cup o tea.
    I have Arturia Prophet V and Uhe's Pro5 VST's and love them both, they sound different enough I can use either in songs.
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  4. #4
    Alas at this moment I don't use my Arturia software, because Cubase is complaining about a lack of memory when I use Arturia instruments at this moment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    I've used GForce Mellotron for years and for fun I checked out the demos of the Mellotron V and to my ears it doesn't get anywhere near as authentic and beautiful sounding as Mellotron Pro.
    Thanks for sharing your experience. I should demo them before deciding which one to buy.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    Alas at this moment I don't use my Arturia software, because Cubase is complaining about a lack of memory when I use Arturia instruments at this moment.
    I've been using Cubase since 04 but recently demoed Presonus Studio One Prime and love it so much I went ahead and bought the Artist version. I love it's intuitive feel and visual layout. In some ways it has similarities to Cubase so the learning curve is much easier and it's like they've taken user feedback and tried to integrate much of it into the software. I still have my Cubase 6 but find myself using it less and less.
    While the Artist version is only $99 USD, you need to buy the add one for $79 that allows 3rd party vsts and plug ins. I find I like a lot of the Presonus plug ins a lot better than the standard Cubase ones.


    Quote Originally Posted by Soc Prof View Post
    Thanks for sharing your experience. I should demo them before deciding which one to buy.
    You're welcome.
    To me it all comes down to your ears, if you like what you hear with the Arturia version then go for it.
    The GF version has been sampled meticiously and they even offer the Streetly Tapes as additional libraries.
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    I've been using Cubase since 04 but recently demoed Presonus Studio One Prime and love it so much I went ahead and bought the Artist version. I love it's intuitive feel and visual layout. In some ways it has similarities to Cubase so the learning curve is much easier and it's like they've taken user feedback and tried to integrate much of it into the software. I still have my Cubase 6 but find myself using it less and less.
    While the Artist version is only $99 USD, you need to buy the add one for $79 that allows 3rd party vsts and plug ins. I find I like a lot of the Presonus plug ins a lot better than the standard Cubase ones.
    I use Cubase since 1992, or 1993 I think. What I currently like about it (I use the professional edition) is I can create sheet-music with it. It is my prefered way of working, creating sheet-music on the computer and after that working on it further, so it sounds the way I want it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    I use Cubase since 1992, or 1993 I think. What I currently like about it (I use the professional edition) is I can create sheet-music with it. It is my prefered way of working, creating sheet-music on the computer and after that working on it further, so it sounds the way I want it.
    Yes, I remember our discussing your early embrace of Cubase and Atari software.
    Presonus Studio One 4 Professional does include Notation software for creating sheet-music.
    I understand how once you've learned a certain DAW it's desirable to stick with it, but if you're ever curious check it out.
    For me, it's a fresh start and represents a new phase of my studio and recording for me, since I've downsized a lot of my hardware(still have 6 synths, some analogs) but got rid of my outboard gear like the Lexicons.
    There are a ton of tutorials for Studio One which I really need, because I have trouble focusing on anything for too long, and I've never been able to really dig into Cubase over the years other than the basics.
    But I've already started to learn and do things with Studio One 4 that I never tried with Cubase.

    I really like your music and appreciate your talent, so whatever you're using, keep it up!
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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    Yes, I remember our discussing your early embrace of Cubase and Atari software.
    Presonus Studio One 4 Professional does include Notation software for creating sheet-music.
    I understand how once you've learned a certain DAW it's desirable to stick with it, but if you're ever curious check it out.
    For me, it's a fresh start and represents a new phase of my studio and recording for me, since I've downsized a lot of my hardware(still have 6 synths, some analogs) but got rid of my outboard gear like the Lexicons.
    There are a ton of tutorials for Studio One which I really need, because I have trouble focusing on anything for too long, and I've never been able to really dig into Cubase over the years other than the basics.
    But I've already started to learn and do things with Studio One 4 that I never tried with Cubase.

    I really like your music and appreciate your talent, so whatever you're using, keep it up!
    I'm so used to Cubase, it's pretty hard to think about other software, especially because I'm so used to create sheet-music first, meaning I don't have to play anything. I'm just a composer, not a musician.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    I'm so used to Cubase, it's pretty hard to think about other software, especially because I'm so used to create sheet-music first, meaning I don't have to play anything. I'm just a composer, not a musician.
    I disagree, you ARE a musician.
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  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    I disagree, you ARE a musician.
    I'm not a musician who really plays an instrument.

  12. #12
    Member Top Cat's Avatar
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    you're a 21st century musician who uses a computer keyboard to create music.
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  13. #13
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    M-Tron Pro rules. No need for any more. They have the largest selection of banks available including custom banks (i.e...Banks, Wakeman...).
    The sound is as good as it gets IMHO. G-Force has some great stuff. Try OSCar 2.
    JG

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  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Giant View Post
    M-Tron Pro rules. No need for any more. They have the largest selection of banks available including custom banks (i.e...Banks, Wakeman...).
    The sound is as good as it gets IMHO. G-Force has some great stuff. Try OSCar 2.
    I totally agree.

    That said, I have EX-24 samples I got free from Ontology that sound just as good. There is always that route available to Logic folk.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    you're a 21st century musician who uses a computer keyboard to create music.
    I started composing without a computer. My first composition I wrote at school in Dutch class.

  16. #16
    I don't think I would buy just a software Mellotron. I love the complete package deal from Arturia. The Mellotron is a nice extra, but I can do without.

  17. #17
    I've updated my version of the Arturia software-package and though it doesn't give me the Mellotron and other new instruments themselves, some of the sounds are available in Analog Lab. Actually just 4 Mellotron sounds: Choir, Strings, Strawberry Flutes and some kind of organ. I'm not sure I'm impressed by it. Missing the tape-end, the sounds seem to go on.

  18. #18
    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
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    3-2-1:

    Predictably, I'll be the retro grouch and say...these emulations sound great. They do. And they are very convenient. They take up no physical space. Even the "manual" for the software is virtual. They allow someone with a full computer studio to work smoothly. So streamlined.

    But if you are not there yet, it isn't an easy option. And nothing is more satisfying than playing the real deal--I had a roomie with one back in the day and it was an insanely fascinating machine to be around. Working within the 8 second limit took brains. The keyboard took fingers, strong fingers. Naturally, few of us can aspire to one so again, the software is a great alternative.

    Nowadays, I use my various Korg and Roland modules to produce extremely accurate sounding 'trons. Working with hardware is so intuitive for me. I like that we all have choices and I love seeing folks like you happy with DAWs and soft synths. I love my old, large racks of techno-rubble and that U-shaped set-up of keyboards in my studio. Yes, I can barely move in there (well, it is the big drum set's fault mostly) but I CAN do those Wakeman stretches.

    Another reason I do like and respect soft synths is that I have been able to add to my collection of hardware because of guys switching over.

    All is good.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotron View Post
    3-2-1:

    Predictably, I'll be the retro grouch and say...these emulations sound great. They do. And they are very convenient. They take up no physical space. Even the "manual" for the software is virtual. They allow someone with a full computer studio to work smoothly. So streamlined.

    But if you are not there yet, it isn't an easy option. And nothing is more satisfying than playing the real deal--I had a roomie with one back in the day and it was an insanely fascinating machine to be around. Working within the 8 second limit took brains. The keyboard took fingers, strong fingers. Naturally, few of us can aspire to one so again, the software is a great alternative.

    Nowadays, I use my various Korg and Roland modules to produce extremely accurate sounding 'trons. Working with hardware is so intuitive for me. I like that we all have choices and I love seeing folks like you happy with DAWs and soft synths. I love my old, large racks of techno-rubble and that U-shaped set-up of keyboards in my studio. Yes, I can barely move in there (well, it is the big drum set's fault mostly) but I CAN do those Wakeman stretches.

    Another reason I do like and respect soft synths is that I have been able to add to my collection of hardware because of guys switching over.

    All is good.
    Nothing wrong with software, but I think this leaves something to be desired.

    I like their Synti A emulation better.

  20. #20
    Member hFx's Avatar
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    I've used several Mellotron emulations through the last few years and the one I tend to use mostly is the UVI Mellotron, which sound and interface I've come to prefer most. Maybe not the one which best emulates all the quirks of the original and also, it has quite limited sound sets. However it's the one that I felt instantly sounded very much like the M400 recordings I did during studio sessions long ago. The tape samples are commonplace but few seem to do the get the circuitry quite right. The Logic X Mellotron is quite OK. I tried the Arturia (got the previous collection) and I agree with Top Cat above, it's not what I'd go for...
    My Progressive Workshop at http://soundcloud.com/hfxx

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