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Thread: Help me understand Led Zeppelin?

  1. #226
    YouTube is flooded with Led Zep listening videos (reactions from kids and whatnot) but there are only a few listeners who go in knowing the music, who can break it down and illuminate its qualities from a musicological perspective:

  2. #227
    OK, so.

    While I don't care for the song itself very much I have to admit that the guitar solo in "Stairway to Heaven" is one of the real greats. So I went and watched/listened to ten live versions.

    Page apparently could not capture, live, the lightning he had caught in that bottle. In every single case the solos were (a) too damn long (except the O2 one); (b) boring; and (c) unmelodic noodling.

    Perhaps they just are not for me. I can live with that.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  3. #228
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    (Page's) solos were (a) too damn long... (b) boring; and (c) unmelodic noodling. (emphasis mine).
    That is my biggest problem with Page. Many times, his lack of restraint caused great songs like No Quarter to be ruined in concert. And I, too, was never a Led Zep aficionado. In recent years, I have grown "appreciative" of them, but mostly, they leave me flat and bored.
    Brian Dennehy: "I'm now 80 and I'm just another actor and that's fine with me. I've had a hell of a ride," ... "I have a nice house. I haven't got a palace, a mansion, but a pretty nice, comfortable home. I've raised a bunch of kids and sent them all to school, and they're all doing well. All the people that are close to me are reasonably healthy and happy. Listen, that's as much as anybody can hope for in life."

  4. #229
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    Page in concert was variable over time. There are times early on (late 60s through to 1973-ish) where I'm like, how the hell did he play that? But then later it's sometimes, how the hell did he play as badly as that?? Clams all over the shop.

    The version of 'No Quarter' on The Song Remains The Same was- for me- excellent. It was different to the studio version, but retained its spook factor. I'm less enamoured of the bloated 20-30 minute versions of later years, which just devolve into an unrelated blues jam in the middle. An excess crept into the live show, probably reaching its nadir on the 1977 tour. ISTR Plant also said that he felt they were showboating too much in that period. (Talking of which, a new, original source of Mike Millard's famous Listen To This Eddie tape recently emerged...sounded good to me!)

  5. #230
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    OK, so.

    While I don't care for the song itself very much I have to admit that the guitar solo in "Stairway to Heaven" is one of the real greats. So I went and watched/listened to ten live versions.

    Page apparently could not capture, live, the lightning he had caught in that bottle. In every single case the solos were (a) too damn long (except the O2 one); (b) boring; and (c) unmelodic noodling.

    Perhaps they just are not for me. I can live with that.
    You may find this interesting, then:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cOosnkWj2g
    David
    Happy with what I have to be happy with.

  6. #231
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Help you understand Led Zeppelin? Led Zeppelin is thin at one end, much much thicker in the middle, and then thin again at the far end.

  7. #232
    Member Koreabruce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    Help you understand Led Zeppelin? Led Zeppelin is thin at one end, much much thicker in the middle, and then thin again at the far end.
    And heavy. Very heavy.

  8. #233
    Quote Originally Posted by proggy_jazzer View Post
    You may find this interesting, then:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cOosnkWj2g
    Yeah, that's what prompted me to listen to so many versions of Zeppelin playing it. It was interesting but the only one I really dug was the Eric Johnson.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

  9. #234
    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    Help you understand Led Zeppelin? Led Zeppelin is thin at one end, much much thicker in the middle, and then thin again at the far end.
    seems quite similar to Anne Elk's theory on brontosauruses!

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q...tail&FORM=VIRE

  10. #235
    Member wideopenears's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vic2012 View Post
    Never enough love for Presence. I love that album. The whole album.
    Yeah, often my favorite, Sometimes HOTH....but often Presence.
    "And this is the chorus.....or perhaps it's a bridge...."

  11. #236
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    There was a thread over on Hoffman on "Tea for One" off of Presence. The old school view is that it was just a retread of "Since I've Been Loving You" but they point out the lyrical scope is entirely different, the guitar layering is far more extensive with rich harmonics, and the turnaround is totally different. I was playing it loudly on the big stereo a few times a week all summer and I was a little surprised that my spouse never complained.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  12. #237
    Member Guitarplyrjvb's Avatar
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    Regarding Zep studio vs. live, I think they sounded way, way better in the studio. Very sloppy live, especially late in their career when they were all wasted during the show. Zep remains the only band whose show I left in the middle of. It was painfully bad. I refer to their show at the Capital Center in Landover MD in 1977.

    Page was a wizard in the studio and the sound he got from his guitars and the band in general were utterly fantastic. This is all IMHO, of course.

  13. #238
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guitarplyrjvb View Post
    Regarding Zep studio vs. live, I think they sounded way, way better in the studio. Very sloppy live, especially late in their career when they were all wasted during the show. Zep remains the only band whose show I left in the middle of. It was painfully bad. I refer to their show at the Capital Center in Landover MD in 1977.

    Page was a wizard in the studio and the sound he got from his guitars and the band in general were utterly fantastic. This is all IMHO, of course.
    I was at the April 9, 1977 show at Chicago Stadium that was cut short by Jimmy Page's "intestinal flu". I've since watched most of the videos available from that time, and have to say that what limited show I saw, as flawed as it was, was still breathtaking. Plant and Page were electric, Bonham was earth-shaking, and JPJ was the glue that held the whole hot mess together. Admittedly, I was 15 and stoned out of my gourd, but it left an indelible impression and fueled my love for the band to this day.
    David
    Happy with what I have to be happy with.

  14. #239
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    For badgeholders only, Jimmy has a new long interview plugging his new book. Among other things, he talks about his early interest in avant-garde music and picking up the guitar again while in quarantine.

    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/m...pelin-1074825/
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  15. #240
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    Led Zeppelin is lesson #1 for anyone getting into rock music.
    my introduction into LZ was hanging out with my stoner neighbor-
    the soundtrack to The Song Remains The Same was the only album he had by them.
    of course i went to a High School where everyone loved them-
    if it weren't for LZ, i probably wouldn't have gotten into Rush.

  16. #241
    Interesting. Because of Zeppelin I didn't get into Rush till the '90s - my brother had one of their early records and tried to entice me by saying "They sound like Led Zeppelin", which of course turned me right off and I couldn't hear how good it was.
    Maka ki ecela tehani yanke lo!

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