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Thread: Rory Gallagher

  1. #51
    Jazzbo manqué Mister Triscuits's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    For what it's worth, when Fripp was interviewed in Guitar Player the first time, which I think was something like 72 or 73, he mentioned that he didn't use the wah wah more because the way the way wah wah is usually used he felt was "feeble" (I think that's the word he used), and then reiterated the argument about some guitarists using pedals to cover up unimaginative playing or whatever. (shrug)
    When John Wetton joined Family he had to cover the violin parts onstage that the previous bass players had played. He says he did a lot of "bluffing" with a wah-wah pedal to cover his lack of ability on the instrument.

  2. #52
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    No cover here.



    Clapton in Cream And Eric Brann in Iron Butterfly used it artisticly too.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Well, he was occasionally featured in music magazines. Maybe not Rolling Stone or Melody Maker, but I know Guitar Player and Guitar World ran articles on him occasionally.
    Well, I was thinking of the popular general UK music press and teen mags of the 70s, Record Mirror, NME, Fabulous 208, Teen Sounds and so on, not specialist magazines for musicians or specific instruments.

  4. #54
    re: wah-wah

    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post

    Clapton in Cream And Eric Brann in Iron Butterfly used it artisticly too.
    See also Frank Zappa, Michael Schenker, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Steve Vai (love the "conversation" he and Roth do on the intro of Yankee Rose, particularly the "laughing guitar"), Dave Brock (well, he does on Space Ritual), Wurzel and Phil Campbell on Motorhead's No Sleep At All, Brian Robertson on Thin Lizzy's Rosalie/The Cowgirl Song, and Jerry Garcia's circa 72-74 space jam freak outs.

    Oh yeah, and Pete Cosey on Miles Davis' Agharta and Pangaea.

  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    No cover here.



    Clapton in Cream And Eric Brann in Iron Butterfly used it artisticly too.
    I'm thinking Hendrix was more interested in taking the guitar beyond its normal constraints -- which he did with stunning regularity. And I would be highly amused to hear someone denigrate his use of the wah-wah in the late 60s. In fact, I would suggest he outdid everyone on the wah-wah as well.

    "And your little sister's immaculate virginity wings away on the bony shoulders of a young horse named George who stole surreptitiously into her geography revision."

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  6. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by The Dark Elf View Post
    I'm thinking Hendrix was more interested in taking the guitar beyond its normal constraints -- which he did with stunning regularity. And I would be highly amused to hear someone denigrate his use of the wah-wah in the late 60s. In fact, I would suggest he outdid everyone on the wah-wah as well.
    He has his share of detractors. Why? I have no effing idea. I always love the "over-rated" claim.

    Considering the guy was on the scene for four short years, has been gone for nearly 50 and is still influencing tons of players ...
    The White Zone is for loading and unloading only. If you got to load or unload go to the White Zone.

  7. #57
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Seen Rory 7 or 8 times, including a couple of times in Toronto back in the 70's then the rest in the 90's in Europe, including once a few months before he departed for greener pastures (we're talking April 95 or sduntin')


    Quote Originally Posted by Joe F. View Post
    Try his band Taste (all 3 albums)

    Solo Stuff
    s/t
    Deuce
    Top Priority
    Irish Tour
    TBH, his early solo albums is the only thing I've kept in the long run.

    I especially loved the debut (with Vincent crane guesting) and Deuce. I had lesser feelings for Blueprint, but loved the bluesy Tattoo.

    Both live albums of that era are excellent, but I'll prefer Irish Tour our Live in Europe.

    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    I like his mid 70's albums, e.g Irish Tour, Against The Grain, and Calling Card. The late 70's records like Photo Finish and Top Priority are pretty good too. Really, he's one of those guys you can't go wrong with, no matter what you get. Irish Tour is one of the all time great double live albums.
    I never really got into those hard rock era from Grain until Priority (despite those year being my "hard rock years").... But I did play the excellent Stage Struck, which more or less recapitulated that chapter.

    And oddly enough despite the release date, I kind of liked Jinx , as it was surprisingly good; but I dropped it all afterwards, but still made a point of catching his gigs in my area.

    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    Perhaps the two live albums Live In Europe and Irish Tour '74 are his most representative.
    That's my outlook, too, though I do still have the first two studio albums as his sound was really sweet

    I'm pleased that my local theatre will present the Irish Tour movie on the big screen (tonight is Leonard Cohen's Bird on A Wire)

    I have the DVD, but I crave for a big screen.


    ====================

    as for Taste, shame on me, but I could never get into the group, despite trying the debut, Isle Of Wight and Live 71.... but oddly enough, never On The Boards (I don't think I ever found it in the second-hand shops racks)

    This was too raw & rough for me, which is also rather odd as well, since that usually never stopped me.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  8. #58
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Dark Elf View Post
    I'm thinking Hendrix was more interested in taking the guitar beyond its normal constraints -- which he did with stunning regularity. And I would be highly amused to hear someone denigrate his use of the wah-wah in the late 60s. In fact, I would suggest he outdid everyone on the wah-wah as well.


    https://youtu.be/VQBTieAUumk?t=165

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Most likely apocryphal. Jimi also supposedly named Billy Gibbons, Phil Keaggy, and a number of other guitarists, depending on who's telling the anecdote. One of the guys from Chicago said that they were playing a show somewhere, and afterwards, he felt some tap on his shoulder and he turned around, and there was Jimi, who basically told him that Terry Kath was "better than me".
    Yes, possibly so but Rory is the one that's the most believable.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    One thing I loved about him was he didn't use any effect of any kind, plugging straight into the amp. Not only did he not use effects, he was opposed to their use. He felt it was a cop out to be soloing along, getting bored, then stepping on a Wah pedal and going "Wah-Wah-Wah-Wah........"
    Furthermore he could do wonders with just an acoustic guitar and his voice -



  11. #61
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    this would warrant a #metoo alert nowadays
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  12. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by progholio View Post
    Yes, possibly so but Rory is the one that's the most believable.
    Actually, Billy Gibbons would be the most believable. Jimi played some shows with Billy's pre-ZZ Top band, The Moving Sidewalks, circa 67 or 68, and there's photos of the two hanging out backstage. So Jimi actually spent some time with Billy, the two of them jamming together backstage, etc.

    I don't know if he ever hung out with Rory or not, though it seems likely that Taste were probably on the same bill as Jimi on more than one occasion. But then you could say the same thing about Chicago. So who knows who Jimi thought was the best guitarist, or whether he actually said "That guy's better than me".

  13. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Actually, Billy Gibbons would be the most believable. Jimi played some shows with Billy's pre-ZZ Top band, The Moving Sidewalks, circa 67 or 68, and there's photos of the two hanging out backstage. So Jimi actually spent some time with Billy, the two of them jamming together backstage, etc.

    I don't know if he ever hung out with Rory or not, though it seems likely that Taste were probably on the same bill as Jimi on more than one occasion. But then you could say the same thing about Chicago. So who knows who Jimi thought was the best guitarist, or whether he actually said "That guy's better than me".
    Jimi said the same thing about Randy California, who he also named, the story goes.

    The bottom line is that Jimi was a very humble person and respected them all, even if he was the best.
    The White Zone is for loading and unloading only. If you got to load or unload go to the White Zone.

  14. #64
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Dark Elf View Post
    I would suggest [Hendrix] outdid everyone on the wah-wah.
    Indeed. Like Joe "King" Oliver and Bubber Miley before him, Hendrix understood that the wah-wah is a surrogate for human speech; Jimi's speaking to us.
    Hell, they ain't even old-timey ! - Homer Stokes

  15. #65
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mogrooves View Post
    Indeed. Like Joe "King" Oliver and Bubber Miley before him, Hendrix understood that the wah-wah is a surrogate for human speech; Jimi's speaking to us.
    He could've renamed it the "blah-blah pedal" then
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  16. #66
    Member progholio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    He could've renamed it the "blah-blah pedal" then
    The master of the Blah Blah pedal at 1:46 -


  17. #67
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    I found this paragraph in the wiki article for Irish Tour. It gives some reasoning why Rory's studio work was so spotty.

    Gallagher never enjoyed going into the studio to make records. Playing to a live audience was essential, he thought, to get the real energy needed for the kind of music he wanted to play. The members of his band felt the same way. Speaking about the Irish tour album keyboardist Lou Martin said "Albums were always done in a rush because we were on the road so much, and then we’d come back to London and it could be two weeks – like Blueprint was done in two weeks – and that is ridiculous,... but Irish Tour was an absolute highlight,... the band came to fruition in the Calling Card days, by that time we were well seasoned … everybody knew everybody else’s style of playing... The studio was not the best environment for recording. He wasn’t at his most comfortable or happiest, I mean a lot of people really adapted to it really well like The Allman Brothers or Little Feat. With Rory, if he didn’t have somebody to look at then he couldn’t feed off the energy. That’s why Irish Tour is such a good bloody album because it was recorded live, he got the crowd there with him singing along and sort of like urging him along… without the presence of an audience the recording process for Rory was a bit of a strain"
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  18. #68
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Ok, I saw Irish Tour 74, the film last night at the local arts movie-house and it was packed (roughly 150 persons)

    I thought I'd bought the DVD, but from what I've seen last night, if I did buy it, I never viewed it. I'd have remembered on how semi-amateur §in a semi-good way) the production was. Even if I do own the DVD, it was a good idea to see this on a big screen (I was relegated to front row, because I got there at last minute )

    One thing that struck us (as a whole crowd) is that the tracks presented in the film are not the same versions than on the double album and are not played in the same order.
    FTM, many of the film versions are definitely not as good as the album are.

    double album:
    A1 Cradle Rock6:40
    A2 I Wonder Who7:36
    A3 Tattoo'd Lady4:53
    B1 Too Much Alcohol8:15
    B2 As the Crow Flies5:32
    B3 A Million Miles Away9:17
    C1 Walk on Hot Coals10:46
    C2 Who's That Comming9:30
    D1 Back on My Stompin' Ground (After Hours)5:21
    D2 Just a Little Bit8:01

    film
    1 Walk on Hot Coals
    2 Tattoo'd Lady
    3 Who's That Coming
    4 A Million Miles Away
    5 Going to My Home Town
    6 Cradle Rock
    7 As the Crow Flies
    8 Hands Off
    9 Bullfrog Blues




    Soooooooo, while I have a soft spot for Rory's first two solo albums, I really like the quartet line-up wioth Lou Martin on keys, because Rory had someone to answer to, though this was less evident in the Grain and Card albums
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  19. #69
    One of the greatest in a career full of peak performances- Rory with full band and horn section (including Dick Parry of Dark Side of The Moon fame)- already looking a little worse for wear but firing on all cylinders. Classic Chuck cover- if youve never seen it, get ready to rock! : )

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3aY3xboyEk

  20. #70
    Pardon me for posting back to back but this thread kicked off a long overdue personal Rory binge- Id forgotten this video fom Montreux where Rory pulls out all the stops and reveals how the battered strat got so battered- the bit where he looks at his watch and tells his squalling guitar to "come on" is priceless. Around the 8:35 mark it gets wild wild wild..what a showman...go Ted McKenna!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-AYHx9mMut8

  21. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by bfd View Post
    Pardon me for posting back to back but this thread kicked off a long overdue personal Rory binge- Id forgotten this video fom Montreux where Rory pulls out all the stops and reveals how the battered strat got so battered- the bit where he looks at his watch and tells his squalling guitar to "come on" is priceless. Around the 8:35 mark it gets wild wild wild..what a showman...go Ted McKenna!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-AYHx9mMut8
    The guy is rock'n'roll incarnated. He's absolutely total in every single note he plays. Thanks for sharing.

  22. #72
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bfd View Post
    Pardon me for posting back to back but this thread kicked off a long overdue personal Rory binge- Id forgotten this video fom Montreux where Rory pulls out all the stops and reveals how the battered strat got so battered- the bit where he looks at his watch and tells his squalling guitar to "come on" is priceless. Around the 8:35 mark it gets wild wild wild..what a showman...go Ted McKenna!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-AYHx9mMut8

    that was fuuuuuuunnnnnnn


    Thx

    One of my fave



    Winging it with Jack Bruce

    Last edited by Trane; 03-08-2019 at 10:32 AM.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    The guy is rock'n'roll incarnated. He's absolutely total in every single note he plays. Thanks for sharing.
    One of my favorite tunes from Rory , especially when played live where he and the band really stretch it out.
    I have the DVD from Montreux but haven't watched it in quite a while , time to revisit it.
    Last edited by bobert; 03-08-2019 at 12:28 PM.

  24. #74
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    For whomever is interested: there's a collection of vinyl reissues on Laser's Edge. All for a whopping $19 each.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

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