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Thread: Isildurs Bane and Peter Hammill team up for a new album

  1. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by thedunno View Post
    Somehow I expected that this collaboration between two of the torchbearers of adventurous prog would create a bit more buzz on this board.

    Anyway, I absolutely LOVE this album. It will certainly be in my top 5 or even top 3 of this year. Any other fans?
    A couple of tracks are really good. Overall a good record.

  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by polmico View Post
    ^But it will not be recorded, correct?
    It won't be recorded for official release, no.

  3. #78
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    Well, I only got In Amzonia recently, so I can't yet say anything definitive. But overall... I adore Isildurs Bane's work in the 20th century and Peter Hammill is one of my favourite lyricists, vocalists and songwriters (roughly in that order). The collaboration looked so good on the paper, that I was expecting them to utterly bollocks the whole thing up.

    Happily, they failed to do that. In Amazonia is a good album, though not exceptional. Hammill's lyrical and vocal approach is similar to his recent work, with the same concern for seizing the day and irreversibility of action. But into a larger context of a full band and extensive instrumental work, it just becomes more powerful. This is similar to the PH/PFM collaboration ”Sea of Memory”. Johansson's penchance for sonic experimentation and ”dirty” timbres heard on latter IB projects (and here extended to the vocals) works rather well here, and on tracks like ”Aguirre” and ”The Day Is Done” there is a some welcome lyricism of the kind that I liked in their pre-millenium works. The combination of that and the kind of electro-acoustic chamber sound that he continued to explore here was what made the likes of Mind Vol. 1 so great to my ears.

    Perhaps because of its brevity, the album doesn't quite seem to have the gravity that I'd expect – when you think it's about to hit its stride, it stops. I can't say anything about longevity yet, but it is more memorable than Under the Radar and makes for a good complement to Hammill's own From the Trees (which I thought was among his stronger works in the recent years). Certainly it's a more adventurous counterpart to Colours Not Found in Nature.

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