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Thread: Woodstock 2019, the return at 50

  1. #51
    Geriatric Anomaly progeezer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by popeyebonaparte View Post
    The only two decent bands to play at the original Woodstock were CSN, The Who and Ten Years After.
    Is this some form of new math?
    "My choice early in life was either to be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politician, and to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference"

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  2. #52
    Member Top Cat's Avatar
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    This is a waste of time because you CANNOT capture what happened at Woodstock again. It was pure magic, a convergence of cosmic and human forces that can't be duplicated.
    I doubt those of us who lived during that time period will ever witness anything like that again in our lifetime. And I'm not just referring to the event Woodstock but the changes that were occurring both socially and culturally were truly remarkable.

    And the magic bubble burst at the Rolling Stones Altamont concert and the beginning of the end when innocence and trust died.
    Who in the hell in their right mind would hire the Hell's Angels to run security for the event...
    Soundcloud page: Open Window, musical meanderings https://soundcloud.com/precipice
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  3. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by progeezer View Post
    Is this some form of new math?
    I would say it's clearly some form of new troll

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    I would say it's clearly some form of new troll
    Sha-na-na were the only eight great ones at that original intestinal-festival.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  5. #55
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    Everything (singles/albums) from 1965-1970.
    Ok thanks. I was curious what your fav was/is. I'm with Scrote with Who's Next being my fav but there is definitely a character that is so unique with the 60s version of this band.

  6. #56
    Geriatric Anomaly progeezer's Avatar
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    The Who have always been one of my 3 favorite bands, along w/Steely Dan & Love (those 3 have not changed since about 1973). I have different choices for my favorite Who album & imo the overall best album they ever made musically.

    My favorite: tie between Sell Out & Who's Next on any given day
    Best musically: Quadrophenia
    "My choice early in life was either to be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politician, and to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference"

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  7. #57
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Ok thanks. I was curious what your fav was/is. I'm with Scrote with Who's Next being my fav but there is definitely a character that is so unique with the 60s version of this band.
    If you make me pick ONE fave, it’s Sell Out.
    Steve F.

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    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "The older I get, the more I realize that cynicism is just realism spelled wrong."

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  8. #58
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    If you make me pick ONE fave, it’s Sell Out.
    I definitely need to check it out again. I recall it being more English, quirky, whimsical, etc than anything else they did...almost Canterburian in nature at times. Am I close? Always loved I can see for Miles....

  9. #59
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    English and quirky? Yes.
    Whimsical? Debatable, but some of it (Thinking of Tattoo and Maryanne) certainly.
    Canteburian? Not within a million miles, imo.
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
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    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "The older I get, the more I realize that cynicism is just realism spelled wrong."

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  10. #60
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    English and quirky? Yes.
    Whimsical? Debatable, but some of it (Thinking of Tattoo and Maryanne) certainly.
    Canteburian? Not within a million miles, imo.
    2 out of 3...not bad

    I'll give a re-spinach.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    This is a waste of time because you CANNOT capture what happened at Woodstock again. It was pure magic, a convergence of cosmic and human forces that can't be duplicated.
    I doubt those of us who lived during that time period will ever witness anything like that again in our lifetime. And I'm not just referring to the event Woodstock but the changes that were occurring both socially and culturally were truly remarkable.

    And the magic bubble burst at the Rolling Stones Altamont concert and the beginning of the end when innocence and trust died.
    Who in the hell in their right mind would hire the Hell's Angels to run security for the event...
    The Who agrees that only The Who in Hell would do it again😉
    ď[They] agreed that it was neither possible nor necessary to educate people who never questioned anything.Ē

  12. #62
    I have a friend who volunteers at the Bethel Woods Museum, which is on the site of the original Woodstock. They are planning their own festival there, unrelated to Michael Lang’s. There is an amphitheater there, no guests announced yet, but hoping it will be a more nostalgic version to what Lang is planning.

  13. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    2 out of 3...not bad
    .
    Gottverdammter! No paraphrasing Jim Steinman lyrics!!!!

    OK, so maybe it's not that funny, but it's the best I could do on short notice!

  14. #64
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndiSexgang View Post
    Wow! I don't why I'm surprised but I am, that so many of you still listen to so much of this stuff.

    As for live, I saw Canned Heat at Sweden Rock Festival in 2014. Not my cup of tea at all.
    Canned has always been known for it's excellent stage presence ... Whether it's your dope or not is something different.

    As for listening to Woodstock generation, it seems obvious that if you still listen to Yes and Genesis or Crimson, you're going to listen to most of what played at those times.

    Quote Originally Posted by popeyebonaparte View Post
    The only two decent bands to play at the original Woodstock were CSN, The Who and Ten Years After.
    which one of the three listed is not a band??

    Quote Originally Posted by timmy View Post
    I hope I am very wrong but I have a bad feeling about this event. There will most likely be political groups using it as a platform, or indoctrination camp, or proving ground, where violence will have many opportunities to occur. For some reason, I get the feeling this is going to be more of an Altamont than a Woodstock. (meaning: tragedy) I truly hope that I am wrong.
    You know, Woodstock was extremely political.

    I do hope you're wrong about your feeling, though.

    Quote Originally Posted by pinkpanther View Post
    I have a friend who volunteers at the Bethel Woods Museum, which is on the site of the original Woodstock. They are planning their own festival there, unrelated to Michael Langís. There is an amphitheater there, no guests announced yet, but hoping it will be a more nostalgic version to what Lang is planning.
    Hence the confusion about the two sites I mentioned in the OP, then??
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  15. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    English and quirky? Yes.
    Whimsical? Debatable, but some of it (Thinking of Tattoo and Maryanne) certainly.
    Canteburian? Not within a million miles, imo.
    All correct.

    There is something though in the post-modern flow of disparate songs, mixed with the commercials, that is not that far away - at least in intentions - of what Soft Machine did in those first 2 records. It's pop and it's artsy. Still in the musical content no close at all.

  16. #66
    ^ True, but still the Moon style of playing and the bohemian/anarchic madcap/mod-mentality and antic was an influence on early Softs - although probably not in a direct musical manner.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  17. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by AndiSexgang View Post
    Wow! I don't why I'm surprised but I am, that so many of you still listen to so much of this stuff.
    I am also shocked that people who like rock music listen to mediocrities like - to name just 2 - Jimmy Hendrix, Jefferson Airplane, Santana, CCR, CNS, the Who, the Dead, Incredible String Band etc etc I thought this was a serious forum.

  18. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    If you make me pick ONE fave, itís Sell Out.
    Me too.
    The Who, apart from the famous tunes, were a band I didnít really connect with until my early thirties. Sell Out was when the coin properly dropped. I think its a magnificent album.

    Funnily enough, while always quite liking them, (Roth era) Van Halen and Judas Priest didnít fully Ďgetí me until I was a so-called grown up too.
    Long after Iíd had my Messiaen/ Zorn/ Vander/ Sun Ra etc epiphanies!

  19. #69
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    I am also shocked that people who like rock music listen to mediocrities like - to name just 2 - Jimmy Hendrix, Jefferson Airplane, Santana, CCR, CNS, the Who, the Dead, Incredible String Band etc etc
    I thought this was a serious forum.
    Yup, PE members who do that should be beaten to a pulp, pissed upon and the expelled with tar & feather.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  20. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by Kavus Torabi View Post
    The Who, apart from the famous tunes, were a band I didnít really connect with until my early thirties.
    I have a theory that the people who got late into the Who were seriously corrupted by Led Zeppelin mania during an early age. I know that has been my case. The Led Zep were the real heavy thing, whereas the Who just worthy precursors.

    Of course I've seen the light now...

  21. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    Yup, PE members who do that should be beaten to a pulp, pissed upon and the expelled with tar & feather.
    Yeah, some radical solutions at last!

  22. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    I have a theory that the people who got late into the Who were seriously corrupted by Led Zeppelin mania during an early age. I know that has been my case. The Led Zep were the real heavy thing, whereas the Who just worthy precursors.

    Of course I've seen the light now...
    Well, I still like Led Zep but I think that theory holds up.

  23. #73
    ^ Being 12 and a huge fan of 70s hard rock (Purple, Heep, Free, Sabbath) only to have to advance to LZ, who were eventually sometimes heavier than either. But then again to discover The Who through the Woodstock triple soundtrack (for real!); here was a band who were never considered part of that "wave", but whose Live at Leeds was wilder, rawer and more violent than anything I'd heard by Deep Sab, while Tommy and Next were at least as eclectic as LZ or Free.

    At 14-15 I remember finding the "See Me, Feel Me" section (on the Woodstock triple) some of the most menacing rock I'd ever encountered, constantly getting more invading and threatening as that chorus was repeated. Orgasmic!

    I had a similar reaction on discovering King Crimson's '73/74-albums later on; they were never a "heavy rock" group, yet they were heavier than anything I'd come across. That nearly blew me. Two years down the line and I discovered Henry Cow; rarely considered "prog rock", they were still more progressive than any which were.

    I liked all that.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  24. #74
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kavus Torabi View Post
    Me too.
    The Who, apart from the famous tunes, were a band I didn’t really connect with until my early thirties. Sell Out was when the coin properly dropped. I think its a magnificent album.

    Funnily enough, while always quite liking them, (Roth era) Van Halen and Judas Priest didn’t fully ‘get’ me until I was a so-called grown up too.
    Long after I’d had my Messiaen/ Zorn/ Vander/ Sun Ra etc epiphanies!
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    ^ Being 12 and a huge fan of 70s hard rock (Purple, Heep, Free, Sabbath) only to have to advance to LZ, who were eventually sometimes heavier than either. But then again to discover The Who through the Woodstock triple soundtrack (for real!); here was a band who were never considered part of that "wave", but whose Live at Leeds was wilder, rawer and more violent than anything I'd heard by Deep Sab, while Tommy and Next were at least as eclectic as LZ or Free.

    At 14-15 I remember finding the "See Me, Feel Me" section (on the Woodstock triple) some of the most menacing rock I'd ever encountered, constantly getting more invading and threatening as that chorus was repeated. Orgasmic!

    I had a similar reaction on discovering King Crimson's '73/74-albums later on; they were never a "heavy rock" group, yet they were heavier than anything I'd come across. That nearly blew me. Two years down the line and I discovered Henry Cow; rarely considered "prog rock", they were still more progressive than any which were.

    I liked all that.
    Yo, fellers!

    Let's get together, drink some beer and play a bunch of rock bands that we aren't 'famous' for being into!

    it's a DATE!
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "The older I get, the more I realize that cynicism is just realism spelled wrong."

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  25. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post

    At 14-15 I remember finding the "See Me, Feel Me" section (on the Woodstock triple) some of the most menacing rock I'd ever encountered, constantly getting more invading and threatening as that chorus was repeated. Orgasmic!
    That is a clear example of an uncontainable force, an anthemic melody of the highest order rendered with complete abandon by the band in the most savage, ritualistic of ways. It definitely mirrors what was taking place below and around at this specific slice of timespace. Which one can only imagine or suspect, if one wasn't present.

    I love Led Zep and always will, but while they kept the same "blow the roof" level of energy, they were already announcing the times to come. Times of entairtenment and selfishness rather than spirituality and collectivity. That's a rough sketch of course, but it does tell some of the story.

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