Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 183

Thread: Woodstock 2019, the return at 50

  1. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by AndiSexgang View Post
    Of the bands that played in 69, how many have you listened to, A) regularly in the past? And B) still listen to kind of regularly today?
    .
    Hendrix, The Who, Jefferson Airplane, Sly And The Family Stone, Richie Havens, the Grateful Dead, and Santana, off the top of my head.

  2. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    I'm surprised they're trying it again after the fiasco Woodstock '99 turned out to be...riots, fires, et cetera, et cetera
    They're not inviting Fred Wassisname, the guy who refused to ask the audience to calm during his lame band's set, and who then did a bit of crowd surfing on a piece of the security wall.

  3. #28
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brussels
    Posts
    3,062
    Quote Originally Posted by AndiSexgang View Post
    Of the bands that played in 69, how many have you listened to, A) regularly in the past? And B) still listen to kind of regularly today?
    A)
    Hendrix
    Santana
    Johnny Winter
    Jeff Airplane
    The Who
    CCR
    Dead & Janis
    TYA
    Sly
    Mountain

    B)
    Most of them, I steal either listen or don't zap away when it comes on airplay, but those 4 especially:
    Hendrix
    Santana

    Johnny Winter
    Jeff Airplane
    The Who

    CCR
    Dead
    TYA
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  4. #29
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    3,137
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    Listen to very regularly today:
    The Who
    What Who albums do you listen to the most these days?

  5. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by AndiSexgang View Post
    Of the bands that played in 69, how many have you listened to, A) regularly in the past? And B) still listen to kind of regularly today?

    A)

    B)
    Airplane, CJ & the Fish, Grateful Dead, Santana, The Who, J. Sebastian (and the Lovin S.), Tim Hardin, Melanie, The Incredible String Band, CCR, Sly, The Band, CSN&Y, Butterfield, Hendrix.

    Today I'm long since fed up with some of these, but that's also the case with many a "prog" band of the 70s that I discovered coming off the heel of 60s rock. And pretty much of the latter has surprisingly proven far more enduring than stagnant rock/pop of following decades. Of course, being adolescent in the 80s and basically being exposed to past musics as a gesture of purely "retro" antics, meant that none of these acts were ever my contemporaries. Somehow Twisted Sister, Modern Talking, Yngwie, Thompson Twins or Bruce S. never really got under my skin that deeply. Always wondered why.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  6. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by AndiSexgang View Post
    Of the bands that played in 69, how many have you listened to, A) regularly in the past? And B) still listen to kind of regularly today?
    Listened to and still listen to

    Woodstock 69:
    Santana
    Grateful Dead
    Credence Clearwater Revival

    Janis Joplin
    Sly and the Family Stone
    The Who
    Jefferson Airplane
    Joe Cocker
    The Band
    Johnny Winter
    Crosby Stills Nash and Young
    Paul Butterfield
    Jimi Hendrix


    Woodstock 94: Listened to and still listen to.
    Blues Traveler
    Kings X

    Sheryl Crow
    3
    The Orb
    Orbital
    Joe Cocker
    Cypress Hill
    Rollins Band
    Crosby Stills and Nash
    Nine Inch Nails
    Metallica
    Aerosmith
    The Band
    Primus
    The Allman Brothers Band
    Traffic

    Bob Dylan
    Red Hot Chili Peppers
    Peter Gabriel
    Paul Rodgers
    Santana


    Wooodstock 99:
    The String Cheese Incident
    moe
    Sheryl Crow
    Bruce Hornsby
    Metallica

    3
    Red Hot Chili Peppers
    Last edited by Wah3; 01-19-2019 at 07:40 PM.

  7. #32
    I've said this elsewhere, but Woodstock was a one-time event that captured a particular era, both historically and musically. You can't replicate something like that. It's like a bad movie sequel.
    "And your little sister's immaculate virginity wings away on the bony shoulders of a young horse named George who stole surreptitiously into her geography revision."

    Occasional musical musings on https://darkelffile.blogspot.com/

  8. #33
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Fluffy Cloud
    Posts
    2,706
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    What Who albums do you listen to the most these days?
    Everything (singles/albums) from 1965-1970.
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "The older I get, the more I realize that cynicism is just realism spelled wrong."

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  9. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    Everything (singles/albums) from 1965-1970.
    All excellent, but I have to say that IMO Who's Next arbuably remains one of the greatest r&r albums of all time - and that's '71. Nowadays I get more mileage out of that than I do from most anything by Stones or LZ or even many a FabFour record. There's just something essentially sad, deeply intelligent and historically telling about a tune like "Song Is Over" - like an entire intimate novel within that simple imagery of words.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  10. #35
    Member Koreabruce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Chuncheon, South Korea
    Posts
    670
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    All excellent, but I have to say that IMO Who's Next arbuably remains one of the greatest r&r albums of all time - and that's '71. Nowadays I get more mileage out of that than I do from most anything by Stones or LZ or even many a FabFour record. There's just something essentially sad, deeply intelligent and historically telling about a tune like "Song Is Over" - like an entire intimate novel within that simple imagery of words.
    Yes, I wholeheartedly agree! Who's Next will always be my favorite Who album, and "Song Is Over" is hands down my favorite Who song.

  11. #36
    I still listen to Creedence, Santana, Who, Mountain, Hendrix and Jefferson Airplane. In fact I just googled Melanie just last week and listened to a few of her tunes. I think about he only decade that I mostly ignore is the 1990's - but not all. I got into bands with horns in that decade, because most of the music was... Well, not for me. Kind of like today.
    I got nothin'

    ...avoiding any implication that I have ever entertained a cognizant thought.

  12. #37
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Fluffy Cloud
    Posts
    2,706
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    All excellent, but I have to say that IMO Who's Next arbuably remains one of the greatest r&r albums of all time - and that's '71. Nowadays I get more mileage out of that than I do from most anything by Stones or LZ or even many a FabFour record. There's just something essentially sad, deeply intelligent and historically telling about a tune like "Song Is Over" - like an entire intimate novel within that simple imagery of words.
    Who’s Next is great but it’s past the period of the band that I really just ENJOY (not appreciate, not admire, but ENJOY the most).

    I dig them most as loud louts! YMMV.

    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "The older I get, the more I realize that cynicism is just realism spelled wrong."

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  13. #38
    ^^^^^^

    I wonder if Daltrey still hopes he dies before he gets old. My dad used to get so pissed when I played that song... "Yeah, lets see how the idiot feels about that in 20 years..."


    I haven't heard if he's ever addressed that little bit of shortsightedness (if it is indeed shortsighted).
    I got nothin'

    ...avoiding any implication that I have ever entertained a cognizant thought.

  14. #39
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Fluffy Cloud
    Posts
    2,706
    ^^^^^^

    Daltrey was just the singer; it’s Pete’s words.
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "The older I get, the more I realize that cynicism is just realism spelled wrong."

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  15. #40
    ^ Additionally there's that tiny argument of "rhetorical speech" - or, as it often is, getting "in character".

    Although Townshend most definitely was trying to express a general point alive with many a youngster of the post-war generation.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  16. #41
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brussels
    Posts
    3,062
    OK, I'll play for the other festivals



    Woodstock 94: Listened to and still listen to.
    Blues Traveler (first album, mainly/only >> spinned it two weeks ago)
    Aerosmith (70's albums mainly)
    The Allman Brothers Band
    Traffic (70's albums mainly)
    Red Hot Chili Peppers (90's albums mainly)
    Peter Gabriel
    Santana

    Wooodstock 99:
    Red Hot Chili Peppers (90's albums mainly)



    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    All excellent, but I have to say that IMO Who's Next arbuably remains one of the greatest r&r albums of all time - and that's '71. Nowadays I get more mileage out of that than I do from most anything by Stones or LZ or even many a FabFour record. There's just something essentially sad, deeply intelligent and historically telling about a tune like "Song Is Over" - like an entire intimate novel within that simple imagery of words.
    Who's Next (including the bonus tracks from Lifehouse), Quadrophenia and Who Are You

    ===================

    what strikes me that the line-up of the 94 edition was only one stage, when most of the Eurpean big festivals already had either two (or sometimes three) stages at the time.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  17. #42
    Live at Leeds is a monster.

    I have a very soft spot for the Who Sell Out. Criminally underrated.

    Tommy, Who's Next, Quadrophenia is a trilogy that none can beat. To me they were the greatest rock'n'roll band of all time.

  18. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    Live at Leeds is a monster.

    I have a very soft spot for the Who Sell Out. Criminally underrated.
    I Just had The Who Sell Out on the other day. Great album, indeed!

  19. #44
    I was a big fan of the film , saw it a zillion times and I had all the time the triple vinyl with me and forced it on everybody to listen to . I knew even the announcements by heart. I saw in 79 in Germany a 10 ten year revival big indoor festival with from memory Arlo Guthrie , Richie Havens among others, a total rip off . Nowadays I feel kind of strange to have cheeply run after every big concert and festival in the 70s to see and hear music in bad condition. A lot of my hearing problems come from this time. From memory Michael Wadleigh had already sold the rights to WB before the festival even started. This was so completely We're only in it for the money. I still listen to most of the bands/ musicians especially Hendrix CSN&Y , Jefferson Airplane, Grateful Dead
    Dieter Moebius : "Art people like things they don’t understand!"

  20. #45
    LinkMan Chain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Townsville, Australia
    Posts
    116
    “Pleasure and pain can be experienced simultaneously,” she said, gently massaging my back as we listened to her Coldplay CD.

  21. #46
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    142
    Wow! I don't why I'm surprised but I am, that so many of you still listen to so much of this stuff.

    As for live, I saw Canned Heat at Sweden Rock Festival in 2014. Not my cup of tea at all.

  22. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by AndiSexgang View Post
    Wow! I don't why I'm surprised but I am, that so many of you still listen to so much of this stuff.

    As for live, I saw Canned Heat at Sweden Rock Festival in 2014. Not my cup of tea at all.
    I just played a Canned Heat album this weekend... Don't know how they have aged but in their time they were fine by my ears..

  23. #48
    The only two decent bands to play at the original Woodstock were CSN, The Who and Ten Years After.

  24. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by popeyebonaparte View Post
    The only two decent bands to play at the original Woodstock were CSN, The Who and Ten Years After.
    In your opinion, which is in the minority.
    The White Zone is for loading and unloading only. If you got to load or unload go to the White Zone.

  25. #50
    (aka timmybass69) timmy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    central Texas
    Posts
    124
    I hope I am very wrong but I have a bad feeling about this event. There will most likely be political groups using it as a platform, or indoctrination camp, or proving ground, where violence will have many opportunities to occur. For some reason, I get the feeling this is going to be more of an Altamont than a Woodstock. (meaning: tragedy) I truly hope that I am wrong.
    "Why is it when these great Prog guys get together, they always want to make a Journey album?"
    - fiberman, 7/5/2015

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •