Thread: Movies - Take Two. Action!

  1. #4901
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    Watched Seth Mcfarlane's Ted. Opening with the Bear smoking a bong. That sets the tone for really enjoyble comedy.
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  2. #4902
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    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    Watched Seth Mcfarlane's Ted. Opening with the Bear smoking a bong. That sets the tone for really enjoyble comedy.
    I thought Ted was pretty good. It didn't blow me away, but agree it was enjoyable.

  3. #4903
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    Anyone seen Irresistible yet? We'd really like to, but are unwilling to plump for $19.99 to watch a movie at home.
    David
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  4. #4904
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    Is that a pay-per-view fee, or the cost of the dvd? Until now, I hadn't heard of Irresistible.
    if you want money for people with minds that hate, all I can tell you is brother you have to wait

  5. #4905
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    The way I understand it, the movie is seeing only limited release in theatres, most likely because of the coronavirus, and is at the same time being offered as a VOD, at the $19.99 price point. I think it's for a single viewing, but I'm not sure.
    David
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  6. #4906
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    Thanks. I know very few films are being released while the virus has the movie theaters closed (they're closed here). When something does come out, I just have to guess the format and venue. $20 does seem steep to see a movie one time, anywhere.
    if you want money for people with minds that hate, all I can tell you is brother you have to wait

  7. #4907
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Typically they are $20 when they first appear on my streaming services but drop to atound $5 a few weeks after that. I usually wait for the $5.
    Ian

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  8. #4908
    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    Watched Seth Mcfarlane's Ted. Opening with the Bear smoking a bong. That sets the tone for really enjoyble comedy.
    I still need to see that. I hear they spend a lot of time riffing on Flash Gordon.

  9. #4909
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    One of the theater chains is set to reopen in July. Sounds crazy to me.

  10. #4910
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    Mother (2009 Korea), written and directed by Bong Joon Ho (Parasite). A boy considered a "retard" in his town is accused of a girl's murder. His doting mother must try to prove him innocent.
    if you want money for people with minds that hate, all I can tell you is brother you have to wait

  11. #4911
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    For those of you with HBO, three movies I've been wanting to see have just been added: Ad Astra, Doctor Sleep, and Ford vs Ferrari.
    I never drink water. Fish fuck in it. - W. C. Fields

  12. #4912
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    For those of you with HBO, three movies I've been wanting to see have just been added: Ad Astra, Doctor Sleep, and Ford vs Ferrari.
    Ford vs Ferrari is very good, nice performances all round. Ad Astra is very very slow with very little happening at all. Brad Pitt does stoic the entire movie.
    Ian

    Gordon Haskell - "You've got to keep the groove in your head and play a load of bollocks instead"
    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  13. #4913
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    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    Ford vs Ferrari is very good, nice performances all round. Ad Astra is very very slow with very little happening at all. Brad Pitt does stoic the entire movie.
    Agree Ford V Ferrari is great. I saw it in a theater, so not sure how well it will transfer to the small screen, but I totally dug it.

  14. #4914
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    I still need to see that. I hear they spend a lot of time riffing on Flash Gordon.
    I thought DC did The Crisis to set everything straight but alas, my crows tell me they are making a Flash movie that doesn't tie into the mythology of the Arrowverse they have set up in all their shows. I guess they just can't get it right but I don't care, it's all stupid to me but for some reason, I watch it. Even the new nonsense Stargirl. Damn that Legends show. I never intended to watch comic books.
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  15. #4915
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    For those of you with HBO, three movies I've been wanting to see have just been added: Ad Astra, Doctor Sleep, and Ford vs Ferrari.
    Thanks. Want to see Dr. Sleep and the others, well, lets see what happens. I'm so not a car guy but I do think I'll enjoy FvF.
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  16. #4916
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    I watched Doctor Sleep Friday night. It was good, with a lot of references to Kubrick's The Shining. Unlike the latter, tho, Doctor Sleep lacked any atmosphere; absolutely no sense of dread prevalent in Kubrick's masterpiece. And even tho I liked the story, for the most part, the movie just felt tepid. Grade: B.

    As a big racing fan (and amateur racing historian), I was a little ambivalent about Ford vs Ferrari since I tend to dislike movies about racing, be they biopics or fiction (the exception is Le Mans, starring Steve McQueen). It's why I still haven't seen Rush, directed by Ron Howard who I generally think makes good movies. The reason is because to the average viewer racing usually isn't exciting and directors feel a need to make racing scenes exciting while ignoring reality. And I saw some of that in FvF. And right off the bat, it felt like a biopic I wasn't going to like. In spite of myself, I still enjoyed it. Grade: B+.
    I never drink water. Fish fuck in it. - W. C. Fields

  17. #4917
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    The Shining--a re-watch b/c it's hot in Texas and I wanted to be in the Overlook hotel in the winter. TV

    Aguirre, Wrath of God--I saw a bit of it with subtitles, but later watched the dubbed version. I preferred the dub b/c I could also concentrated on the cinematography. Conquistadors looking for El Dorado. Popol Vuh soundtrack sets the stage. Roku, PLuto

    A Clockwork Orange--one of the best scenes for me was when Alex was in the hospital recuperating and the therapist comes in asking him to complete these psychological drawings.

    Diamonds in the Night 1964 is a Czech film about two young men escaping from somewhere (we don't know in the beginning) but shots are being shot at them. We later find out they are escaping a train that was to take them to a concentration camp. Once we understand that, their actions make a lot more sense. It's told in an elusive way so there are a lot of things one has to put together to figure out the story. It's also told in a non-linear way and with a few fantasies thrown in for good measure. There's also some ants shown as symbolism, and I'm not sure what the meaning to that might be: groups? a random universe? freedom? But for me that's one of the interesting aspects of the film--you have to fill in a few holes. It's a short film a little over an hour, but done pretty well. It was on YT, but I don't know if it still is.

    Rebecca an early Alfred Hitchcock film, sort of a melodrama and mystery at the same time. Nice costumes and atmosphere too. Joan Fontaine plays the second wife, to a wealthy recent widowed (Maxim) that suffers depression at the passing of his first wife. They have a whirlwind romance, but all does not turn into a fantasy romance novel for Fontaine's character. There's a shadow of mystery about the former wife, and her new husband is distant, cold, and has fits of anger. The household is also something of an obstacle. All in all though a pretty good melodrama adaptation from a book. It was on YT.

    Eraserhead--David Lynch, experimental, midnight movie, Eraserhead in probably thirty years. It's just as surreal and bizarre now as it ever was. It's an art film about a guy, his wife, and their malformed child in an alienating, oppressive environment--or something like that. It's better to experience it yourself. It had been on YT.

    Speak--is easy to write off as one of those teen angst movies, which is not typically something I care to watch, however, Speak is a cut above most of them. About a teen who appears to be rejected from most of the cliques and students in that school, but is dealing with past trauma that happened to her as she goes about her daily life. It's somewhat an understated film, and recommended. On YT.

  18. #4918
    [QUOTE=hippypants;985419]
    Aguirre, Wrath of God--I saw a bit of it with subtitles, but later watched the dubbed version. I preferred the dub b/c I could also concentrated on the cinematography. Conquistadors looking for El Dorado. Popol Vuh soundtrack sets the stage. Roku, PLuto
    The Popol Vuh music was, I thought, the best part of the movie. TCM ran a bunch of Herzog movies a couple years ago, and I DVR'd as many of them as I could. I ended up watching that one, Fitzcarraldo, and Stroszek. I also saw the short film Werner Herzog Eats His Shoe. I think Stroszek was the one I liked best, though I'm not sure I'd really want to sit through any of the a second time.

    A Clockwork Orange--one of the best scenes for me was when Alex was in the hospital recuperating and the therapist comes in asking him to complete these psychological drawings.
    My favorite scene, or scenes, is all the stuff near the end, after his former droogs (now policemen) beat him senseless, and he ends up at the house where they had attacked the elderly couple several years earlier. Why do I like that part of the movie? (Oh, c'mon, you have to have seen this coming) Because the old man's manservant is played by David Prowse.

    You may not recognize that name, but David Prowse career has several highlights that interest me. He was in two of the Hammer House Frankenstein pictures, he was in a Tomorrow People serial, he was in an episode of Space: 1999, and he played Hotblack Desiato's bodyguard in the TV version of The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy.

    But there's one particular role that David Prowse is most famous for. He played an antagonist in three movies (one of which also had Peter Cushing, with whom he worked in the late 70's and early 80's. They dubbed some American guy's voice over, but that's Prowse you see on screen with his face hidden (though they used another actor in the third movie when he finally takes his mask off and you see his character's face for the very first time). And reportedly, he once made a "good guess" as to his character's true identity, about a year after the first movie came out, but before the screenplay had been written for the second one.


    But damn, if only I could remember what those three movies were called...

  19. #4919
    Quote Originally Posted by hippypants View Post

    Eraserhead--David Lynch, experimental, midnight movie, Eraserhead in probably thirty years. It's just as surreal and bizarre now as it ever was. It's an art film about a guy, his wife, and their malformed child in an alienating, oppressive environment--or something like that. It's better to experience it yourself. It had been on YT.
    Thirty years old?! You're off by about 13 years. The movie came out in 1977 (and Lynch spent the preceding 7 years working on it).

  20. #4920
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    I watched Doctor Sleep Friday night. It was good, with a lot of references to Kubrick's The Shining. Unlike the latter, tho, Doctor Sleep lacked any atmosphere; absolutely no sense of dread prevalent in Kubrick's masterpiece. And even tho I liked the story, for the most part, the movie just felt tepid. Grade: B.

    As a big racing fan (and amateur racing historian), I was a little ambivalent about Ford vs Ferrari since I tend to dislike movies about racing, be they biopics or fiction (the exception is Le Mans, starring Steve McQueen). It's why I still haven't seen Rush, directed by Ron Howard who I generally think makes good movies. The reason is because to the average viewer racing usually isn't exciting and directors feel a need to make racing scenes exciting while ignoring reality. And I saw some of that in FvF. And right off the bat, it felt like a biopic I wasn't going to like. In spite of myself, I still enjoyed it. Grade: B+.
    I agree on both counts. Dr Sleep just seemed determined to shoehorn in as many callbacks and references to the original as possible, but the story and characters just did not engage me. I hate this sort of filmmaking, its as though they throw in the references so they can tease people into the theatres with the trailers. Dont really matter if people don't like it, they have got their money.

    I really enjoyed Ford vs Ferrari though. A good story well told, good performances and great driving scenes.
    I only clicked on it because I thought it was going to be something more interesting...

  21. #4921
    [QUOTE=GuitarGeek;985428]
    Quote Originally Posted by hippypants View Post


    The Popol Vuh music was, I thought, the best part of the movie. TCM ran a bunch of Herzog movies a couple years ago, and I DVR'd as many of them as I could. I ended up watching that one, Fitzcarraldo, and Stroszek. I also saw the short film Werner Herzog Eats His Shoe. I think Stroszek was the one I liked best, though I'm not sure I'd really want to sit through any of the a second time.



    My favorite scene, or scenes, is all the stuff near the end, after his former droogs (now policemen) beat him senseless, and he ends up at the house where they had attacked the elderly couple several years earlier. Why do I like that part of the movie? (Oh, c'mon, you have to have seen this coming) Because the old man's manservant is played by David Prowse.

    You may not recognize that name, but David Prowse career has several highlights that interest me. He was in two of the Hammer House Frankenstein pictures, he was in a Tomorrow People serial, he was in an episode of Space: 1999, and he played Hotblack Desiato's bodyguard in the TV version of The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy.

    But there's one particular role that David Prowse is most famous for. He played an antagonist in three movies (one of which also had Peter Cushing, with whom he worked in the late 70's and early 80's. They dubbed some American guy's voice over, but that's Prowse you see on screen with his face hidden (though they used another actor in the third movie when he finally takes his mask off and you see his character's face for the very first time). And reportedly, he once made a "good guess" as to his character's true identity, about a year after the first movie came out, but before the screenplay had been written for the second one.


    But damn, if only I could remember what those three movies were called...
    I watched a fascinating documentary on Prowse called I Am Your Father.

    Its a shame his tenure with the SW movies was blighted by the fact that he fell out of favor with Lucas because he is believed to have leaked scripts to the press, although I don't believe it was ever proven.

    Prowse was never going to have his voice used for Darth Vader, because apart from not being an actor per se (he started as a muscleman, stuntman, bodyguard etc), he had a strong West Country accent. He was hired purely for his build. This clip will make it clear...



    Going back further still, here in the UK we knew Prowse for a series of educational public road safety TV trailers, where he played the Green Cross Code man...



    But though he uses his own accent in the one above, for some of these trailers he was dubbed by another actor.
    I only clicked on it because I thought it was going to be something more interesting...

  22. #4922
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Thirty years old?! You're off by about 13 years. The movie came out in 1977 (and Lynch spent the preceding 7 years working on it).
    I meant to say, I had not seen it in about 30 years. I didn't see it when it came out.

  23. #4923
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    Not new, but new to my local library and entertaining: Flypaper. A bank robbery comedy.
    if you want money for people with minds that hate, all I can tell you is brother you have to wait

  24. #4924
    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    Prowse was never going to have his voice used for Darth Vader, because apart from not being an actor per se (he started as a muscleman, stuntman, bodyguard etc), he had a strong West Country accent. He was hired purely for his build.
    I remember one interview where he said he was offered the choice of playing either Darth Vader or Chewbacca, and his response was, "Which ones the baddie? Because everyone remembers the baddie!"

    He wasn't the only Star Wars villain whose voice was dubbed by someone else. Apparently, Jeremy Bulloch had trouble with his lines on the set of The Empire Strikes Back, and so Lucas simply had another actor dub them during ADR sessions.


    Going back further still, here in the UK we knew Prowse for a series of educational public road safety TV trailers, where he played the Green Cross Code man...
    That was the mid 70's, wasn't it? Not that far before Star Wars. I recall Prowse saying that was the role he was most proud of.

    BTW, bringing up both Star Wars and The Tomorrow People, as I did earlier, reminds me of something I read in Starlog way back in 1981 or whenever it was. At the time, Nickelodeon just went on the air, and one of the shows they were running was The Tomorrow People, which Starlog felt obliged to run like a half page article (great job, running an article on a show that stopped production 3 years ago, guys!). They mention that most of the actors would be unfamiliar to American readers, except noting that Peter Davison (and his wife at the time, the one with the shrill voice who later played Trillian in the TV version of The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy) was in a two parter.

    They put out an interesting point. You may recall that when the third Star Wars movie (dont' give me any of that Episode VI crap, you know what I mean) was announced, the title was given as Revenge Of The Jedi (later changed to Return Of The Jedi because Lucas decided that Jedis don't "do" revenge). One of the Tomorrow People serials was called The Revenge Of Jedikiah (Jedikah being this evil shape shifting robot that plagued the show's protagonists on several occasions). The last line of the article was: "Could Lucas be a fan?"

    Probably just an accident, but George Lucas was in the UK during the time show was airing on Thames Television, though maybe not during the time that The Revenge Of Jedikiah aired (which was in 1974), and back in those days the Brits didn't really do reruns (Peter Davison comments on the A Man For Emily DVD commentary that he never saw the story, which was his first work in television, because he was working on something else, and I think Elizabeth Sladen said something similar about not seeing her last episode of Doctor Who).

  25. #4925
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    Kentucky Fried Movie (1978)

    Could NOT get away with this anymore! One of the original satire films. Directed by John Landis
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