Thread: Movies - Take Two. Action!

  1. #5776
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    Quote Originally Posted by hippypants View Post
    The Raid 1 & 2
    The Wailing
    The Chaser
    I loved The Wailing and been wanting to watch Chaser for a while now and for some reason it keeps getting put on the backburner. When I was reading about The Night Comes for Us they made many references to the Raid movies, so will definitely be checking those out.

    ...btw, TNCFU was enjoyable...I wouldn't go all out and say it was phenomenal, but definitely enjoyable. The female bad-ass's were the best IMHO

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    If it ain't acousmatique-It's crap

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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Never Grow Old on prime. A hybrid western/horror starring John Cusack as a very evil bastage. Creepy and artistic. Great.
    This shall be watched tonite...thx for the headsup Frank

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    Michael
    If it ain't acousmatique-It's crap

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    "Hard Eight", starring Philip Baker Hall, John C. Reilly, Gwyneth Paltrow and the ubiquitous Samuel L. Jackson. Written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson.
    I only knew Hall from his portrayal as the library cop in Seinfeld. He's great in this film, as a professional gambler who takes a down-and-out Reilly under his wing and teaches him the tricks of the trade. Reilly's convincing as the small-timer player. And Jackson turns in his usual magnetic performance. There's an interesting twist in the third act and it's interesting to see "Mr. Bookman" engaging in gunplay. Not a bad way to spend 100 minutes.
    No matter how corrupt, greedy, and heartless our government, our corporations, our media, and our religious and charitable institutions may become, the music will still be wonderful. - Kurt Vonnegut

  4. #5779
    Studmuffin Scott Bails's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by headcrash View Post
    "Hard Eight", starring Philip Baker Hall, John C. Reilly, Gwyneth Paltrow and the ubiquitous Samuel L. Jackson. Written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson.
    I only knew Hall from his portrayal as the library cop in Seinfeld. He's great in this film, as a professional gambler who takes a down-and-out Reilly under his wing and teaches him the tricks of the trade. Reilly's convincing as the small-timer player. And Jackson turns in his usual magnetic performance. There's an interesting twist in the third act and it's interesting to see "Mr. Bookman" engaging in gunplay. Not a bad way to spend 100 minutes.
    Phillip Baker Hall and Phillip Seymour Hoffman in the same film??? Is that even allowed?

    This sounds like one I'd like. Adding it to the list.
    Music isn't about chops, or even about talent - it's about sound and the way that sound communicates to people. Mike Keneally

  5. #5780
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Bails View Post
    Phillip Baker Hall and Phillip Seymour Hoffman in the same film??? Is that even allowed?

    This sounds like one I'd like. Adding it to the list.
    PSH is just a cameo, but typically brilliant, as an obnoxious drunk craps player.
    No matter how corrupt, greedy, and heartless our government, our corporations, our media, and our religious and charitable institutions may become, the music will still be wonderful. - Kurt Vonnegut

  6. #5781
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by headcrash View Post
    "Hard Eight", starring Philip Baker Hall, John C. Reilly, Gwyneth Paltrow and the ubiquitous Samuel L. Jackson. Written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson.
    I only knew Hall from his portrayal as the library cop in Seinfeld.
    Wow, he's been in a ton of stuff, I'm sure you've seen him in more than just Seinfeld (BTW, check him out as the doctor in Curb Your Enthusiasm - hilarious). The film you mention is where he got really noticed, but he's in other P.T. Anderson films too, as well as many other great performances. He should have won a ton of awards for his portrayal of Nixon in Robert Altman's Secret Honor - where Hall was the only actor in the film.
    Interviewer of reprobate ne'er-do-well musicians of the long-haired rock n' roll persuasion at: www.velvetthunder.co.uk

  7. #5782
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Bails View Post
    Phillip Baker Hall and Phillip Seymour Hoffman in the same film??? Is that even allowed?

    This sounds like one I'd like. Adding it to the list.
    Quote Originally Posted by headcrash View Post
    PSH is just a cameo, but typically brilliant, as an obnoxious drunk craps player.
    Phil Seymour Hoffman graduated from my HS (Fairport HS near Rochester NY) and had my olde man as his biology teacher there. Apparently a great kid/guy.

  8. #5783
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Philip Seymour Hoffman was his generation's Brando or De Niro. I read a comment about him in Rolling Stone that I couldn't agree with more:

    No modern actor was better at making you feel sympathy for fucking idiots, failures, degenerates, sad sacks and hangdogs dealt a bum hand by life, even as no, especially when he played them with all of their worst qualities front and center. But Philip Seymour Hoffman had a range that seemed all-encompassing, and he could breathe life into any role he took on: a famous author, a globetrotting party-boy aristocrat, a German counterintelligence agent, a charismatic cult leader, a genius who planned games of death in dystopic futures. He added heft to low-budget art films, and nuance and unpredictability to blockbuster franchises. He was a transformative performer who worked from the inside out, blessed with an emotional transparency that could be overwhelming, invigorating, compelling, devastating. And above all, Hoffman had a talent for pinpointing the humanistic even in the most horrible characters. (Rolling Stone: Philip Seymour Hoffman, 1967-2014)

    I've rarely felt as sad about an entertainer's passing than his. The only others I can think of that I felt as bad about are Stanley Kubrick, Isaac Asimov (given the circumstances), George Harrison, and Sydney Pollack.
    "For the near future, there are favorable implications in the fact that the recent reactions have not gone even as far down as the low point, which would have been normal."

  9. #5784
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    The funny thing is I always think about his opening role with the Mission Impossible series, embodying evil.
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

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    We had an afternoon movie today with Murder By Death from 1976. An old fashioned stormy mansion comedy whodunnit written by Neil Simon, with a star-studded cast (Alec Guinness, David Niven, Peter Sellers, Peter Falk, Maggie Smith among others). Still very, very funny although a few aspects wouldn't go over well with today's woke culture. But we really loved it.
    Interviewer of reprobate ne'er-do-well musicians of the long-haired rock n' roll persuasion at: www.velvetthunder.co.uk

  11. #5786
    Studmuffin Scott Bails's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    The funny thing is I always think about his opening role with the Mission Impossible series, embodying evil.
    Yeah, he nailed that part.
    Music isn't about chops, or even about talent - it's about sound and the way that sound communicates to people. Mike Keneally

  12. #5787
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    We had an afternoon movie today with Murder By Death from 1976. An old fashioned stormy mansion comedy whodunnit written by Neil Simon, with a star-studded cast (Alec Guinness, David Niven, Peter Sellers, Peter Falk, Maggie Smith among others). Still very, very funny although a few aspects wouldn't go over well with today's woke culture. But we really loved it.
    Great movie
    Ian

    Gordon Haskell - "You've got to keep the groove in your head and play a load of bollocks instead"
    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
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  13. #5788
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    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    Great movie
    It really is. I love Peter Sellers anyway, but the whole cast is superb. I think I need to re-watch Being There very soon.
    Interviewer of reprobate ne'er-do-well musicians of the long-haired rock n' roll persuasion at: www.velvetthunder.co.uk

  14. #5789
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Watched a couple of movies over the past week:

    Thief, with James Caan. Not what I expected, which was a heist movie. On Wikipedia it's described as a "neo-noir action thriller", which is why I expected a heist movie. Jesus Christ, it was none of the above. This was a drama - and as much a character study - with hardly any action. I was disappointed with it, especially when the story got to the big heist, which lasted all of ten minutes and, while apparently authentic, too clinical and, consequently, uninteresting. Indeed, anti-climactic. On top of that, there was another 30 minutes of the movie left. I might have liked it had the denouement been satisfactory but nope. After James Caan goes to the boss's house and takes care of business, he walks away and the credits begin. So, I guess he just leaves his wife & kid????? A 90 second epilogue, a la The Shawshank Redemption, showing his reunion with his family would have worked just fine.

    I also thought many scenes were too long. I will say, tho, that no one put in a bad performance and Robert Prosky, as "Leo", was excellent.

    I really shouldn't be surprised, tho, since Michael Mann has made only three movies I've enjoyed: The Last of the Mohicans, Collateral, and Heat, his best movie.

    Curious about whether my reaction was totally off-base, I checked the ratings. It scored well on RottenTomatoes (94%/81%). I also saw a reference to Vincent Canby's review of it. Canby was a reviewer with the NY Times I discovered in the early '80s when I was in the service and never got to see movie trailers on TV. He prompted me to see such great films as the Coen's Blood Simple and The Gods Must Be Crazy and I noticed after awhile he was the reviewer whose opinion most closely matched mine (e.g. The Adventures of Buckaroo Bonzai; he liked it, too). His rating of Thief was 2/5. 'Nuff said.



    The Game, with Michael Douglas. Leaving the viewer guessing right up to the end, this was a thoroughly entertaining movie and so well written. 'Nuff said.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Bails View Post
    I really liked [The Game]. But you can really only watch it once.
    I get your point, but I felt like watching it again as soon as I finished it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    I think I need to re-watch Being There very soon.
    It's been a long time since I've seen it but I love that movie. The ending is one of the best ever.
    "For the near future, there are favorable implications in the fact that the recent reactions have not gone even as far down as the low point, which would have been normal."

  15. #5790
    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    We had an afternoon movie today with Murder By Death from 1976. An old fashioned stormy mansion comedy whodunnit written by Neil Simon, with a star-studded cast (Alec Guinness, David Niven, Peter Sellers, Peter Falk, Maggie Smith among others). Still very, very funny although a few aspects wouldn't go over well with today's woke culture. But we really loved it.
    When he appeared on Letterman back in the mid 80's, Sir Alec said it was when he was working on Murder By Death that the first received the script for a certain space opera, I shouldn't have to say which one, I don't think. He said when he realized it was science fiction, his initial thought was, "It's not for me", and he thought the dialog was dreadful, but he felt it was a real page turner, and apparently, he had been impressed by American Graffiti.

    At any rate, Murder By Death really is a fun movie. I love Peter Falk as Sam Diamond. That bit where Truman Capote says he's still sitting at the other end of the dinner table, and Falk reaches for his gun and says, "Then you won't mind if I..." and Capote says, "Don't! It doesn't always work!". I thought that was a great bit.

    Still very, very funny although a few aspects wouldn't go over well with today's woke culture.
    You mean like casting Peter Sellers as an Asian.

  16. #5791
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    The Stranger--Orson Welles, etc., done in a Hitchcock style, well made movie.
    Bad Times at the El Royale--seemed to be influenced by the Coen brothers, maybe Tarantino too.
    The Mortuary Collection--short films like Tales from the Crypt make up the movie that wrap around the main characters, pretty well produced, and sort of dark comedy in parts of it.
    Madame Sin--007-like film starring Robert Wagner and Bettie Davis, pretty fun, see it on YT.
    Promising Young Female--sort of revenge film, didn't care for it that much.

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    We saw the new Bob Odenkirk movie "Nobody" tonight. The movie is good but not great. Bob does a solid job in the lead role. I would give it 3.5 stars.

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