Thread: Movies - Take Two. Action!

  1. #5176
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    I
    Something else I just learned is that she was previously married to David McCallum (The Man From U.N.C.L.E.)..
    Abby: I wonder what Ducky looked like when he was young
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    He was in a movie I always liked called Around the World Under The Sea, with Lloyd Bridges, Shirley Eaton (the gold girl from Goldfinger), Brian Kelly (Porter from the original Flipper series) and Keenan Wynn. Dumb movie, but fun to watch once in awhile.

  2. #5177
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    I'm not sure I saw "10 To Midnight."
    You haven't missed anything. I saw both it and Death Wish II in the theater. There's $5 and 3 hours I'll never get back.

    I remember much of "From Noon Till Three," which stars both Bronson and the beautiful Jill Ireland. I'll watch it again whenever it turns up on the TV channel that shows mostly Westerns. Pretty good, and funny.
    I could never get onboard with the idea of "comedy western", Paint Your Wagon, Support Your Local Sheriff!, and Blazing Saddles notwithstanding. Cat Ballou is supposed to be good but I don't remember it or if I've even seen the whole movie. But I'll file away From Noon till Three if I ever run across it on a Sat or Sun afternoon.
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  3. #5178
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    Hellboy II - Pretty impressive visual effects.
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  4. #5179
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    I never had the same reaction to him but all your guys' talk about him finally pushed me to peruse his filmography.

    I just discovered he was in Pat & Mike, the old Tracy/Hepburn movie. I also finally saw Jubal a little while back; he had a supporting role in that. He also played Machine Gun Kelly in the Roger Corman movie of the same name, which I saw when I was a kid.

    Mostly I remember Bronson from his biggies: The Magnificent Seven, The Great Escape, The Dirty Dozen, and Once Upon a Time in the West.

    I've also seen many of his '70s movies in which he was the lead, almost all of which I was unimpressed with and/or remember little about, with two exceptions. The first is Telefon, which also starred Lee Remick. I really liked that movie, even tho it's a little slow at times. The second is Death Wish, which he was good in - he always is, really - but the movie just seemed derivative of the Dirty Harry movies to me and seemed pointless.

    I know I've seen The Mechanic but my memories of it are always confused it with Thunderbolt and Lightfoot, the Clint Eastwood movie, which was probably derivative of it. I don't remember having any negative reactions to it, tho.

    But The Valachi Papers, Chino, Mr. Majestyk, Breakheart Pass, The White Buffalo, Death Wish II, and 10 to Midnight were all pretty forgettable and I never saw another one of his movies after.

    One thing I could never quite figure out is how he ended up with Jill Ireland, who co-starred in 15 of his movies. I always thought she was a real beauty.

    Something else I just learned is that she was previously married to David McCallum (The Man From U.N.C.L.E.). Bronson & Ireland met during the filming of The Great Escape which McCallum was in, also. She and McCallum, who'd been married for 10 years, divorced in '67. She married Bronson in '68 and they were together until her death from breast cancer in '90.
    Telefon; The woods are dark and deep , and I haves miles to go before I sleep.
    In no way is The Mechanic derivitive of Thunderbolt and Lightfoot. No similarities whatever.
    Also I see a big difference with Dirty Harry and Death Wish. I was a sophmore in HS and commuting on the subway for school. The city was a shitshow back then and Death Wish struck a chord. It was a hugely popular movie and stirred up all kinds of controversy. Alot of location filming and a huge crowd pleaser. Good movie.

  5. #5180
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    Lee Marvin in Cat Ballou

  6. #5181
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nycsteve View Post
    In no way is The Mechanic derivitive of Thunderbolt and Lightfoot. No similarities whatever.
    Obviously, The Mechanic couldn't be derivative since it was released two years prior. I meant that T&L was probably derivative of The Mechanic.

    And I say "probably derivative" because of the superficial similarity (veteran criminal taking on a protege). But it's one of Hollywood's age old MOs. When a movie seemingly comes out of left field and does well, other studios look for something like it thinking it will be a sure thing.

    Also I see a big difference with Dirty Harry and Death Wish. I was a sophmore in HS and commuting on the subway for school. The city was a shitshow back then and Death Wish struck a chord. It was a hugely popular movie and stirred up all kinds of controversy. Alot of location filming and a huge crowd pleaser. Good movie.
    I see the differences, definitely. But the overarching theme of each is of a man taking the law into his own hands and fighting back against violent criminals; one just happens to have a badge. (you may recall that Harry gets in trouble for not doing things by the book, as well as shooting the antagonist instead of arresting him)
    Last edited by Hal...; 2 Weeks Ago at 12:18 PM.
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  7. #5182
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    Lee Marvin in Cat Ballou
    I do remember that scene and the young guy in the top hat. It must have been a really long time ago when I saw it. And, lucky me, they have it at the library. I may have to do a triple feature with Support Your Local Sheriff and Support Your Local Gunfighter, both of which are also at the library.

    Lee Marvin was obviously good at crime movies and westerns, but he was so good at comedy, too. He was great in Paint Your Wagon.

    Have you ever heard the story about him that Roger Ebert tells? This is from an interview with Siskel & Ebert on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross discussing how publicists have changed things for journalists when interviewing celebrities:

    GROSS: You both have done profiles of actors in addition to reviewing movies. You write feature stories. My experience is that sometimes actors are very temperamental and that if you're not asking them questions that will help them promote their film, if you go what publicists like to call off-topic, that they'll sometimes get very temperamental and even walk out.

    EBERT: It didn't use to be that way. I mean the key word in your observation is publicist. When I started, you kind of hung out with the stars. I mean Gene and I remember a day when John Wayne came to town to see his friend Step'n Fetchit, who was dying in University of Chicago Hospital. And he called up the movie critics and said, "Come on over here to the Conrad Hilton and we'll drink some tequila and talk."

    And we, the four movie critics at that time, turned up, you know, with our tongues hanging out, delighted to just sit around and talk with the Duke for a while. Well, these days, of course, with spin control, you'd have somebody feeding him his soundbites, you know.

    And I've done many interviews in the past where you really got to spend time with a person in an unstructured environment, maybe in an environment where they didn't always look their best. As, for example, the day I spent with Lee Marvin when he was dead drunk. And yet it was a very good story. He liked it. He talked to me again many times later in his career. He thought it was a good story about that day.

    Gross: Did you have any publicists from Lee Marvin's movie call you up and say please don't mention that he was drunk, please don't quote certain things that he's saying?

    Ebert: "Please don't mention that the dog came out of his bedroom with a pair of panties in its mouth." And his girlfriend said, "Whose are those panties?" And Lee Marvin said, "Michelle, those are your panties." And she said, "Those are not my panties." And Marvin said, "Bad dog!"

    I love that story.
    If God wanted us to listen to audio books, She wouldn't have given us eyes to watch TV. - Gene Belcher

  8. #5183
    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal...
    I do remember that scene and the young guy in the top hat. It must have been a really long time ago when I saw it. And, lucky me, they have it at the library. I may have to do a triple feature with Support Your Local Sheriff and Support Your Local Gunfighter, both of which are also at the library.
    Good call. I own all three. I love westerns, including western comedies. Not keen on western musicals, though.

    Another western comedy recommendation: Evil Roy Slade (1972) starring John Astin as the title character.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ebert & Gross
    Ebert: And I've done many interviews in the past where you really got to spend time with a person in an unstructured environment, maybe in an environment where they didn't always look their best. As, for example, the day I spent with Lee Marvin when he was dead drunk. And yet it was a very good story. He liked it. He talked to me again many times later in his career. He thought it was a good story about that day.

    Gross: Did you have any publicists from Lee Marvin's movie call you up and say please don't mention that he was drunk, please don't quote certain things that he's saying?

    Ebert: "Please don't mention that the dog came out of his bedroom with a pair of panties in its mouth." And his girlfriend said, "Whose are those panties?" And Lee Marvin said, "Michelle, those are your panties." And she said, "Those are not my panties." And Marvin said, "Bad dog!"

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    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    Been watching the Masters of Horror TV series from a few years back. Last night I watched Imprint by Takashi Miike. I can see why they banned it. There are many good episodes, and a few duds.

  10. #5185
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    Kill List--British hitman, horror film. The less you know perhaps the better the film. It was an okay watch.

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    I don't know how many of you buy Blu-Rays or DVDs, but Amazon right now has Hereditary, The Witch, and Under The Skin for sale at under $10 each. I'm not really a fan of The Witch, but for $5 for a Blu-Ray, I figured I'd give it a chance to convince me.
    He did not know that the sword he'd hold, would turn his priceless empire into fool's gold...

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  12. #5187
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    Watched Out Of The Past last night. A great film noir from 1947, before I was born. About a week ago, we were watching a travel video on youtube about the town of Bridgeport, California in Mono County in the Sierra Nevada. They mentioned that there was a movie made in the town, Out Of The Past, so I had to see it, having been to Bridgeport many times. Fortunately our library has the DVD. Stars Robert Mitchum, Jane Greer, and Kirk Douglas. I recommend this fine movie if you like film noir (or any of the actors) at all, even if you've never been to Bridgeport.


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    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Cat Ballou (1965). I hadn't seen this since I was a kid. Leonard Matlin gave this 3 stars (out of 4). I think it's more like a 2 star movie since it's supposed to be a comedy. Lee Marvin is easily the best thing in it.

    Support Your Local Sheriff (1969). Stars James Garner, Jack Elam, Joan Hackett, Walter Brennan, Harry Morgan, Bruce Dern, and a bunch of recognizable character actors in supporting roles. Can't remember the last time I saw this but I know it was a long time ago. Much better than I remembered. Lots of great, funny lines. The scene with the cannon is still hilarious... and I knew it was coming. Maltin gave this 3 stars. That seems right.

    Support Your Local Gunfighter (1971). Not a sequel, but it does have a similar title and much the same people involved: director Burt Kennedy, producer Bill Finnegan, James Garner, Jack Elam, Harry Morgan, and many of the same character actors from Sheriff. It also stars Susanne Pleshette and co-stars '30s icon Joan Blondell. Not as good as Support Your Local Sheriff but very entertaining nonetheless.

    The Trial of the Chicago 7 (2020). On Netflix. Written and directed by Aaron Sorkin, the brilliant writer behind such great plays/movies/shows as A Few Good Men, The West Wing, Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip (criminally cancelled after only one season), and HBO's The Newsroom. This is a very, very good movie, albeit quite dramatized. I would have given this an A-, maybe. Unfortunately, critical thinking got the better of me and I had to look up some things that I questioned the veracity of. Sorkin played fast and loose with some of the details. I understand that for dramatic purposes writers may sometimes use poetic license but as good as a writer as Sorkin is, it seems ridiculous to do so, especially in this day and age when details and specifics can easily be found on the web (see The Imitation Game as another example). As good as the movie is, I can only give it a B for that reason.
    If God wanted us to listen to audio books, She wouldn't have given us eyes to watch TV. - Gene Belcher

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    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    The Go-Go's--doc on the LA punk band. I was never a fan, but the documentary about their trials and tribulations was okay.

    Wee Geordie--a film unknown to me takes place in Scotland, and as a young lad, Geordie is small in stature, and ridiculed for it, hence the title. He sees one of those Charles Atlas type ads in the newspaper and starts working out. He grows up to be strong enough and encouraged to be in the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia. There's romance, and a look at his family home, which is rather warm in its depiction. Some might say this is an old fashion family film, if so I'd like to see more like it.

    The Finest Hours--is taken from a true story of a ship that needs rescuing during a bad storm off the coast of Cape Cod. It stars Chris Pine as a green recruit to the Coast Guard. I enjoyed the era of the early 50s in which it was shot, but it was a bit too paint-by-the-numbers for me. Many have enjoyed it, but I got rather bored with it.

    Swallow--is about a newly married housewife with a compulsion to swallow things once she gets pregnant. I went into the movie blind thinking maybe it was a body horror, and couldn't help but think this is a dumb premise for a film, and why is this woman doing this when her life is so affluent.? Although slow I kept watching and it starts to reveal all of the answers towards the third act, but it was a bit of a slog. It was okay. Not a high recommendation but more something like three stars.

    Blurred Lines: Inside the Art World on Tubi last night, which gave an inside look at the current world of art. It was interesting, answered some questions, but also a bit nauseating as it seems to be some insular industry that sells to the super rich (top 1,2,3%), and also a house of cards and a pyramid scheme somewhat. To me it seemed like there's an overabundance of art, who is buying it, and who can afford a 60 million dollar painting? That said, it was somewhat interesting and an eye-opener.

    Welcome to the Dollhouse--bittersweet drama, comedy, or dramedey about a young girl in the 7th grade, growing up in suburban New Jersey. Pretty well done although I may have missed the point of the film, if there was one. Worth a watch however.
    Last edited by hippypants; 1 Week Ago at 03:37 PM.

  15. #5190
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    Quote Originally Posted by hippypants View Post
    T
    The Finest Hours--is taken from a true story of a ship that needs rescuing during a bad storm off the coast of Cape Cod. It stars Chris Pine as a green recruit to the Coast Guard. I enjoyed the era of the early 50s in which it was shot, but it was a bit too paint-by-the-numbers for me. Many have enjoyed it, but I got rather bored with it.

    S.
    Quick story about that one. The boat that was used in that rescue in real life is at a small Maritime museum in South Haven Michigan about 45 minutes from where we live. We spend a lot of time in South Haven and have actually been on the boat. They also do rides on the boat out into Lake Michigan in the summer. The boat is really really small and it is amazing that they were able to get that many people on it for the rescue. According to the museum the movie was pretty accurate.

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    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    SteveSly--interesting to hear about that boat. It looked like on the movie at times with all those waves it would actually go under the waves and pop back up. I don't know if that was artistic license, but made for interesting storytelling. It they got that many people on that boat in those waters, it's even more amazing that they made it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hippypants View Post
    SteveSly--interesting to hear about that boat. It looked like on the movie at times with all those waves it would actually go under the waves and pop back up. I don't know if that was artistic license, but made for interesting storytelling. It they got that many people on that boat in those waters, it's even more amazing that they made it.
    I was mistaken. The boat at the museum is the boat that was used in the movie and not the actual rescue boat, although it is the same type of boat used in the rescue. Here is a little blurb on it with pictures if interested: https://www.michiganmaritimemuseum.o...et/uscg-36460/

  18. #5193
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hippypants View Post
    It looked like on the movie at times with all those waves it would actually go under the waves and pop back up. I don't know if that was artistic license, but made for interesting storytelling.
    Nope, they're very buoyant and were designed to be self-righting. They used them up until the '70s. They were replaced by the 44' motor lifeboat in the '60s. The 44s had two watertight cabins (for survivors), one fore and one aft, and were designed so that if they capsized, they would re-right themselves within a minute or two (in reality, it was much less than that). Here's a painting of one, which is pretty accurate:

    u-s-coast-guard-44ft-motor-lifeboat-and-tilt-motor-aircraft-william-h-ravell-iii.jpg

    Do you see the thing just behind the crewmen that looks kind of like a fence (between the two orange posts)? In real life, it was a little wider than that and is a section of chain link fence. When the seas got rough, the crewmen put on a harness that had a tether and clip on each side. They would then clip themselves to that fence so that in the event the boat rolled over, the crewmen wouldn't get separated from it.

    Here's a cool little video of one:



    Incidentally, the narrator is wrong about that being a cutter. "Cutter" is a designation for boats 65 feet and longer.

    The 44' was replaced by the 47', added to the fleet in the mid '90s. It is a much better boat simply for the fact that it can go about 10 knots faster. Here's a picture of one:

    180829-G-AW789-1054.JPG

    FYI, whenever you see a USCG boat and there's a 5 digit number on the bow, the first two numbers (reading left to right) is also the length of the boat.
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  19. #5194
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    We watched one of our horror faves tonight, Tim Burton's Sleepy Hollow. The sets, production design, and cinematography were just stunning on this one; the plot was pretty tightly wound. A stellar cast of veteran Brits surrounding Depp and Ricci.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  20. #5195
    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    Watched Out Of The Past last night. A great film noir from 1947, before I was born. About a week ago, we were watching a travel video on youtube about the town of Bridgeport, California in Mono County in the Sierra Nevada. They mentioned that there was a movie made in the town, Out Of The Past, so I had to see it, having been to Bridgeport many times. Fortunately our library has the DVD. Stars Robert Mitchum, Jane Greer, and Kirk Douglas. I recommend this fine movie if you like film noir (or any of the actors) at all, even if you've never been to Bridgeport.

    Seconded. One of the better Noirs.

  21. #5196
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    Watched Guns Akimbo last night. A 2019 action/comedy movie starring Daniel Radcliffe and Samara Weaving. A loser programmer is forced to take part in a violent, real-life video game. I liked it.

  22. #5197
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    Nope, they're very buoyant

    They looked pretty buoyant from that video clip. Thanks Hal.

    I've been watching some episodes from the Brit series, Tale of the Unexpected. They are introduced by writer, Roald Dahl, and along the lines of The Twilight Zone, Thriller, or something like that. If you have a Roku you can watch them on Tubi TV and some of the series is on YT.

    Black Sunday--a Mario Bava story about a witch's revenge on their descendants. Not scary, but stepped in atmosphere.

  23. #5198
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    David Crosby: Remember My Name--sort of a warts and all documentary about Crosby and his career.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hippypants View Post
    David Crosby: Remember My Name--sort of a warts and all documentary about Crosby and his career.
    I have read both of Crosby's books. Very interesting stuff. The guy certainly led the rock n roll life.

  25. #5200
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hippypants View Post
    David Crosby: Remember My Name--sort of a warts and all documentary about Crosby and his career.
    I thought it was well done. True, pulled no punches but I think David was presented in a positive light.
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