Thread: Movies - Take Two. Action!

  1. #2276
    Irritated Lawn Guy Klonk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lou View Post
    ^^^

    On Netflix?
    I bought the Bluray. I don't think it's streaming yet.
    "Who would have thought a whale would be so heavy?" - Moe

  2. #2277
    Irritated Lawn Guy Klonk's Avatar
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    ...it's rentable on Amazon.
    "Who would have thought a whale would be so heavy?" - Moe

  3. #2278
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    I've heard younger people (Gen Xers & Millennials) refer to them as a boy band but they don't get it.
    WHere the frell did that nonsense come from? I remember reading an article about...it was either Backstreet Boys or N'Sync in, I think TV Guide, and one of them said something like, "Oh, you know The Beatles were a boy band too". And I thought, "Dude, when you totally turn the genre upside down two or three times, then you get try to make it sound like you're in the same company as The Beatles".

    I know of no boy band who has ever done anything even remotely as revelatory as Tomorrow Never Knows, I'm Only Sleeping, Strawberry Fields Forever, Come Together, or Let It Be itself.

  4. #2279
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    I know of no boy band who has ever done anything even remotely as revelatory as Tomorrow Never Knows, I'm Only Sleeping, Strawberry Fields Forever, Come Together, or Let It Be itself.
    Because a boy band is a manufactured entity designed for mass culture (as opposed to popular culture; a contrast first proposed by Robert Fripp) that doesn't write its own music. Its purpose is only to sell as many records and merchandise as possible. The singers are, in essence, musical prostitutes. That's not to say they don't have any talent (just look at Justin Timberlake) but that's not their purpose.
    I love sleeping. It's like being dead without the commitment.

  5. #2280
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    Deadly Detention

    On Netflix. This is a throwback to the old slasher type films. Annoying group of high schoolers get detention.
    Due to a rabid possum infestation at their school (I'm not making this up) they are bused to an empty
    shut down prison to serve their Saturday detention. Body count begins. This is actually a lot better than
    it has any right to be. No gore whatsoever, but suspenseful at times. Held my interest throughout.
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  6. #2281
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    A movie I saw on Netflix, recently, is Velvet Buzzsaw, written & directed by Dan Gilroy, who also wrote & directed Nightcrawler. From Netflix: "A feared critic, an icy gallery owner, and an ambitious assistant snap up a recently deceased artist's stash of paintings - with dire consequences." Stars Jake Gyllenhaal, Rene Russo, Toni Collette, and John Malkovich.

    I really wanted to like this movie - the cast is excellent (Gyllenhaal & Collette, especially) as is the direction & production - but the story wallows in a nastiness while criticizing superficial L.A. culture to the extent that it feels too long. The only good part is when the characters start dying. Which I guess is the point of the story. Over all, however, it's not fun, it's not scary, nor is it even suspenseful. Altho, it may be worth sitting through just to see the very original way the last person dies.
    I love sleeping. It's like being dead without the commitment.

  7. #2282
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    Because a boy band is a manufactured entity designed for mass culture (as opposed to popular culture; a contrast first proposed by Robert Fripp) that doesn't write its own music. Its purpose is only to sell as many records and merchandise as possible. The singers are, in essence, musical prostitutes. That's not to say they don't have any talent (just look at Justin Timberlake) but that's not their purpose.
    Which returns me to my original question, which was, where did this "The Beatles were a boy band" dren come from in the first frelling place?!

  8. #2283
    Member Since: 3/27/2002 MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    Because a boy band is a manufactured entity designed for mass culture (as opposed to popular culture; a contrast first proposed by Robert Fripp) that doesn't write its own music. Its purpose is only to sell as many records and merchandise as possible. The singers are, in essence, musical prostitutes. That's not to say they don't have any talent (just look at Justin Timberlake) but that's not their purpose.
    were The Monkees the first boy band then?
    Why is it whenever someone mentions an artist that was clearly progressive (yet not the Symph weenie definition of Prog) do certain people feel compelled to snort "thats not Prog" like a whiny 5th grader?

  9. #2284
    Quote Originally Posted by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER View Post
    were The Monkees the first boy band then?
    Surely, The Monkees couldn't have been the first. I imagine there were any number of vocal groups going back to the 50's, at least, who were assembled based on the individual members' good looks or whatever.

    For the record, when Michael Clarke joined The Byrds, had zero experience as a professional musician. He was brought into the band because he looked like a "cross between two of the Rolling Stones" (presumably Brian Jones and Mick Jagger). So one could argue The Byrds had a "boy band" element to them, as someone probably decided that neither Chris Hillman, Roger McGuinn, David Crosby, nor Gene Clark "looked" had the right "appeal", so they figured it was better to hire a non-musician who looked good and teach him how to play the drums, then get a drummer who didn't look good. I guess. Maybe it's just down to dumb luck they picked a good looking "non-musician" who had the ability to learn how to play the drums.

  10. #2285
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    There were no "boy bands" in the 1960s or 1970s. Neither the term nor the concept existed. People who want to take the term, "boy band" from whatever decade it came into use, and apply it to earlier bands, are high. Time travel ain't gonna happen.

  11. #2286
    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    There were no "boy bands" in the 1960s or 1970s. Neither the term nor the concept existed.
    So you're saying there weren't groups that were put together by management, record company execs, etc, based on how well they'd appeal to teen girls, during the 60's or 70's, huh? I would dispute that claim.

    It's certainly a known fact that there were a lot of "teen idol" singers during that era who basically got record deals based on their looks, with little or no experience as a singer.
    Last edited by GuitarGeek; 02-18-2019 at 12:27 AM.

  12. #2287
    There's a few contradictions in this piece, but it demonstrates the point that boy bands existed as far back as the 50's, if not earlier, even if they weren't being called "boy bands" yet.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wikipedia
    A boy band (or boyband) is loosely defined as a vocal group consisting of young male singers, usually in their teenage years or in their twenties at the time of formation, singing love songs marketed towards young women. Being vocal groups, most boy band members do not play musical instruments, either in recording sessions or on stage, making the term something of a misnomer. However, exceptions do exist. Many boy bands dance as well as sing, usually giving highly choreographed performances.

    Some such bands form on their own. They can evolve out of church choral or gospel music groups, but are often created by talent managers or record producers who hold auditions. Due to this and their general commercial orientation towards a female audience of preteens, teenyboppers, or teens, the term may be used with negative connotations in music journalism. Boy bands are similar in concept to their counterparts, girl groups. Boy bands' popularity peaked four times: in the 1960s (e.g., The Jackson 5), in the 1990s and early 2000s when acts such as the Backstreet Boys, *NSYNC, A1 and Westlife, among others, dominated the top of the Billboard and pop charts, in the early 2010s with the emergence of new boy bands such as JLS, Big Time Rush and One Direction, and in the late 2010s with pop groups such as BTS and 5 Seconds of Summer.

    The earliest forerunner of boy band music began in the late 19th century as a cappella barbershop quartets. They were usually a group of males and sang in four-part harmonies. Barbershop quartets were popular into the earlier part of the 20th century. A revival of the male vocal group took place in the late 1940s and 1950s with the use of doo-wop music. Doo-wop bands sang about topics such as love and other themes used in pop music. The earliest traces of boy bands were in the mid-1950s although the term boy band was not used. African American vocal group The Ink Spots was one of the first of what would now be called boy bands. The term boy band was not established until the late 1980s as before that they were called male vocal groups or "hep harmony singing groups".

    Although the term "boy band" was not commonly used yet, the earliest predecessors of this format were groups such as the Jackson 5 and the Osmonds which helped form the template for boy bands. The Jackson 5 were a siblings group that established many musical conventions that boy bands follow. For instance, their music featured close harmonies from soul music and catchy pop hooks influenced as much as they were by Motown and acts like the Supremes. The group also incorporated choreographed dance moves to their performances. All members of the band sang, which is a common convention of a boy band, as opposed to having a front man and the rest on instruments; thus, no one person dominated the stage.[citation needed] Also a sibilings group, The Osmonds first started singing barbershop music for local audiences, before being hired to perform at Disneyland early in their career. Their appearance in a televised Disney special earned them additional TV spots, such as The Andy Williams Show and The Jerry Lewis Show

    Other antecedents (apart from those already mentioned) exist throughout the history of pop music. The genre has been copied into languages and cultures other than the Anglo-American. The Puerto Rican boy band Menudo, appealing to young Latina audiences, was founded in 1977. Menudo had a convention unique among boy bands: when a member turned 16, became too tall, or their voice changed, they were replaced. The members of Menudo were generally aged 12–16.

    The Bay City Rollers were a Scottish pop band who were most popular in the mid-1970s. The British Hit Singles & Albums noted that they were "tartan teen sensations from Edinburgh", and were "the first of many acts heralded as the 'Biggest Group since The Beatles' and one of the most screamed-at teeny-bopper acts of the 1970s". For a fairly brief but fervent period (nicknamed "Rollermania"), they were worldwide teen idols. The group were one of the first bands, like The Monkees before them, to take the formula shown by The Beatles and apply it to a teen market. The group achieved the same amount of success but for a limited period of time. At the peak of their popularity in the UK, comparisons were being made to The Beatles. Also by this time, Bay City Roller fans had a completely distinctive style of dress, the main elements of which were ankle-length tartan trousers and tartan scarves, the group using the benefit of merchandise and promotion.

    In the US, the Cleveland-based power pop group Raspberries was generally interpreted as a "teen act", although all the band members played their own music. Vocalist Eric Carmen later commented, "It was not hip for people to like us, because their little sister liked us."

    Boston group New Edition was formed in 1978 and reached their height of popularity in the 1980s, meaning they are often credited for starting the boy-band trend, even though the term "boy band" did not exist until the 1990s. Maurice Starr was influenced by New Edition and popularized it with his protégé New Kids on the Block, the first commercially successful modern boy band, who formed in 1984 and found international success in 1988. Starr's idea was to take the traditional template from the R&B genre (in this case his teenage band New Edition) and apply it to a pop genre.

  13. #2288
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER View Post
    were The Monkees the first boy band then?
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Surely, The Monkees couldn't have been the first. I imagine there were any number of vocal groups going back to the 50's, at least, who were assembled based on the individual members' good looks or whatever.
    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    There were no "boy bands" in the 1960s or 1970s. Neither the term nor the concept existed. People who want to take the term, "boy band" from whatever decade it came into use, and apply it to earlier bands, are high. Time travel ain't gonna happen.
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    So you're saying there weren't groups that were put together by management, record company execs, etc, based on how well they'd appeal to teen girls, during the 60's or 70's, huh? I would dispute that claim.

    It's certainly a known fact that there were a lot of "teen idol" singers during that era who basically got record deals based on their looks, with little or no experience as a singer.
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    There's a few contradictions in this piece, but it demonstrates the point that boy bands existed as far back as the 50's, if not earlier, even if they weren't being called "boy bands" yet.
    I would love to respond to these comments but am choosing not to so we don't hijack this thread. Does anyone care enough to start another thread to discuss it more?
    I love sleeping. It's like being dead without the commitment.

  14. #2289
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    I would love to respond to these comments but am choosing not to so we don't hijack this thread. Does anyone care enough to start another thread to discuss it more?
    Done!

  15. #2290
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    A movie I saw on Netflix, recently, is Velvet Buzzsaw, written & directed by Dan Gilroy, who also wrote & directed Nightcrawler. From Netflix: "A feared critic, an icy gallery owner, and an ambitious assistant snap up a recently deceased artist's stash of paintings - with dire consequences." Stars Jake Gyllenhaal, Rene Russo, Toni Collette, and John Malkovich.

    I really wanted to like this movie - the cast is excellent (Gyllenhaal & Collette, especially) as is the direction & production - but the story wallows in a nastiness while criticizing superficial L.A. culture to the extent that it feels too long. The only good part is when the characters start dying. Which I guess is the point of the story. Over all, however, it's not fun, it's not scary, nor is it even suspenseful. Altho, it may be worth sitting through just to see the very original way the last person dies.
    I too was underwhelmed by this.
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  16. #2291
    Irritated Lawn Guy Klonk's Avatar
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    Horror movie/board game fans in here will surely appreciate this...

    http://https://mixtapemassacre.com

    I ordered it last night Our game nights just took a gloriously dark turn...
    "Who would have thought a whale would be so heavy?" - Moe

  17. #2292
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klonk View Post
    Horror movie/board game fans in here will surely appreciate this...

    http://https://mixtapemassacre.com

    I ordered it last night Our game nights just took a gloriously dark turn...
    That looks awesome. Look forward to your first hand review.
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  18. #2293
    Watched the back half of Ferris Bueller's Day Off again. Still a fun movie, even with all the illogical stuff that happens in it (how the frell does a teenager con his parents into buying him a $7,000 sampler?!). "Oh, Mr. Rooney, you left your wallet on the kitchen floor!"

  19. #2294
    Irritated Lawn Guy Klonk's Avatar
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    The Babysitter

    oh boy... pure over the top, ridiculous, enjoyment for this horror/comedy fan. Loved it!
    "Who would have thought a whale would be so heavy?" - Moe

  20. #2295
    Member Dave the Brave's Avatar
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    I watched A Star Is Born twice this last weekend.

    The second time was because my wife was'nt home, and I was so impressed that I was willing to give it a twofer.

    Lady Gaga has gained a lot more respect from me due to her performance.

    DtB

  21. #2296
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    ^ You weren't wowed by her turn in American Horror Story?
    "If you want to see the true nature of humanity, just look at the internet."

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  22. #2297
    Member nosebone's Avatar
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    Got around to Bohemian Rhapsody last night.

    It was OK, could have been a Netflix movie quality wise.

    Here's what irked me the most - No background on Freddie's childhood or musical training.

    I mean, that music doesn't just appear out of thin air.

    If it was an R rated movie it could have gotten darker , more perverse and interesting imo.

    And why recreate the Live Aid set when you can watch the real thing on Youtube!

    I dunno, I never was a big Queen fan anyway. I saw them at MSG in NY in 77 and left early because they were playing along to tapes which bugged me at the time.
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  23. #2298
    Quote Originally Posted by nosebone View Post
    Got around to Bohemian Rhapsody last night.

    It was OK, could have been a Netflix movie quality wise.

    Here's what irked me the most - No background on Freddie's childhood or musical training.

    I mean, that music doesn't just appear out of thin air.

    If it was an R rated movie it could have gotten darker , more perverse and interesting imo.

    And why recreate the Live Aid set when you can watch the real thing on Youtube!

    I dunno, I never was a big Queen fan anyway. I saw them at MSG in NY in 77 and left early because they were playing along to tapes which bugged me at the time.
    I also saw Queen at the Garden , might have been in 77. I also noticed a lot of prerecorded material , and while I didn't leave , I would never have seen them again. Was also very underwhelmed. You missed the pile of roses thrown on the stage to Mercury by supposed audience members. The whole thing was not my cup of tea.

  24. #2299
    ALL ACCESS Gruno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Watched the back half of Ferris Bueller's Day Off again. Still a fun movie, even with all the illogical stuff that happens in it (how the frell does a teenager con his parents into buying him a $7,000 sampler?!). "Oh, Mr. Rooney, you left your wallet on the kitchen floor!"
    Illogical?

    Sorry, for a second I thought you were serious in looking for logic in a movie like Ferris Bueller's Day Off.


    Next, you're going to try to tell me that this was movie magic or some trickery at 1:30


  25. #2300
    Having this argument with a friend. He says the cast of True Romance is better than the cast of How The West Was Won. He's wrong but he has recency bias and he also thinks he can beat a kangaroo in a fight so he's slightly delusional.

    In any case, that got me on to another argument we have had about the "best" movie of all time. I say, without hesitation, Citizen Kane. He differs, but that's not the point. Just a little history of why I'm posting this.

    He got me thinking so I pulled out a book you guys might really dig. No joke, it's called the Citizen Kane Book. It's a very detailed look at the making of the movie. W.R. Heast and his empire of propaganda, the studios, the bankers involved in the studios, etc. Crazy stuff surrounding this movie that I didn't fully realize 15 years ago when I read this book.

    I have only gotten about 15 pages in and am totally engrossed so much so that I installed a new light bulb with higher wattage so I can see what I'm reading. I haven't read in a while, it's kinda cool.

    My copy is a big hardback so it might be expensive. Written in 1971 by Pauline Kael(look her up, she knows her shit going back to the silent movie era) so it's out of date but still fascinating as all hell.

    So, there's that.
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