Thread: Movies - Take Two. Action!

  1. #626
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Buckeye Nation
    Posts
    1,575
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    2010: Maybe I was expecting too much from it, but it didn't come up to... the Kubrick movie...
    That says it all right there. lol
    I love sleeping. It's like being dead without the commitment.

  2. #627
    Don't let your meatloaf! Paulie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    434
    I loved The Rover. Thanks for the rec Klonky!
    "That gum you like is going to come back in style."

  3. #628
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    2010: Maybe I was expecting too much from it, but it didn't come up to either the Kubrick movie
    Well of course it didn't. I mean, that's like saying Toys In The Attic or Love Gun didn't come up to Let It Bleed or Revolver or something. Yet I own and enjoy all four records.

    Likewise I like 2010 for what it is: an attempt to carry the story line forward.

    And what movie based on a book is ever as good as the book itself?! Hell, even the paperback adaptation of Jaws 2 is better than the actual movie!

  4. #629
    Estimated Prophet notallwhowander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Coastal California
    Posts
    773
    Hey, did anyone besides me see The Death of Stalin this last spring?

    I mentioned it to a group of friends last night and no one even knew it was a thing.

    As you might imagine, it is a dark comedy. Really well done. Steve Buscemi just knocks it out of the park as Nikita Khurshchev.




    edit: messed up my tags
    Last edited by notallwhowander; 08-11-2018 at 07:08 PM.
    Wake up to find out that you are the eyes of the world.

  5. #630
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    5,540
    Oh yeah I watched it (The Death Of Stalin) it was brilliant, good performances all round & funny.
    Ian

    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  6. #631
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    La Florida
    Posts
    3,854
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post

    Likewise I like 2010 for what it is: an attempt to carry the story line forward.
    I liked that film too. It was an attempt at furthering the story along. It wasn't a bad science fiction film, imo.

  7. #632
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    9,655
    RE: Outland, the story made perfect sense to me. I don't recall anything at all confusing or unclear about it. Plus, it has a guy's head exploding, which is the mark of quality.

    RE: 2010, I too thought it was pretty good science fiction. I really liked the part where the probe is about discover live on wherever the hell that is. Tense. IMO the movie was more like reading a science fiction book than a lot of movies that had come out in a long while before that.

  8. #633
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    RE: Outland, the story made perfect sense to me. I don't recall anything at all confusing or unclear about it. Plus, it has a guy's head exploding, which is the mark of quality.

    RE: 2010, I too thought it was pretty good science fiction. I really liked the part where the probe is about discover live on wherever the hell that is. Tense. IMO the movie was more like reading a science fiction book than a lot of movies that had come out in a long while before that.

    Also a fan of Outland.

  9. #634
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Buckeye Nation
    Posts
    1,575
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    RE: 2010, I too thought it was pretty good science fiction. I really liked the part where the probe is about discover live on wherever the hell that is. Tense. IMO the movie was more like reading a science fiction book than a lot of movies that had come out in a long while before that.
    Agreed. And, I'd add, since.


    Edit: BTW, A.C. Clarke wasn't fond of explaining the monolith but the publisher (or studio) demanded it.
    I love sleeping. It's like being dead without the commitment.

  10. #635
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Plus, it has a guy's head exploding, which is the mark of quality.
    I'm sure you're being facetious, but someone's head exploding in a movie, due to a pressure change of one atmosphere, is more a mark of poor research. The rapid pressure change would have to be much greater than what happens when a human is exposed to a vacuum for them to explode (for instance the scenarios in The Patriot and License To Kill).

    Normally, I'm not one of those people who make a big deal about things like there being no sound in outer space (i.e. space ships don't make sounds as they "pass the camera" and exploding starships wouldn't make any sound either), but for some reason, that one issue (along with the trope of motor vehicles spontaneously exploding upon impact or seconds afterward) bugs me.

  11. #636
    Member Lou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Cincinnati-ish
    Posts
    1,322
    Death Note

    Caught this Netflix original tonight. Had it in my queue for ages, but kept holding back due to the cheesy still that accompanies it . I'm glad I finally
    watched it. Light (kid's name) is a typical high school outcast/nerd. During a pop up autumn storm, a book falls from the trees by his feet. It is
    called Death Note. There are many rules inside, but the gist is that the holder of the book can write the name of anyone in the book and list the
    type of death you want to happen to them. Then, it happens. An evil 8ft tall being appears (only to be seen by the holder) who looks like a large
    bundled assortment of tree limbs with colored eyes and bad teeth. ( the object of the Netflix still, and voiced by William Defoe) Fortunately, the evil treelike
    death god does not have extensive screen time. So, Light takes out a school bully, and the dude who killed his mother and got away with it. He confides
    in a school hottie, and together they start taking out criminals worldwide. it soon spirals out of hand. I was pleasantly surprised by this one. It was much
    better than I anticipated.
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  12. #637
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    9,655
    Quote Originally Posted by Lou View Post
    the holder of the book can write the name of anyone in the book and list the
    type of death you want to happen to them. Then, it happens.
    AKA "everyone's fantasy"

  13. #638
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Crimea River
    Posts
    6,281
    Watched a "documentary" tonight called Demon House. Supposed to document the goings on at a haunted house in Gary, Indiana (aren't they all?) No real attempts at scientific exploration are made, and anecdotes that don't support the narrative are not tracked down in detail. It's a hoot, and eventually, I found myself doubting the crew's account of the affects suffered. 2 out of 10 12 ft tall goat men.
    "If you want to see the true nature of humanity, just look at the internet."

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  14. #639
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    small town in ND
    Posts
    3,811
    Finally saw Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. Some great acting but wow, there's so many fucking problems with this movie I barely know where to begin. I'm not buying the redemption for either of those characters, the whole thing about the Chief of Police, some of the characters were barely one dimensional, the lack of resolution on a major part of the plot, and on and on. Thumbs down.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  15. #640
    ALL ACCESS Gruno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Dio, Alabama
    Posts
    1,701
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    RE: Outland, the story made perfect sense to me. I don't recall anything at all confusing or unclear about it. Plus, it has a guy's head exploding, which is the mark of quality.
    Quote Originally Posted by nycsteve View Post
    Also a fan of Outland.
    Add me to the list!

  16. #641
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Buckeye Nation
    Posts
    1,575
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    I'm sure you're being facetious, but someone's head exploding in a movie, due to a pressure change of one atmosphere, is more a mark of poor research. The rapid pressure change would have to be much greater than what happens when a human is exposed to a vacuum for them to explode (for instance the scenarios in The Patriot and License To Kill).
    The tropes in SF movies bug the shit out of me. Relevant to your comment, take a gander:

    You've gone and done it. You've found yourself "spaced": tossed out of the airlock of a capsule or space station without a spacesuit. Panicking, you desperately try to get yourself back to safety. How long do you have to find a source of both air and air pressure? Spoiler alert: not long. Twist ending: longer than you think.

    First off, you're not going to explode, and your blood's not going to boil. Just because there's zero pressure outside doesn't mean that your body suddenly loses all cohesion. You may have noticed a particularly useful organ that covers you from head to toe — you know, skin. It does a really great job of keeping your insides inside. It's a little bit elastic, but not much, and it's perfectly capable of preventing your guts from spilling out all over space. It also keeps your blood pressure high enough to stop your blood from boiling.

    But just because you won't explode doesn't mean you won't inflate. The nitrogen dissolved in your bloodstream near the surface of your skin will collect itself into little bubbles. These bubbles expand, puffing you out to around twice your size, starting at your hands and feet and moving in. It's a real thing: it's called ebullism. Sure, you'll look like the worst balloon animal ever, and you'll feel pretty miserable, but you won't be dead…at least not right away. Left unchecked, the inflated bubbles will cause significant tissue damage, but other things will kill you first.

    The temperature — or rather, the lack of temperature — won't get you right away, either. The reason you can get hypothermia so quickly from lukewarm water isn't the temperature of the water itself, it's that water is really, really good at conducting and convecting heat away from you. Any heat your body's metabolism produces gets sucked away. That's why scuba divers wear wetsuits: to trap a layer of water and prevent it from carrying away that precious body heat. In a vacuum, there's no convection — and no conduction, either. That only leaves radiation. Every human is glowing, in the infrared spectrum, from radiating heat at about 100 watts. Usually we don't notice all this lost energy: swaddled in an insulating layer of air, and warmed by the sun above our heads and the ground beneath our feet, our thermal output is more than matched by the thermal input of our environment. We can happily radiate all day long.

    In space there's nothing to insulate you, so eventually you'll freeze to death. But fortunately, that loss of 100 watts of heat isn't all that much compared to the sheer mass of your body. You ever notice how long it takes to boil a pan of water, or how long it takes for a pile of snow to melt? In the vacuum of space, you're not turning into a popsicle anytime soon.

    What ultimately dooms you is your body's own traitorous circulatory system. There's no air in space (it's kind of part of the definition), which means there's no oxygen. But your blood doesn't know that. It cycles past your lungs, ready to pick up another O2 hitchhiker, and keeps on going — with or without a passenger. Your heart keeps beating, and that oxygen-deprived blood goes wherever it's supposed to go. For example, your brain.

    Starved of oxygen, your think-box goes into shutdown mode to conserve energy. About 15 seconds after leaving the safety of the airlock, you lose consciousness. You're not a corpse yet, though. If some good (space) Samaritan pulls you back to safety within a minute or two, you'll be all right. Sort of. I mean, there's all the ebullism and flash-frozen skin. Oh, and a bonus nasty sunburn from all that raw unfiltered UV radiation. But that's survivable, if a bit uncomfortable.

    Unfortunately, if you're left in space past the 2-minute mark, all your other organs will have to shut down from the lack of oxygen too, which in medical circles is called "dead."

    And for Armstrong's sake, do not hold your breath. I'm no biologist, but I'm pretty sure that the valves and tubes that make up your throat were not meant to hold a lungful of atmospheric-pressure air against a pure vacuum. If you attempt to keep a big breath in, you'll experience the same thing that scuba divers do if they ascend too quickly from deep waters: ruptured lungs.

    Gross, I know, but nobody said spacing would be pretty.

    – Paul Sutter, PhD

    Normally, I'm not one of those people who make a big deal about things like there being no sound in outer space (i.e. space ships don't make sounds as they "pass the camera" and exploding starships wouldn't make any sound either), but for some reason, that one issue (along with the trope of motor vehicles spontaneously exploding upon impact or seconds afterward) bugs me.
    Granted, the "F" in SF does mean "fiction" but the "S" still means "science". When they get shit wrong, which they often do in shows & movies, it has a tendency to pull me out of the story. I still say one of the greatest taglines for a movie is, "In space no one can hear you scream," from Alien. And, yet, at the end we hear the alien scream in space after it's shot by Ripley.

    One of my biggest pet peeves is when a car hits another head on and yet it still manages to roll over. Makes me wonder if anyone in the movie industry has ever seen a video of a head-on collision.
    I love sleeping. It's like being dead without the commitment.

  17. #642
    Member nosebone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Stamford, Ct.
    Posts
    1,022
    OK, but you , the audience, had to hear the Alien die .

    That thing was a horrible nuisance for the past 90 minutes!

    You needed that as bad as the shark blowing up in Jaws.
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  18. #643
    Quote Originally Posted by nosebone View Post

    You needed that as bad as the shark blowing up in Jaws.
    Oh, geez, now you've brought up two things that bug me.

    1. "Man eating sharks". Sharks don't eat people. Yes, they do sometimes attack humans, but it's typically a case of mistaken identity. Sharks have poor eyesight, and underwater, they tend to mistake surfers, divers, and swimmers for their usual prey. Generally, a shark will take one bite out of a human, and quite literally spit him out. To the best of my knowledge, there are no reports of a person being devoured by a shark, as happens to virtually everyone attacked in any of the Jaws movies (including, but not limited to, the little boy in the first one, the two divers at the beginning of the second one, and Simon McCorkendale during the last act of the third one).

    2. "Using a scuba tank as an explosive device". I kinda already knew this, but they actually tested this on Mythbusters. Basically, nearly all attempts to breach a scuba tank, even at point blank range, failed to deliver a result. I think they figured out you have to hit the tank from the flat underside (note: not all scuba tanks have flat under sides), and even then, you have to use a much more powerful weapon than Roy Scheider used in that scene.

    Now, on the other hand, in Jaws 2, when the scuba instructor freaks when he sees the shark, and bolts for the surface, yeah, that really will cause an embolism.

    And as a side note to the Jaws franchise, I still say Jaws 3 stole it's ending from an Italian film called L'Ultimo Squalo, which in turn stole it's ending from another B-movie called Up From The Depths. Of course, virtually everything else in L'Ultimo Squalo was stolen from the first two Jaws movies.

  19. #644
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Oh, geez, now you've brought up two things that bug me.

    1. "Man eating sharks". Sharks don't eat people. Yes, they do sometimes attack humans, but it's typically a case of mistaken identity. Sharks have poor eyesight, and underwater, they tend to mistake surfers, divers, and swimmers for their usual prey. Generally, a shark will take one bite out of a human, and quite literally spit him out. To the best of my knowledge, there are no reports of a person being devoured by a shark, as happens to virtually everyone attacked in any of the Jaws movies (including, but not limited to, the little boy in the first one, the two divers at the beginning of the second one, and Simon McCorkendale during the last act of the third one).

    .
    Well, that's why they are called movies and not documentaries. Jaws probably wouldn't have been a huge hit if it was about a reef shark who happened to nip a few people in the bum requiring stitches.
    Last edited by DocProgger; 08-12-2018 at 09:36 PM.

  20. #645
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Buckeye Nation
    Posts
    1,575
    Quote Originally Posted by nosebone View Post
    OK, but you , the audience, had to hear the Alien die .
    No, I didn't.

    You know, there was another way to write that scene that didn't violate the laws of physics: as the alien approaches Ripley, she shoots him, he screams, and then she hits the button to open the door.
    I love sleeping. It's like being dead without the commitment.

  21. #646
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Eastern Sierra
    Posts
    1,268
    It doesn't bother me that movies put sound in space when it wouldn't really be there. But it does bother me that every car in every movie or TV show, makes a tire-spinning screech from a dead stop when slowly leaving a parking space at the curb.
    Can this be the swan song? The final elbow?

  22. #647
    Quote Originally Posted by DocProgger View Post
    Well, that's why they are called movies and not documentaries. Jaws probably wouldn't have been a huge hit if it was about a reef shark who happened to nip a few people in the bum requiring stitches.
    Which breed of shark is besides the point. Most shark attacks requiring significantly more than just stitches. A shark bites down on your leg, there's a good chance you're going to at the very least have trouble walking, if not requiring a prosthesis afterwards. Of course, that assumes you'll actually survive, which doesn't always happen.

    And you don't think the movie would have been just as effective if, say, the bodies turned up with big chunks taken out of them? Like say, if the body of the girl at the beginning of the first Jaws, let's her body washes up on shore, with half of her right leg missing? In Jaws 3, they manage to find one victim's body (or most of it), despite the fact that the shark is apparently big enough to swallow a whole man. You're going to tell me that's one of the reasons why Jaws 3 isn't as good as the first movie, huh?

  23. #648
    The Jaws great white was an aberration. Therefor acting aberrantly . Hence , different from most shark attacks. Most movies require a suspension of belief. There are different degrees depending on the movie. The genre that has exhausted me is the superhero glut of movies. I can only accept a flying guy that wears his underwear outside of his leotards so many times before I totally dismiss the genre . Im well past that point here. Sharks , still ok . As are many other stretches of reality needed to advance a story in an exciting manner . But underwear wearing on the outside is OUT.

  24. #649
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Which breed of shark is besides the point. Most shark attacks requiring significantly more than just stitches. A shark bites down on your leg, there's a good chance you're going to at the very least have trouble walking, if not requiring a prosthesis afterwards. Of course, that assumes you'll actually survive, which doesn't always happen.

    And you don't think the movie would have been just as effective if, say, the bodies turned up with big chunks taken out of them? Like say, if the body of the girl at the beginning of the first Jaws, let's her body washes up on shore, with half of her right leg missing? In Jaws 3, they manage to find one victim's body (or most of it), despite the fact that the shark is apparently big enough to swallow a whole man. You're going to tell me that's one of the reasons why Jaws 3 isn't as good as the first movie, huh?
    Well, you're kind of going from one extreme to the other re realism in shark movies. The fact that Jaws was a supposed Great White was important, because of the sheer size of the Great White vs something like a typical reef shark or a nurse shark or something, and as noted in the previous post, it was an aberration. And my memory is fuzzy on this, but I seem to recall that back in the 70s before or around when Jaws was made, there had been a rash of shark attacks in tourist areas. So it's more believable that a huge Great White could "eat a human" than your typical normal sized shark. My point was that as a movie, it's got to be more scary than simply getting bit by a shark to sell the "fear" and "terror" aspect, ie, see just about every 1950s sci fi movie made with radiation causing massive sized insects tearing up entire cities and eating people. Jaws was like those old 50s sci fi movies in that respect.

    As far as Jaws 3, I don't think I've ever seen it, as I lost interest in seeing Jaws movies after 2.

    And now I'm seeing ads for some new Giant Mega Shark movie coming(cgi of course), so my bet is this one will really "jump the shark".

  25. #650
    Member nosebone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Stamford, Ct.
    Posts
    1,022
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    No, I didn't.

    You know, there was another way to write that scene that didn't violate the laws of physics: as the alien approaches Ripley, she shoots him, he screams, and then she hits the button to open the door.
    You still get the scream
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •