Thread: Movies - Take Two. Action!

  1. #401
    Geriatric Anomaly progeezer's Avatar
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    Jane Krakowski is a regular cast member of Netflix's The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, a Tina Fey creation, as well as a regular panelist on the Match Game revival with Alec Baldwin.
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    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    Most Vonnegut films suck. The one exception I know of is Mother Night,

    Slaughterhouse Five was very good too.

  3. #403
    Quote Originally Posted by DocProgger View Post
    1) Sixteen Candles? What about Pretty in Pink? If I'm going to extensively quote from a Hughes pic, it would be Ferris Bueller.
    I actually saw Pretty In Pink in the theater, when it first came out, basically on the strength of the fact that it was named after a Psychedelic Furs song (which the band re-recorded for the movie), and because it had Molly Ringwald in it. But I never really liked that one as much as Ferris, Sixteen Candles, or National Lampoon's Vacation (which was written by Hughes).

    And it always bugged me that the studio forced Hughes to change the ending (that's why Andrew McCarthy's hair is completely different from the rest of the film, because they shot the school dance scene months later). Originally, Andi was so to choose Ducky, but that didn't go over well with test audiences. Apparently, people thought a good looking girl choosing a geek over a Tiger Beat refugee was "implausible" or whatever. And so goes my love/hate relationship with mainstream America.

    I did like the gag on Two And A Half Men, where Alan dressed up as Ducky (the joke, of course, being that Jon Cryer played both characters).

    That (the blonde cousin) is Jane Krakowski, who has been in a slew of TV shows and commercials over the years. Ally McBeal, 30 Rock. She is doing the Sonic commercials with the cute gal from The Office lately too.
    Geez, I never picked up on that, but you're right. I guess Vacation is like the one movie where I didn't scan the closing credits, huh?

    3) Just so its clear, the great Duck Dunn and Steve Cropper ARE THE REAL Blues Brothers. That is where the movie in essence got its name. Belushi and Aykroyd were doing basically a Sam and Dave act, and Dunn and Cropper were the musicians on those tracks (ie Soul Man). They were known for all that great work they were doing at Stax as you mentioned, ie white guys playing on some of the greatest soul/R&B and blues ever and with Booker T of course. Belushi and Aykroyd kind of stole their schtick, but they went along for the gag.
    I never realized that, but that does make sense. I wonder if Steve and Duck didn't put forth the idea themselves, or if they said to themselves "Well, a gig's a gig" and went along with it for the paycheck.

    Oh damn, another great line: when Murph says "I wish you guys would make up your minds, otherwise I have to call Mr. Rangsinghe and get our old gig back" and Cropper says, "You mean at the Armada Room?", like that's absolutely the last thing he wants to do, go back to playing hotel lounges and wedding gigs.

    Another bit of Blues Brothers trivia is that in the original band, Paul Shaffer was the keyboardist. He was the keyboardist in the original SNL house band, and I guess when Aykroyd and Belushi decided they wanted to do what we now know as The Blues Brothers, they asked Paul to put a band together for them. For decades, the story went around that Paul couldn't be in the movie for contractual reasons, but I believe on Wikipedia, it says that Paul actually got fired by Belushi, because Paul had accepted an offer to produce a record for Gilda Radner (who he had a thing for). Apparently, the Gilda record never came out, but Belushi felt The Blues Brothers should have taken priority, and was upset that Paul had gone off to do something else in the middle of them gearing up for the movie. So that's why Murph Dunne is playing the piano player and organist in the movie.

    As for Vonnegut, I think the only movie I've seen based on one of his books is Slaughterhouse Five, which I was "not bad". It's a lot better than you'd expect to be, or I would have expected it to be, since you'd have thought that book would have been unfilmable.

  4. #404
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheLoony View Post
    Love this stuff. One movie can be a helluva movie but the behind the scenes crapola is sometimes so much more crazy.
    Me too. Oftentimes the ‘story behind the story’ is the best part.

    “Hearts of Darkness” is a feature length making-of about the disastrous production of “Apocalypse Now.” “Burden Of Dreams” is about the incredible difficulties encountered making “Fitzcarraldo.” “Lost Soul” is about the unbelievable twists and turns making “The Island of Dr. Moreau.”

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    ...and speaking of behind the scenes stuff, I have yet to see 'Lost in La Mancha' about Terry Gilliam's 'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote'. Evidently the movie is now complete, but U.S. distribution is still a question mark, and there's even a follow-up BTS feature planned called 'He Dreamed of Giants'. What a long strange trip that whole thing must have been for Gilliam and all involved.
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  6. #406
    Quote Originally Posted by nycsteve View Post
    I disagree giving Romero the credit for zombie flicks. The Last Man On Earth with Vincent Price features zombies and predates NOTLD by 4 years.
    Except that Last Man on Earth, based on the novel I Am Legend by Richard Matheson (and the only one of the three adaptations to actually follow the plot reasonably well) isn't about zombies. It's about vampires.

    Yes, there's a fucking difference.
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  7. #407
    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    Shawn Of The Dead is a fantastic comedy horror movie. The director was Edgar Wright & co-written by Simon Pegg. Their other movie is Hot Fuzz which is even better, parody of an American Cop movie set in a 'peaceful' English country village. One of my favorite movies. Pegg has also done The Worlds End & Paul which work less well for me. Pegg is probably best known now as Scotty in the Star Trek movies and as Benji Dunn in Mission Impossible. Wright went on to write & direct Scott Pilgrim & Baby Driver.
    That's two of the "Cornetto Trilogy." The third is The End of the World, about a pub crawl that goes horribly wrong.
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  8. #408
    Quote Originally Posted by hippypants View Post
    Most Vonnegut films suck. The one exception I know of is Mother Night,

    Slaughterhouse Five was very good too.
    A way distant second best after MN. It's an OK adaptation, but not a very good movie, if you follow me.

    Am I the only person in the world to have seen Between Time and Timbuktu the one time it was broadcast on PBS? I'd pretty much kill for a copy of that brilliantly-incoherent masterpiece.

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  9. #409
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    That's two of the "Cornetto Trilogy." The third is The End of the World, about a pub crawl that goes horribly wrong.
    That's called The World's End that I mentioned in the post, Its the least of the trio for Wright-Pegg-Frost in my mind though its starting point of the pub crawl in your youth does really really resonate with me
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  10. #410
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Regarding Zombieland: as much as I love that movie, it doesn't pull off the horror nearly as effectively as An American Werewolf in London. Once the humor becomes obvious in ZL, the movie shifts in tone and, as Jed pointed out above (albeit for a different movie), it's more gory than scary. Altho, as a comedy, I think it works better. Whereas AAWiL is a horror movie first, with some great humor thrown in. And, I'd argue, in this case the humor makes the horror that much more effective. I mean, how fucked up is that scene in the movie theater when all the people who David had killed are offering suggestions on how he should kill himself? It's both comedy and horror that shifts into straight horror as David changes into a werewolf and starts killing everyone in the theater.

    You know, something about An American Werewolf in London that I've never seen mentioned is that underneath it all, there's real "heart" in it: David's grief over Jack's death; Jack genuinely sympathizing with David over his situation; and at the center of it all, a tragic love story. I mean, how can someone not feel sad for Alex after David's killed and she's standing all alone in the alley, crying? The movie works on so many levels.

    Regarding Shawn Of The Dead, I agree that it's a great comedy/horror movie but, like Zombieland, is a comedy first.

    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad
    Their other movie is Hot Fuzz which is even better, parody of an American Cop movie set in a 'peaceful' English country village.
    Agreed! Loved that movie. I thought it was even funnier than SotD.

    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    And yes, I do, apparently, have the ability to recite virtually every line of The Blues Brothers. There's a few other movies I can do that with too, like Student Bodies, The Party, Sixteen Candles and National Lampoon's Vacation
    Possibly my favorite line from any comedy ever:



    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Me too. Oftentimes the ‘story behind the story’ is the best part.
    The one they had on TV about Caddyshack was excellent.

    Quote Originally Posted by proggy_jazzer View Post
    ...and speaking of behind the scenes stuff, I have yet to see 'Lost in La Mancha' about Terry Gilliam's 'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote'.
    I thought that was a really good documentary. I also came away liking Terry Gilliam even more.

    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    That's called The World's End that I mentioned in the post, Its the least of the trio for Wright-Pegg-Frost in my mind...
    Agreed. I really looked forward to it because of the W-P-F combination but was disappointed. I think it was because Pegg was not really a protagonist. However, I did like that Nick Frost gradually became one in it, tho.
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  11. #411
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    I think I read somewhere that one could communicate with men of a certain age by just quotes from Caddyshack, Vacation, and the Godfather. "So I got that goin' for me, which is nice."
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  12. #412
    ALL ACCESS Gruno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    I think I read somewhere that one could communicate with men of a certain age by just quotes from Caddyshack, Vacation, and the Godfather. "So I got that goin' for me, which is nice."
    Hah, classic! I'm not too up on my Godfather quotes, but I can handle the rest just fine.

    When you all do the Monty Python quotes it loses me, as I am not a fan of the Python.

  13. #413
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Hal, I agree with you on the difference between SOTD/Zombieland and AAWiL is the humor first then horror whereas AAWiL is clearly horror first.
    Ian

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  14. #414
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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  15. #415
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    I mean, how fucked up is that scene in the movie theater when all the people who David had killed are offering suggestions on how he should kill himself?
    I love that scene. I love the bit where someone suggests David should hang himself, and Jack says something like "No, do it wrong and it could be...painful", and the guy he killed in the tube train station gets angry and says that David seem to care much about how painful his death was, etc. And then Jack's like "Do you mind?! This is a friend!". Then there's the line about shooting himself, and the suggestion that one might miss, and someone says something like "You won't miss if you put it in your mouth".

    I also love David waking up, after the first night as the werewolf, naked, in the zoo, and then stealing a woman's coat to cover up.

  16. #416
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gruno View Post
    Hah, classic! I'm not too up on my Godfather quotes, but I can handle the rest just fine.

    When you all do the Monty Python quotes it loses me, as I am not a fan of the Python.
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  17. #417
    ALL ACCESS Gruno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lou View Post
    Sacrilege!!! Now go away, or I shall taunt you a second time!

  18. #418
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gruno View Post
    From the Holy Grail
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  19. #419
    Progdog ThomasKDye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    You seriously don't remember any of that?!
    Oh, okay, three things came to mind:

    Jake glowing in the church from the "vision from God," because that was so weird.

    Jake and Elwood singing "Stand By Your Man" in the Country/Western bar. Don't know why. I guess I'm such a music nerd I tend to glom onto musicians going outside their comfort zone and doing something different.

    Yeah, okay, Henry Gibson, because I didn't expect him to show up playing a Nazi.

    I don't know. Just must not have been for me. I know friends who are huge fans of it, but I'm not really that into "blues," I didn't like the characters, and seeing John Lee Hooker or Aretha Franklin warrants a shrug from me. They're justifiably legendary and all that, but their music's not my cuppa pea soup.

    And then, you know.... how many damn car crashes were there, filling up time?
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  20. #420
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    I also love David waking up, after the first night as the werewolf, naked, in the zoo, and then stealing a woman's coat to cover up.
    I thought the best bit from that scene is him coaxing the kid over and then stealing his balloons.

    BTW, I rewatched the hospital scene when Jack shows up at breakfast. The line that got me laughing so hard was when Jack's trying to talk to David, who's totally freaked out, and Jack says, "David! You're hurting my feelings."

    You know, I was also reminded of the fact that Jack & David are Jewish and there's a subtle Jewish sense of humor there. That's probably why I find their banter so funny like when David wakes up in the middle of the night at Alex's flat and finds Jack in the bathroom and David says, "you're not real," and Jack says, "ah, don't be a putz, David."
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  21. #421
    All this talk about Belushi, Aykroyd, and goofy comedies of that era, and I don't think anyone has even mentioned the bizarre, off kilter and overlooked Neighbors. That may be Aykroyd's pinnacle!

  22. #422
    Quote Originally Posted by DocProgger View Post
    All this talk about Belushi, Aykroyd, and goofy comedies of that era, and I don't think anyone has even mentioned the bizarre, off kilter and overlooked Neighbors. That may be Aykroyd's pinnacle!
    I liked Neighbors way more than Blues Brothers. BB was only noteable for me in the cameos by musician legends. Other than that its one of the lesser Akkroyd/ Belushi efforts. IMO.

  23. #423
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    I thought the best bit from that scene is him coaxing the kid over and then stealing his balloons.

    BTW, I rewatched the hospital scene when Jack shows up at breakfast. The line that got me laughing so hard was when Jack's trying to talk to David, who's totally freaked out, and Jack says, "David! You're hurting my feelings."

    You know, I was also reminded of the fact that Jack & David are Jewish and there's a subtle Jewish sense of humor there. That's probably why I find their banter so funny like when David wakes up in the middle of the night at Alex's flat and finds Jack in the bathroom and David says, "you're not real," and Jack says, "ah, don't be a putz, David."
    That kid with the balloons is one of the worst actors ever. I know he was only a kid, but it seems like they just grabbed him off the street and gave him a couple of lines.

  24. #424
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DocProgger View Post
    All this talk about Belushi, Aykroyd, and goofy comedies of that era, and I don't think anyone has even mentioned the bizarre, off kilter and overlooked Neighbors. That may be Aykroyd's pinnacle!
    I remember when it was released. My friends and I loved it. Belushi was okay but it seemed weird him playing a straight role. Agreed about Aykroyd. He was perfect in it.

    I rewatched it a few years ago and felt it didn't hold up that well.
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  25. #425
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    I remember when it was released. My friends and I loved it. Belushi was okay but it seemed weird him playing a straight role. Agreed about Aykroyd. He was perfect in it.

    I rewatched it a few years ago and felt it didn't hold up that well.
    I saw Neighbours in the theater. It's hard to recall all the details from thirty years ago but there is a scene where Belushi's face is covered in a black substance or mud or something that I laughed so hard I was crying. It has to be one of the best belly laughs I have had at the movies. That five minutes was actually worth the price of admissions. For the rest, I can't remember the plot.

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