Thread: Movies - Take Two. Action!

  1. #3601
    Member Staun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    1,448
    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    I have not seen that for years, must checking out.

    Another favorite role of mine for Fonda is The China Syndrome. I dont think she gets enough recognition for that one.

    It was one of those rare occasions where an actor was utterly convincing in the profession, in this case TV journalism. It was a very committed and well researched role.

    The scene outside the power plant at the end is extraordinary...she really sells that moment.
    Yeah, that was good but I'd like to give Jack Lemmon some credit as well. A great actor.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  2. #3602
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    small town in ND
    Posts
    3,811
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    SWEET!

    This made me laugh out loud at least three times, which bodes well for the movie
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  3. #3603
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    9,947
    I posted on the brilliant In the Name of the Father earlier. Here's a trailer, not sure if anyone has seen it.

    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  4. #3604
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    southern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,862
    ^^^ In The Name Of The Father is an excellent film, with the always outstanding Daniel Day-Lewis and Emma Thompson, and the dearly departed Pete Postlethwaite, another fine actor. Haven't seen it in many years, I'd love to revisit it soon. I know that historical liberties were taken, but it's still worthy of all its acclaim. Nice to see a film of that calibre being discussed here.
    Prog, Metal and Classic rock reviews/interviews - www.velvetthunder.co.uk

  5. #3605
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    9,947
    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    ^^^ In The Name Of The Father is an excellent film, with the always outstanding Daniel Day-Lewis and Emma Thompson, and the dearly departed Pete Postlethwaite, another fine actor. Haven't seen it in many years, I'd love to revisit it soon. I know that historical liberties were taken, but it's still worthy of all its acclaim. Nice to see a film of that calibre being discussed here.
    ...and I'm glad to read you also see this as a seminal/important film. If you do revisit it, I can only say it was equally powerful after seeing it all these years ago. You're right, all the lead actors were extremely strong but Daniel Day Lewis blew me away! Stellar performance.
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  6. #3606
    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    ^^^ In The Name Of The Father is an excellent film, with the always outstanding Daniel Day-Lewis and Emma Thompson, and the dearly departed Pete Postlethwaite, another fine actor. Haven't seen it in many years, I'd love to revisit it soon. I know that historical liberties were taken, but it's still worthy of all its acclaim. Nice to see a film of that calibre being discussed here.
    I haven't seen it because I know I won't like it.

  7. #3607
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Everywhere with helicopter
    Posts
    105
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    ^^^ Somehow they always make me think of Linda Ronstadt...
    Speaking of:

    https://deadline.com/video/linda-ron...d-of-my-voice/

    Looking forward to seeing this. I've always been a huge fan.
    No matter how corrupt, greedy, and heartless our government, our corporations, our media, and our religious and charitable institutions may become, the music will still be wonderful. - Kurt Vonnegut

  8. #3608
    re: Jane Fonda

    OK, you guys can roll your eyes at me, and I know you will, but my favorite movies of her's are Barbarella (oh, like you really didn't see that coming) and 9 To 5. I love her fantasy scene in the latter, where she's a hunter stalking Dabney Coleman through the offices, finally shooting him, I believe, in the john, with the final shot of his head mounted on the wall behind her. Great scene! I also love the scene with the run amok Xerox machine.

  9. #3609
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    southern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,862
    Quote Originally Posted by nycsteve View Post
    I haven't seen it because I know I won't like it.
    Prog, Metal and Classic rock reviews/interviews - www.velvetthunder.co.uk

  10. #3610
    Member hippypants's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Tyler, Tx
    Posts
    780
    re: Jane Fonda

    For me it's Barbarella, Coming Home, The China Syndrome, On Golden Pond, probably more.

  11. #3611
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Buckeye Nation
    Posts
    1,575
    Jane Fonda was never an actress I was particularly drawn to, altho I do think she's good. My favorite movies that she appears in are Barefoot in the Park, Klute, Electric Horseman, and On Golden Pond.
    I love sleeping. It's like being dead without the commitment.

  12. #3612
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    9,947
    Is anyone watching the CNN Origianal Series, The Movies? I've missed them but wondering what others think. This week the're profiling the 1970s.
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  13. #3613
    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    Is anyone watching the CNN Origianal Series, The Movies? I've missed them but wondering what others think. This week the're profiling the 1970s.
    Its ok. Nothing amazing or insightful.

  14. #3614
    Member nosebone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Stamford, Ct.
    Posts
    1,022
    Just got back from Once Upon A Time In Hollywood (2019)

    Brilliant movie!

    The details to the period (1969) are so genuine and realistic, right down to Mannix being played on TV, acid soaked cigarettes for 50 cents and Squeaky Fromme at the Spahn ranch.

    You're also treated to a party at the playboy mansion with Steve McQueen and mama Cass, Bruce Lee training Sharon Tate in martial arts and Charlie Manson looking for Brian Wilson.


    Insane shenanigans!
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  15. #3615
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Crimea River
    Posts
    6,281
    ^ That one's on my watch list, and I'm not a huge Tarantino fan.
    "If you want to see the true nature of humanity, just look at the internet."

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  16. #3616
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kalamazoo Michigan
    Posts
    3,587
    Quote Originally Posted by nosebone View Post
    Just got back from Once Upon A Time In Hollywood (2019)

    Brilliant movie!

    The details to the period (1969) are so genuine and realistic, right down to Mannix being played on TV, acid soaked cigarettes for 50 cents and Squeaky Fromme at the Spahn ranch.

    You're also treated to a party at the playboy mansion with Steve McQueen and mama Cass, Bruce Lee training Sharon Tate in martial arts and Charlie Manson looking for Brian Wilson.


    Insane shenanigans!
    Hoping to see it next weekend.

  17. #3617
    I was gonna go see a documentary tonight at the Cleveland Institute of Art, a thing called Carmine Street Guitars. It's a film about a luthier who works out of a Greenwich Village shop. The trailer I saw last weekend had this luthier, plus a number of guitarists, notably Lenny Kaye, Charlie Sexton, and Bill Frisell. Looks like EXACTLY my kinda film, right? But it's too damn hot to go back outside, and I'm tired. I feel like a chump and I know I'm gonna regret this, but I just don't have the energy.

  18. #3618
    Well, as it turns out, I decided to go see Carmine Street Guitars, after all, and I'm glad I did. To clarify, the film is about Rick Kelly, a luthier who builds guitars from reclaimed wood salvaged from old buildings in NYC. Several people pop into the shop throughout the film. One guy, from a band called The Sadies (who also did the theme music) is shown playing a guitar made from chestnut wood, a species that Rick says died out about 150 years ago. Another guitar, with a body from a section of wood from McSorley's (the oldest bar in NYC), is played by Charlie Sexton, who betrays more jazz chops than I realized he had (though admittedly, I only know his 80's and 90's era solo albums and the Arc Angels record).

    Bill Frisell is an interesting case, because he talks about growing up in Denver and being into a surf rock band (from Denver?!) called The Astronauts. I say it's interesting, to me, because I only just recently got into The Astronauts (who I'd never heard of before a couple months ago) and in fact was listening to their album Go! Go! Go! this morning. Frisell is shown playing what I think might have been Surfer Girl, but I'm not sure.

    There was also a lady lap steel player, whose name I've forgotten now, unfortunately, who plays a beautiful solo piece on a vintage Gibson lap steel (I think, one of the ones made from leftover korina from when they originally discontinued the Flying V and Explorer back in 1960 or whenever it was).

    Turns out Rick built several guitars for Lou Reed, and Lou's guitar tech talks about how the guitars fell into his possession after Lou's death and he's continued to use them for the sort of drone concerts that Lou had been doing.

    The film also spends some time with Rick's apprentice, Cindy...damn, forget her last name, but anyway, she does her own guitar work, including doing things like burning designs into the bodies of guitars and so forth. At one point, she talks about that attitude she gets from some of the guys who come into the shop. Like if someone drops off a guitar, she'll ask what make and model it is, because you write these things down, and teh guy will say "Oh, it's a guitar", and she chuckles and says, "Uhm, I work in a guitar store, you can be more specific than that!". And she says there's guys who are astonished that she knows how to work on and build guitars (uhm, I guess these guys have never heard of Linda Manzer, huh?).

    I also love the bit of Rick's mother (who I gather is his office manager and general housekeeper) is shown, twice, trying to straighten an autographed picture of Bob Quine, which refuses to straighten out and she sort of gives up with the "to hell with it" expression.

    Also seen in the film is Kirk Douglas, the guitarist from the Roots, who shows us the Kelly guitar that he owns, and how there's this streak going from the pickup to the edge of the body, looking like a bolt of lightning. When he pulls the guitar out of the case, Rick says, 'Oh, who signed the back?" and Kirk says "Jeff Beck", and they show the autograph, and he says that "Yeah, Jeff held this guitar, I was worried he might not give it back" and it made me chuckle and think about the Prince incident.

    Oh and Nels Cline and Marc Ribot are in the film too.

    So if you dig guitars, and the people who build and play them, this is a film to check out for sure.

  19. #3619
    Just got home from seein Gthe Muppet Movie. I saw that movie, when I was 6 or 7, with my older brother Frank. I think it was the last movie we saw in Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, just before my dad retired after 21 years service in the Army.

    I think I actually liked it better this time than I did the first time. For one, I actually knew who all the people in the movie were this time. I mean, when you're six years old, in 1979, you don't know who someone like Edgar Bergen or Orson Welles is. You might not have even knonw who James Coburn, Mel Brooks, Madeline Kahn, Cloris Leachman, Paul Williams or especially Richard Pryor are. I'm not even sure I knew who Bob Hope was. So it was kinda cool to see the movie again, after all these years, and recognize all the cameos.

    Lots of corny jokes, Paul Williams songs, and such, but still very enjoyable. I'm glad I went, though I wish I had remembered the matinee showing this afternoon, because I could have saved myself $2.75 on admission. Oh well.

  20. #3620
    Member lak611's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    611
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Well, as it turns out, I decided to go see Carmine Street Guitars, after all, and I'm glad I did. To clarify, the film is about Rick Kelly, a luthier who builds guitars from reclaimed wood salvaged from old buildings in NYC. Several people pop into the shop throughout the film. One guy, from a band called The Sadies (who also did the theme music) is shown playing a guitar made from chestnut wood, a species that Rick says died out about 150 years ago. Another guitar, with a body from a section of wood from McSorley's (the oldest bar in NYC), is played by Charlie Sexton, who betrays more jazz chops than I realized he had (though admittedly, I only know his 80's and 90's era solo albums and the Arc Angels record).
    You're wrong. https://bucketlistbars.com/news-arti...-new-york-city

    1. The oldest bar in New York City is Fraunces Tavern. Located at 54 Pearl Street in New York City, this place is both a bar/restaurant and a museum, both honoring the tradition of taverns in New York City.
    Laura

  21. #3621
    Geriatric Anomaly progeezer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    11,249
    Quote Originally Posted by lak611 View Post
    You're wrong. https://bucketlistbars.com/news-arti...-new-york-city

    1. The oldest bar in New York City is Fraunces Tavern. Located at 54 Pearl Street in New York City, this place is both a bar/restaurant and a museum, both honoring the tradition of taverns in New York City.
    I don't think any of the founding fathers ever had a pint at McSorleys. Fraunces however....
    "My choice early in life was either to be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politician, and to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference"

    President Harry S. Truman

  22. #3622
    Quote Originally Posted by lak611 View Post
    You're wrong. https://bucketlistbars.com/news-arti...-new-york-city

    1. The oldest bar in New York City is Fraunces Tavern. Located at 54 Pearl Street in New York City, this place is both a bar/restaurant and a museum, both honoring the tradition of taverns in New York City.


    OK, then McSorley's is one of the oldest bars in NYC then. Take it up with Rick Kelly!

  23. #3623
    Member hippypants's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Tyler, Tx
    Posts
    780
    The Florida Project--a pretty sad and depressing movie about an unfit mother raising her child in sunlit Florida. That said I did find it watchable.

    Aquaman--on the other hand, I found this one unwatchable. Typical cliched superhero fair. Didn't finish it.

  24. #3624
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    southern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,862
    My most anticipated film this year! I cannot wait.

    Prog, Metal and Classic rock reviews/interviews - www.velvetthunder.co.uk

  25. #3625
    Quote Originally Posted by hippypants View Post
    Aquaman--on the other hand, I found this one unwatchable. Typical cliched superhero fair. Didn't finish it.
    I found nothing "typical" about Aquaman. It was like a brightly colored Saturday morning cartoon brought to life on the big screen.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •