Thread: Movies - Take Two. Action!

  1. #3351
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    Quote Originally Posted by proggy_jazzer View Post
    Fixed that for you ;-)

    Seriously, though, the story of the original four novels is deep enough to support a wealth of cinematic adaptations. There is no way a single motion picture can do justice to the whole. As I think I said before, with the rise of independent tv, I think the time is ripe for a multi-episode, multi-season tackling of the Dune universe. And with the advances in CGI, even God Emperor of Dune should be possible. I'm currently re-reading GEoD, and for some reason I keep flashing on what it would be like if James Spader played Leto II (face and voice, with CG worm-body, obviously). Only partly joking...
    I agree. Move the thing along, to reheat is a waste.
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    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    Well no, a reboot is not useless. If it sticks closer to the source material than Lynch’s movie did, it could set the stage for more movies in the Dune universe to follow.
    I have to think that if anyone saw the original film and the adaptations on TV, you've got a great idea of what's going on and what it's all about. For myself, we haven't moved an inch since that original.
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    Quote Originally Posted by proggy_jazzer View Post
    Fixed that for you ;-)

    Seriously, though, the story of the original four novels is deep enough to support a wealth of cinematic adaptations. There is no way a single motion picture can do justice to the whole. As I think I said before, with the rise of independent tv, I think the time is ripe for a multi-episode, multi-season tackling of the Dune universe. And with the advances in CGI, even God Emperor of Dune should be possible. I'm currently re-reading GEoD, and for some reason I keep flashing on what it would be like if James Spader played Leto II (face and voice, with CG worm-body, obviously). Only partly joking...
    I know what your saying, hoping I won't be cgi'd to death but I have a feeling this film is just asking for it. And since I know the story line, well......
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    Yes, The Killers, with Lee Marvin, is just a great film.
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  5. #3355
    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    I have to think that if anyone saw the original film and the adaptations on TV, you've got a great idea of what's going on and what it's all about. For myself, we haven't moved an inch since that original.
    For me, I would like to see a Dune movie that has a bigger budget and is able to establish a believable world. Lynch's movie was fine, but it often felt like a Lynch movie first and a Dune movie second, IMO. Not to mention the technological limitations back then. It also deviated from the book somewhat, so this is an opportunity to be more faithful to the source material.

    So no, I don't think it's useless at all.

  6. #3356
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    As for Mel Brooks, I understand you can sometimes grow out of things but funny is funny no matter what. "Cattle rapped, women stampeded".
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe F. View Post
    Thanks.
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  8. #3358
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    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    For me, I would like to see a Dune movie that has a bigger budget and is able to establish a believable world. Lynch's movie was fine, but it often felt like a Lynch movie first and a Dune movie second, IMO. Not to mention the technological limitations back then. It also deviated from the book somewhat, so this is an opportunity to be more faithful to the source material.

    So no, I don't think it's useless at all.
    I will agree with you that budget plays a major role in what can be done and what we finally see.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    At the time Cannon came on TV there seemed to be a new series every week involving a detective who had sone kind of quirk or something different about them. Columbo was the fastidious one with a curious nature, Barnaby Jones was basically a pensioner, Cannon was overweight, Ironside was in a wheelchair etc.

    I also find it odd that characters like Cannon and Barnaby Jones would effortlessly woo the leading lady every week and have a romance, and yet no one batted an eyelid back then.

    There was also another strange one called Faraday and Co, about a guy who had been lost in the jungle for 20 years or so, came back to the US and became a private eye...despite being unfamiliar with modern technology, cars etc. That was a bit of a stretch to say the least. Unsurprisingly I do not think it got further than the pilot episode.
    Mannix seemed to be a little free of gadgits
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  10. #3360
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    ...it was part of the NBC Mystery Movie rotation that particular season, so it alternated with Banacek and a couple other shows nobody remembers.
    We watched The Snoop Sisters, which we thought was really good. It was a mystery show but also had a lot of comedy in it. IIRC, they gave Helen Hayes all the best lines. I also remember a lot of those other shows quite well. Banacek, with George Peppard, Columbo, McMillan & Wife, Hec Ramsey (which only my dad liked), and McCloud (which was an adaption of Coogan's Bluff). The only ones we rarely missed, tho, were Banacek and McMillan & Wife. We grew tired of Columbo - because you always knew who was guilty of that episode's crime: the big name guest star - and McCloud, because my dad grew to really dislike Dennis Weaver. lol
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    Wasn't The Snoop Sisters the one that had the Alice Cooper guest spot performing "Sick Things," I think it was?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    We watched The Snoop Sisters, which we thought was really good. It was a mystery show but also had a lot of comedy in it. IIRC, they gave Helen Hayes all the best lines. I also remember a lot of those other shows quite well. Banacek, with George Peppard, Columbo, McMillan & Wife, Hec Ramsey (which only my dad liked), and McCloud (which was an adaption of Coogan's Bluff). The only ones we rarely missed, tho, were Banacek and McMillan & Wife. We grew tired of Columbo - because you always knew who was guilty of that episode's crime: the big name guest star - and McCloud, because my dad grew to really dislike Dennis Weaver. lol
    Seen all the reruns of Banacek and love it. I need the entire series. Great point about McCloud and Coogans Bluff.
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  13. #3363
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    ^^ I haven't seen Banacek since it first aired but I remember really liking it.

    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    Wasn't The Snoop Sisters the one that had the Alice Cooper guest spot performing "Sick Things," I think it was?
    I don't remember that but check this out:



    I wonder what Helen Hayes thought of that. lol
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  14. #3364
    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    Seen all the reruns of Banacek and love it. I need the entire series. Great point about McCloud and Coogans Bluff.
    I rewatched Banacek movies a few years back, they still hold up pretty well plot wise. I always remember the one about how they made a roomful of computers disappear.

    Ok, the implausibility of a guy like Banacek, an insurance investigator swanning around in a chauffeur driven limo, drinking and smoking cigars is hardly likely.

    Also...it had one of the best theme tunes (at least the original was before they started messing around with it).

  15. #3365
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    We watched The Snoop Sisters, which we thought was really good. It was a mystery show but also had a lot of comedy in it. IIRC, they gave Helen Hayes all the best lines. I also remember a lot of those other shows quite well. Banacek, with George Peppard, Columbo, McMillan & Wife, Hec Ramsey (which only my dad liked), and McCloud (which was an adaption of Coogan's Bluff). The only ones we rarely missed, tho, were Banacek and McMillan & Wife. We grew tired of Columbo - because you always knew who was guilty of that episode's crime: the big name guest star - and McCloud, because my dad grew to really dislike Dennis Weaver. lol
    But that was the whole point of Columbo. It was more of a whydunnit than a whodunnit...if that makes sense.

    The mystery was in how Columbo would look for clues as to how the murder happened, and follow them through so that he could prove his case and make the arrest.

    And it was that obstinacy, that tenacity of the character that was the appeal. And he also cleverly appeared to be a shambling, disheveled, forgetful guy who got on peoples nerves, but i always felt that he pretty much knew from the beginning that the person was guilty, he just had to find a way to prove it.

  16. #3366
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    I rewatched Banacek movies a few years back, they still hold up pretty well plot wise. I always remember the one about how they made a roomful of computers disappear.

    Ok, the implausibility of a guy like Banacek, an insurance investigator swanning around in a chauffeur driven limo, drinking and smoking cigars is hardly likely.

    Also...it had one of the best theme tunes (at least the original was before they started messing around with it).
    I remember that one to. I think they had the computers attached to the walls and simply moved the walls out. I also remember the horse disappearing. Who was the woman that was always trying to beat him to the punch?
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  17. #3367
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    But that was the whole point of Columbo. It was more of a whydunnit than a whodunnit...if that makes sense.

    The mystery was in how Columbo would look for clues as to how the murder happened, and follow them through so that he could prove his case and make the arrest.

    And it was that obstinacy, that tenacity of the character that was the appeal. And he also cleverly appeared to be a shambling, disheveled, forgetful guy who got on peoples nerves, but i always felt that he pretty much knew from the beginning that the person was guilty, he just had to find a way to prove it.
    Valid point. There was never any question who the murderer was, they showed you that in the beginning. The fun was in watching him prove it.
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  18. #3368
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    A Time To Kill (1996). A Southern lawyer (Matthew McConaughey) and his legal assistant (Sandra Bullock) defend a black man (Samuel L. Jackson) for killing his young daughter's white attackers. I saw this movie on its release and really thought it was an excellent film. I watched it again this week and could see all the limitations of the plot. It was actually still enjoyable but I'd rate it as an okay movie and not great.

  19. #3369
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    We watched The Snoop Sisters, which we thought was really good. It was a mystery show but also had a lot of comedy in it. IIRC, they gave Helen Hayes all the best lines. I also remember a lot of those other shows quite well. Banacek, with George Peppard, Columbo, McMillan & Wife, Hec Ramsey (which only my dad liked), and McCloud (which was an adaption of Coogan's Bluff). The only ones we rarely missed, tho, were Banacek and McMillan & Wife. We grew tired of Columbo - because you always knew who was guilty of that episode's crime: the big name guest star - and McCloud, because my dad grew to really dislike Dennis Weaver. lol
    Well, I'm a little younger, so I only saw any of this stuff in reruns, but I think Columbo, McCloud, and McMillan & Wife are the only ones I've seen. I remember seeing reruns of Columbo in the 80's, and in the 90's, A&E was showing a lot of "PI" shows, I remember them showing Banacek, McCloud, and a few others. They also aired The Rockford Files for awhile. Damn, the A&E channel used to be so cool, I remember they not only showed The Avengers, but they were apparently the first US broadcaster to ever show the ones with Honor Blackman episodes, I remember that was a big part of their PR when they first started showing it.

    Of course, geeks like us are gonna remember stuff most people aren't gonna remember. However, I bet if you walked up to the average person over the age of 50, they're probably not gonna remember something like The Snoop Sisters or Faraday & Company.

    I remember David Letterman had Leslie Nielsen on once. This was around the time of the Naked Gun movies, I think, and at one point, Nielsen is telling a story about being mistaken for George Peppard by someone in an elevator or something. I believe the way Nielsen told the story, he said the guy just sort of threw Banacek's catchphrase, whatever it was, I don't remember, and Leslie, not recognizing it,d idn't respond, then apparently the guy threw it at him like twice more, or something. So Dave laughs, explains that it's George Peppard the guy apparently mistook him for, and then says, "But who remembers Banacek?!"

    Mind you, with the advent of all these vintage TV channels reviving everything from The Roy Rogers Show to Police Woman, I imagine it's only time before someone decides to revive the entire Mystery Movie package, and before you know it, everyone's gonna be watching all those shows again.
    Mannix seemed to be a little free of gadgits
    I remember there was a point around 2000 when TV Land was showing Mannix. I remember watching it occasionally,b ut it was on at like 4:00 am and even though though I worked nights, at the time, I just didn't have the energy to stay most of the time to watch. I do remember an episode where the plot hinged a guy who was drowned by a couple scuba divers, while swimming in a marina.

    A three or so years ago, it was running on the H&I channel, and because I was working mornings a lot at the time, and I found myself arriving home from work many times to catch it. Good show. One episode had a scene where someone was throwing a cocktail party in what was very obviously the Brady Bunch living room! I believe it was Buffalo Springfield who appears in an episode, too.

    re: Alice Cooper on The Snoop Sisters,

    I wonder what Helen Hayes thought of that.
    I once saw an interview with Vince Furnier (that's his real name, ya know) where he said that he did a show at the LA Forum or wherever it was, where Groucho Marx and Mae West were in the front row! He said you had 20,000 people gasping in shock at everything he was doing onstage, and Groucho and Mae are down in front going, "Mmm, that's good vaudeville!" So maybe Helen Hayes saw it the same way, like some sort of really warped, but entertaining, burlesque show.

    Ok, the implausibility of a guy like Banacek, an insurance investigator swanning around in a chauffeur driven limo, drinking and smoking cigars is hardly likely.
    Something I never thought about, but I read that Paul Michael Glaser hated driving the red and white Grand Torino on Starsky And Hutch. He said it was big, ugly, and "childish looking", and on top of that, he thought he felt that undercover cops would never be seen driving in such a distinctive looking car. Apparently, he wasn't a fan of Ford automobiles to begin with.

    That got me thinking of other shows where people who theoretically should be trying to keep a low profile were seen driving conspicuously ostentatious vehicles. The other obvious example I thought of was Magnum P.I. I reckon a real private dick wouldn't drive around in a Ferrari because it makes him too easy to spot. You'd think that word would get around Hawaii that the guy in the Hawaiian shirt, driving around in a red Ferrari is a PI looking to stir up stuff, but apparently it never did. (shrug)

    Same thing with Knight Rider. If Michael Knight is supposed to be an undercover investigator, does it make sense that he'd be driving around in a customized Firebird? I mean, they could have built KITT to look like an AMC Gremlin or a Ford Fairmont or whatever.

    Hell, if they really wanted to keep a low profile, KITT could have been built to look like a Pinto! Then again, might still be conspicuous, wouldn't it, but for the exact opposite reason than the Firebird appearance.

    As for Columbo, apparently when it first began, there were network executives and the like who didn't believe in the show, because they didn't think anyone would watch a police procedural show where we find out who the murderer was a the beginning of the show.

    As for as "knowing" who the killer is, I went through a phase of watching Cold Case, which of course was a much later show, but there was a point where I figured out that in any given episode, the killer would turn out to be whoever it was you least wanted to be the killer. For instance, in one episode, a woman is strangled by her drug addicted, wheel chair bound, Vietnam vet brother. So after awhile, it became fairly easy to guess who the killer was. It would always turned out to be the victim's best friend, or a sibling, or parent, or fiancee or whatever. It was never the guy you wanted to be the killer, e.g. the sleazy discotheque owner, or the racist who didn't want Jewish people moving into his neighborhood. I guess that would have been even easier to guess, but they had a particular scheme for that show, and they never really seemed to vary away from it, which I think wasn't good. (shrug) Oh well.

  20. #3370
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    Does anyone remember the pilot episode for Columbo? He was so different. No rain coat, wasn't bumbling or forgetful. He had short hair, no humor about him, very serious. You wouldn't know it was the same show.
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  21. #3371
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    Just got a copy of The Twilight Zone hour episodes. They just don't run those but they are very very good.
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  22. #3372
    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    Does anyone remember the pilot episode for Columbo? He was so different. No rain coat, wasn't bumbling or forgetful. He had short hair, no humor about him, very serious. You wouldn't know it was the same show.
    If you mean the first movie, from 1968, yeah, I imagine they decided to retool things by the time the Mystery Movie deal started, which was, I believe, a couple years later.

  23. #3373
    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    Just got a copy of The Twilight Zone hour episodes. They just don't run those but they are very very good.
    Yeah, they do. The Twilight Zone was an hour long for only one season (out of, I believe, five), so that's probably why it seems like they don't come up as often, but SyFy does air them. They showed Of Late I Think Of Cliffordville just this morning. Good episode, with Julie Newmar as a demonic travel agent who sends Albert Salmi back to 1910 so he can re-experience the days of his youth, though things aren't quite as he remembers them being.

  24. #3374
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    I remember those Murder Mysteries, my family watched them all. Puberty had just kicked in so while my mother (who had zero gaydar) was swooning over Rock Hudson, I zeroed in on Susan Saint James and whatever woman Banacek was flirting with. If I recall correctly, Banacek had the best mysteries but it was fascinating watching Columbo work his way backwards to catch the murderer. McMillan and Wife was a little fluffier.

    I think another reason for the decline of Mel Brooks was the lack of great writing collaborators. He had Richard Prior for Blazing Saddles and Gene Wilder for Young Frankenstein. I would have to scroll through all the IMDB credits and I don't care to, but I don't recall him working with anyone of that caliber again.
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  25. #3375
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    ^^ I haven't seen Banacek since it first aired but I remember really liking it.


    I don't remember that but check this out:



    I wonder what Helen Hayes thought of that. lol
    That was it. I wasn't a regular watcher of the show, but it had been promoed heavily in advance, so it was appointment viewing. I thought he performed on a riser like in a Go-Go club, but I guess not.
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