Thread: Movies - Take Two. Action!

  1. #3076
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    Quote Originally Posted by nosebone View Post
    Anyone on this board a childhood fan of the 60s/70s comics?

    These MU movies capture that era perfectly.

    When your a kid, all that detailed stuff goes over your head , it doesn't matter, just fantasy.
    Lifetime comics fan/reader. Nowadays I buy more back issues than current issues, but there's plenty of great stuff being published currently.

    Re: your remark about "details," what defined the late Silver Age and Bronze Age stories (1970-1985) was that writers began to infuse more complex themes to reflect the changing American landscape. The largely one-dimensional characterizations and "Curses! Foiled again!" aesthetics that marked the Golden Age and early Silver Age stories were done away with. Stories became more layered, more elaborate. European comics were also influencing us. Over there, something like Druillet's Lone Sloane was standard stuff. Here, it was Holyshitwillyoulookatthat!

    If things hadn't changed, we'd have never gotten Jim Starlin's Infinity Gauntlet (more to it than the movie depicted), Denny O'Neil's notable heroin addiction arc in Green Lantern/Arrow, or especially the next level fare of Frank Miler's The Dark Knight Returns, still considered by many to be the ultimate Batman story.

    Batman Begins draws significantly from Miller's Batman: Year One, too. Nolan's entire trilogy wouldn't be possible without the stories Miller and Chuck Dixon wrote.

    Yeah, it's just fantasy but it's not just fantasy, if that makes sense.

  2. #3077
    Member Since: 3/27/2002 MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER's Avatar
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    anyone else notice the glaring anachronism in Endgame when they encountered 70s Pim?
    Why is it whenever someone mentions an artist that was clearly progressive (yet not the Symph weenie definition of Prog) do certain people feel compelled to snort "thats not Prog" like a whiny 5th grader?

  3. #3078
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    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    Read Marvel and DC. Loved Marvel because for one reason, their illustrations were so much better. Great drawings. Big FF4 fan. Even got into some of the independents.
    You did not go there. Don't open that box.

  4. #3079
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    Quote Originally Posted by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER View Post
    anyone else notice the glaring anachronism in Endgame when they encountered 70s Pim?
    Was there a CD boombox in the scene?

    There are quite a few time travel-hinged goofs in the movie, but the one that bugged me more than any other (besides Pierce and Cap "meeting" in 2012) was the sudden hive mind aspect of the two Nebulas in 2014. Just because the other Nebula showed up doesn't mean the one onboard Sanctuary II would automatically download hers. Without that nugget, the plan falls apart. And the outcome of 2018 happens, anyway.

  5. #3080
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    You did not go there. Don't open that box.
    I don't care, the Marvel machines were the greatest.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  6. #3081
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    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    I don't care, the Marvel machines were the greatest.
    Apparently you have forgotten they shared many of the same artists. A smattering of those who drew for DC in the '70s and '80s:

    Berni Wrightson (my fave artist, Numero Uno, A-#1)
    Jack Kirby ('nuff said)
    Joe Kubert (ditto)
    Neal Adams (double ditto!)
    John Byrne (there's the triple!)
    George Pérez (good at Marvel, became a phenom at DC)
    José Luis Garcia-Lopez (one of the best guys ever)
    Gil Kane (ditto)
    Dick Giordano (ditto again)
    Jim Aparo (still the best Batman artist, worked mainly for DC)
    Paul Gulacy
    Denys Cowan
    Alex Toth
    Keith Giffen

    Oh, yeah, some guy called Frank Miller.
    Last edited by dropforge; 05-08-2019 at 03:26 PM.

  7. #3082
    ALL ACCESS Gruno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    Apparently you have forgotten they shared many of the same artists. A smattering of those who drew for DC in the '70s and '80s:


    George Pérez (good at Marvel, became a phenom at DC)
    One of my favorite comic series ever was the 50-issue Vigilante.

  8. #3083
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    Was there a CD boombox in the scene?
    it was the blow dried feathered hairstyle from 1979 that they put on Pim of 1970
    If ya wanna know what normal men's hair looked like in 1970, look no further than RFK. The blow dryer and feathering did not come until years later... but I guess it was a laugh point in the movie for the Millennials who weren't there and have no clue
    Why is it whenever someone mentions an artist that was clearly progressive (yet not the Symph weenie definition of Prog) do certain people feel compelled to snort "thats not Prog" like a whiny 5th grader?

  9. #3084
    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    There are quite a few time travel-hinged goofs in the movie, but the one that bugged me more than any other [...] was the sudden hive mind aspect of the two Nebulas in 2014. Just because the other Nebula showed up doesn't mean the one onboard Sanctuary II would automatically download hers. Without that nugget, the plan falls apart. And the outcome of 2018 happens, anyway.
    Is that really a "goof" though? I saw that more as a form of entanglement than a hive mind; an unexpected consequence of messing around with the universe, and something that the heroes couldn't have planned for. We are talking about quantum mechanics, after all -- and who knows what happens when you travel through the quantum realm. Anyway, that part didn't bother me at all. Nebula is not exactly "normal" either, with all the modifications that were done to her. If it happened in a comic book it wouldn't feel out of place to me there either.

  10. #3085
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    Apparently you have forgotten they shared many of the same artists. A smattering of those who drew for DC in the '70s and '80s:

    Berni Wrightson (my fave artist, Numero Uno, A-#1)
    Jack Kirby ('nuff said)
    Joe Kubert (ditto)
    Neal Adams (double ditto!)
    John Byrne (there's the triple!)
    George Pérez (good at Marvel, became a phenom at DC)
    José Luis Garcia-Lopez (one of the best guys ever)
    Dick Giordano (ditto again)
    Jim Aparo (still the best Batman artist, worked mainly for DC)
    Paul Gulacy
    Denys Cowan
    Alex Toth
    Keith Giffen

    Oh, yeah, some guy called Frank Miller.
    True! I read Marvel Comics The Untold Story by Sean Howe last year.

    Marvel and DC artists were constantly going back and forth.
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  11. #3086
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gruno View Post
    One of my favorite comic series ever was the 50-issue Vigilante.
    FAN right here! I loved it. Marv Wolfman wrote it. He's easily one of my fave writers.

  12. #3087
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    Quote Originally Posted by nosebone View Post
    True! I read Marvel Comics The Untold Story by Sean Howe last year.

    Marvel and DC artists were constantly going back and forth.
    Like Howard Chaykin, who drew the first six issues of Star Wars.

    Funny stuff: Roy Thomas had to talk Stan Lee into publishing the official Star Wars ongoing title.

    It ended up pulling Marvel out of the red and saving the company's ass. After the first half-dozen issues (which cover the '77 movie), they had to renegotiate and Stan was dismayed to see their per-book royalty were going to go way down. But they couldn't stop publishing it. It was selling 100K+ copies a month.

    More funny stuff: I have it on good authority that Chaykin actually hates Star Wars.

  13. #3088
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post

    More funny stuff: I have it on good authority that Chaykin actually hates Star Wars.
    Me too
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  14. #3089
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    Apparently you have forgotten they shared many of the same artists. A smattering of those who drew for DC in the '70s and '80s:

    Berni Wrightson (my fave artist, Numero Uno, A-#1)
    Jack Kirby ('nuff said)
    Joe Kubert (ditto)
    Neal Adams (double ditto!)
    John Byrne (there's the triple!)
    George Pérez (good at Marvel, became a phenom at DC)
    José Luis Garcia-Lopez (one of the best guys ever)
    Dick Giordano (ditto again)
    Jim Aparo (still the best Batman artist, worked mainly for DC)
    Paul Gulacy
    Denys Cowan
    Alex Toth
    Keith Giffen

    Oh, yeah, some guy called Frank Miller.
    Your right of course Dropforge but the Marvel world looked more ambitious from an illustration standpoint. DC looked clean and neat. Not a lot to consider at what you were seeing. The Marvel blocs seemed to have a lot going on, a lot to see and take in. Maybe the philosophy between the two camps was different even though they shared the same artists at times.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  15. #3090
    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    Lifetime comics fan/reader. Nowadays I buy more back issues than current issues, but there's plenty of great stuff being published currently.

    Re: your remark about "details," what defined the late Silver Age and Bronze Age stories (1970-1985) was that writers began to infuse more complex themes to reflect the changing American landscape. The largely one-dimensional characterizations and "Curses! Foiled again!" aesthetics that marked the Golden Age and early Silver Age stories were done away with. Stories became more layered, more elaborate. European comics were also influencing us. Over there, something like Druillet's Lone Sloane was standard stuff. Here, it was Holyshitwillyoulookatthat!

    If things hadn't changed, we'd have never gotten Jim Starlin's Infinity Gauntlet (more to it than the movie depicted), Denny O'Neil's notable heroin addiction arc in Green Lantern/Arrow, or especially the next level fare of Frank Miler's The Dark Knight Returns, still considered by many to be the ultimate Batman story.

    Batman Begins draws significantly from Miller's Batman: Year One, too. Nolan's entire trilogy wouldn't be possible without the stories Miller and Chuck Dixon wrote.

    Yeah, it's just fantasy but it's not just fantasy, if that makes sense.
    I read a lot of the classic Marvel and DC stuff growing up in the 60s. I always liked origin stories the best.

    In the 80s I got back into it a little and discovered a lot of the classic stuff like Watchmen, Killing Joke, The Dark Knight and Batman Year Zero.

    I also got into movie tie in stuff, as Dark Horse comics picked up licenses for the Alien series, Predator, Robocop and Terminator. Probably the best of these is Aliens Book One, which was done in black and white and was an incredible story. Later they went colour, brought Ripley back etc. The artwork was stunning but the stories were not as good. There were many crossovers, such as Robocop v Terminator, Aliens v Predator etc. Only mildly successful.

    Related to that, I just picked up Transperceniege, the graphic novel that inspired the movie Snowpiercer. A very interesting read, and a great movie. Apparently a TV series is in production...look forward to that.

  16. #3091
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    I remember reading the Dark Knight and getting to the first scene that really separated this Batman from the 60s. An armed bank robber is moving down a stairwell in the dark. Batman waits below. He thinks to himself "There are seven working defenses from this position. Three of them disarm with minimal contact. Three kill. The other..." crunch "...hurts."
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  17. #3092
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    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    Your right of course Dropforge but the Marvel world looked more ambitious from an illustration standpoint. DC looked clean and neat. Not a lot to consider at what you were seeing. The Marvel blocs seemed to have a lot going on, a lot to see and take in. Maybe the philosophy between the two camps was different even though they shared the same artists at times.
    Are you sure you read anything by DC?

  18. #3093
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    Are you sure you read anything by DC?
    Yep, Superman, Batman, The Flash, Marvel just looked more adult to me. I really enjoy getting online and reading the copies from the Golden Age. Good stuff.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  19. #3094
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    I read a lot of the classic Marvel and DC stuff growing up in the 60s. I always liked origin stories the best.

    In the 80s I got back into it a little and discovered a lot of the classic stuff like Watchmen, Killing Joke, The Dark Knight and Batman Year Zero.
    Some of the best of the '80s right there. Brian Bolland (The Killing Joke) was one of the Judge Dredd/2000 A.D. artists. He first caught my eye with DC's inaugural original (non-superhero) "maxi-series" Camelot 3000. In fact, I'd better add him to the list above. Can't believe I forgot him for a sec.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    I also got into movie tie in stuff, as Dark Horse comics picked up licenses for the Alien series, Predator, Robocop and Terminator. Probably the best of these is Aliens Book One, which was done in black and white and was an incredible story. Later they went colour, brought Ripley back etc. The artwork was stunning but the stories were not as good. There were many crossovers, such as Robocop v Terminator, Aliens v Predator etc. Only mildly successful.

    Related to that, I just picked up Transperceniege, the graphic novel that inspired the movie Snowpiercer. A very interesting read, and a great movie. Apparently a TV series is in production...look forward to that.
    Killer movie. Speaking of Chris Evans, who's known as Captain America, he's been in quite a few films featuring comicbook properties: both Fantastic Four movies directed by Tim Story, the 2007 TMNT movie (as Casey), and DC's The Losers and Push — plus the aforementioned Snowpiercer.

  20. #3095
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    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    Yep, Superman, Batman, The Flash, Marvel just looked more adult to me. I really enjoy getting online and reading the copies from the Golden Age. Good stuff.
    Okay, you're talking pre-1970, obviously. I don't see how anyone can look at Wrightson or Kane and go "That's not's 'adult' enough for me."

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  23. #3098
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    I was never a comic fan altho I would occasionally read my brother's. One he used to get for a while was Metal Men. Anyone remember that one?

    He also had the issue where Superman & Flash had a race around the world to see who was faster. Anyone ever read it? If not, any guesses as to who won?
    I love sleeping. It's like being dead without the commitment.

  24. #3099
    I was never really into comic books. I remember reading some of the Star Wars comics, particularly the ones that followed The Empire Strikes Back story arc.

    I think after that, we were at some store somewhere, like a discount type place, and they had a package of like three or four Star Wars comics they were selling, I dunno if that was something Marvel did, or if it was that particular store (or the chain) trying to get rid of old stock that they couldn't return for credit or whatever. I recall one of them had a story line that revolved around our heroes on a planet that was the literal inverse of Tattoonie, i.e. an entire planet submerged u/w. As I recall, there was a riff about how Luke was uncomfortable, having been raised on a desert planet to find himself on such a planet.

    Beyond that, various old comics passed through my hands, but none of them were in collector shape, and I'm not sure how valuable any of them would have been if they had been. They mostly in the horror/suspense kind of genre. As I recall, there was a Twilight Zone comic book, which had something like three or four stories, each introduced by Serling (or at least an avatar we were supposed to believe was Serling).

    Another I remember had a story that revolved around Hitler having himself frozen, to be revived 10,000 years in the future, at which point, so his scientists tell him, history will repeat itself. He assumes he'll be able to take his place as fuhrer at the appointed time, only to find himself confronted by a doppelganger who proceeds to re-enact the opening panels of the story, wherein Hitler kills a man found in the passages of his bunker, only this time it's Hitler being summarily executed by the Future Hitler.

    But my cousin Jimmy was way into comics. He had like every issue of X-Men, in those little protective baggies, mounted on the walls in his room. he had a big sort of framed painting (well, a print, anyway) showing the then current X-men, standing in front of a picture of the first gen X-men or something like that.

    I recall about 10 years ago, he told me he finally sold the whole thing in one big lot, on E-bay. I forget what he said he got for them, but I'm sure it was a lot (pun semi-intended), to say the least!

    Last time I talked to him about comic books (I haven't seen him in about 7 or 8 years old), but he complained that it's gotten to where there's so many crossovers that you have to buy every issue of everything Marvel puts out, or DC or whatever, to follow what's going on. He said, "They don't know how to write comics anymore". Well, actually they do, but they're doing that to make you part with more of your hard earned money, much like record companies that keep putting out remastered, deluxe edition, legacy edition, super deluxe mega legacy edition boxsets, etc.

  25. #3100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    I was never a comic fan altho I would occasionally read my brother's. One he used to get for a while was Metal Men. Anyone remember that one?

    He also had the issue where Superman & Flash had a race around the world to see who was faster. Anyone ever read it? If not, any guesses as to who won?
    Flash.

    The Metal Men are cool.

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