Thread: Movies - Take Two. Action!

  1. #2576
    Quote Originally Posted by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER View Post
    they actually dared to remake a Hitchcock film?!
    Actually several of Hitchcock's movies have been remade. Didn't you ever see Throw Mama From The Train?

    (Seriously, Throw Mama From The Train is basically a remake of Strangers On A Train, played for laughs, they even acknowledge it in the picture itself, when Danny DeVito sets the main plot of the picture in motion by going to see the Hitchcock picture at a revival theater)

    Then there's Body Double, which is essentially a mashup of Rear Window and Vertigo, with a couple extra bells and whistles thrown in (e.g. a bit of nudity, a bit of Frankie Goes To Hollywood, etc).

    Those are just the two I can think off the top of my head. Lots of movies raid cinematic past to such an extent, they may as well be called remakes of whichever classic picture they're appropriating material from.

    In the case of Psycho, Gus Van Zandt didn't just do a remake, he did a virtual shot-by-shot recreation of the entire movie, including the infamous shower sequence. I've never actually seen, except for the appearance of the shower scene in a documentary program on cinema that TCM aired, where they contrasted the differences between the original shower scene and what Van Zandt added.

  2. #2577
    As for Steve McQueen, I have to admit, I've only seen a few of his movies. I know I read he hated being reminded about The Blob, but I've always thought that was a good "creature feature". I've seen The Towering Inferno a couple times over the years.

    The other one I remember seeing is The Hunter, which I believe was McQueen's last picture. I must have seen it on TV back in the 80's, because that was the first place I remember seeing the Marina City building, which I then recognized in other movies and TV shows (and when I finally visited Chicago myself). Maybe not the best picture McQueen ever made, but I recall it's still very entertaining.

    I've been wanting to see more of his films, particularly The Great Escape (I actually saw the back half years ago, but never beginning) and Le Mans, but I always seem to miss them when they're on TV.

  3. #2578
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER View Post
    wow... Hollywood just can not come up with anything of value nowadays
    I didn't know Papillon was remade either. And the remake is a couple years old already.

  4. #2579
    Quote Originally Posted by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER View Post
    they actually dared to remake a Hitchcock film?!

    the hubris of this new Hollywood knows no bounds
    Why hubris?

    Remakes are a fact of life. Movies are the property of the studio. You may not like the idea of a remake but you can't stop them being made. They will always happen. Always have. Always will. Petitions?Protests? Nah. Means nothing.

    Bottom line is, you object to a remake of a movie you like? Simple. Dont watch it. Life goes on, and the original movie is still the same and can be enjoyed for as long as you want.

  5. #2580
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    As for Steve McQueen, I have to admit, I've only seen a few of his movies. I know I read he hated being reminded about The Blob, but I've always thought that was a good "creature feature". I've seen The Towering Inferno a couple times over the years.

    The other one I remember seeing is The Hunter, which I believe was McQueen's last picture. I must have seen it on TV back in the 80's, because that was the first place I remember seeing the Marina City building, which I then recognized in other movies and TV shows (and when I finally visited Chicago myself). Maybe not the best picture McQueen ever made, but I recall it's still very entertaining.

    I've been wanting to see more of his films, particularly The Great Escape (I actually saw the back half years ago, but never beginning) and Le Mans, but I always seem to miss them when they're on TV.
    I would have to cite The Getaway as the ultimate McQueen movie for me.

    Not so much that it's his best acting performance, more that it's just him as the ultimate cool dude.

    Everything about his on screen persona, the way he looks, moves, talks. It just screams...cool.

    And I also have a fondness for The Hunter. Not his best and perhaps not a fitting epitaph, but it looked like he at least had fun making it.

  6. #2581
    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post

    Remakes are a fact of life. Movies are the property of the studio. You may not like the idea of a remake but you can't stop them being made. They will always happen. Always have. Always will. Petitions?Protests? Nah. Means nothing.

    Bottom line is, you object to a remake of a movie you like? Simple. Dont watch it. Life goes on, and the original movie is still the same and can be enjoyed for as long as you want.
    Truth is, remakes have always been a major facet of cinema. Look at how many times A Star Is Born has been remade. The classic version Universal version of Frankenstein (with Boris Karloff as the monster) is actually the second film adaption of Mary Shelley's book. Likewise, the Bela Lugosi version of Dracula is at least he second film version of the Bram Stoker book (counting Nosferatu, of course). And there are those who insist that the Hammer House versions of the Frankenstein and Dracula franchises are perhaps the "definitive" versions (I know I prefer Christopher Lee's version of Dracula over Lugosi).


    The Charlton Heston version of The Ten Commandments is at least the second cinematic version of the Old Testament story, and there's been how many different movies based the life of Jesus Christ? At least five that I can think of, off the top of my head.

    And then you've got people who insist on putting new spins on classic stories, e.g. updating Shakespeare to a more or less "modern" setting. Or they take it further, like with Strange Brew, one of my favorite comedies, which is basically Shakespeare, updating to early 80's Ontario, told from the point of Rosencrantz and Guldenstern, and played for laughs. And Scotland, Arizona, is basically MacBeth, set in early 70's Arizona.

    Then you've got The Magnificent Seven and Battle Beyond The Stars, both of which are adapted from Seven Samurai. There's a lot of other instances where some Hollywood studio decided to do an "Americanized" version of a classic picture, too, e.g. The Birdcage is based on La Cage Aux Folles, a late 70's French picture.

    If you didn't do remakes, you'd have to throw out a lot of movies that I, for one, think are very enjoyable. I'd not like to live in a world that didn't have Peter Cushing as Baron Frankenstein, Strange Brew, Battle Beyond The Stars, etc in it.

    The problem these days is, no one seems to remember how to do anything interesting with their remakes. Awhile back, Get Carter was mentioned. The Sylvester Stallone version is alright, but I don't think anyone in their right mind would say it was better than the Michael Caine version. It's just sort of there, for no other reason than to fill a gap in Sylvester Stallone's career, while he waited for someone to let him revive the Rocky and Rambo franchises.

  7. #2582
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    I would have to cite The Getaway as the ultimate McQueen movie for me.

    Not so much that it's his best acting performance, more that it's just him as the ultimate cool dude.

    Everything about his on screen persona, the way he looks, moves, talks. It just screams...cool.

    And I also have a fondness for The Hunter. Not his best and perhaps not a fitting epitaph, but it looked like he at least had fun making it.

    Agreed about the Getaway.

    That's probably the coolest performance of all time by anybody!

    Having Sam Peckinpah direct helped also.

    I re watched the remake last year starring Alec Baldwin and Kim Bassinger and it doesn
    t hold a candle to the original.

    Baldwin is such a pussy as Doc.
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  8. #2583
    Galaxy Quest. Came across this a few days ago, even funnier than it was BITD with the Monte Cristo joke. It took me a quarter of a century before I said dammit I want one of those so I looked it up and found one nearby. Killer breakfast place, I might add. They make their own jams and they are awesome.

    Anyway, the movie is really well casted but I'm kinda fond of Alan Rickman and pretty much anything he does is awesome. One word, Dogma.
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  9. #2584
    Quote Originally Posted by TheLoony View Post
    Galaxy Quest. Came across this a few days ago, even funnier than it was BITD with the Monte Cristo joke. It took me a quarter of a century before I said dammit I want one of those so I looked it up and found one nearby. Killer breakfast place, I might add. They make their own jams and they are awesome.

    Anyway, the movie is really well casted but I'm kinda fond of Alan Rickman and pretty much anything he does is awesome. One word, Dogma.
    Yeah, that was a good movie. I seem to recall there's some sort of homage to Roger Dean in one shot, but it must have been one of those "blink and you miss it" things, and I blinked, so...

    There was a good pseudo-documentary on Galaxy Quest that was produced at the time the movie was made, I guess as a promo tool. As I recall, it aired as an E! True Hollywood Story, set in the fiction of the movie, basically detailing the history of the Galaxy Quest TV series, what happened to the actors after the series got cancelled, etc. Alan Rickman is great, as he's being interviewed, again, in character as the pretentious English stage actor who can't get over how his career was ruined by the TV show. There's this great moment where he mentions auditioning for Galaxy Quest, and the way he says the title of the show is great, like it hurts him to even think about it.

    Given that Alan Rickman had a good deal of experience as a stage actor (as all British actors apparently do), I wonder if he ever worked with any actors like Alexander Dane, ya know, someone who agreed to do something like Galaxy Quest, which ends up dwarfing everything else the actor does, and they end up resenting that they're associated with some tacky TV series, rather than with Shakespeare or whatever.

    Oh, and the other thing about Galaxy Quest is, I can remember watching it and thinking, did Sigourney Weaver always have that cleavage or what? I mean, I've not seen most of her movies (actually, come to think of it, I think I've only seen the Alien pictures and Ghostbusters), but I don't ever remember her bosom ever looking like that before Galaxy Quest. Or was that her costume making her looking like that?

  10. #2585
    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    And I also have a fondness for The Hunter. Not his best and perhaps not a fitting epitaph, but it looked like he at least had fun making it.
    Given how much he was into fast cars, racing, and such in real life, one imagines you're probably right about him having fun while making The Hunter. I wonder how much of the driving stuff you see in movies like that or Bullitt was actually him, and how much was a stunt driver.

  11. #2586
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Yeah, that was a good movie. I seem to recall there's some sort of homage to Roger Dean in one shot, but it must have been one of those "blink and you miss it" things, and I blinked, so...

    There was a good pseudo-documentary on Galaxy Quest that was produced at the time the movie was made, I guess as a promo tool. As I recall, it aired as an E! True Hollywood Story, set in the fiction of the movie, basically detailing the history of the Galaxy Quest TV series, what happened to the actors after the series got cancelled, etc. Alan Rickman is great, as he's being interviewed, again, in character as the pretentious English stage actor who can't get over how his career was ruined by the TV show. There's this great moment where he mentions auditioning for Galaxy Quest, and the way he says the title of the show is great, like it hurts him to even think about it.

    Given that Alan Rickman had a good deal of experience as a stage actor (as all British actors apparently do), I wonder if he ever worked with any actors like Alexander Dane, ya know, someone who agreed to do something like Galaxy Quest, which ends up dwarfing everything else the actor does, and they end up resenting that they're associated with some tacky TV series, rather than with Shakespeare or whatever.
    Yeah, Galaxy Quest was great. I should watch that again, it has been years and years since I saw it. It's actually a bit deeper of a movie than it might seem at first. It had the potential to be a train wreck, but the writer(s) and director -- and of course the cast -- really pulled it off.

  12. #2587
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Given how much he was into fast cars, racing, and such in real life, one imagines you're probably right about him having fun while making The Hunter. I wonder how much of the driving stuff you see in movies like that or Bullitt was actually him, and how much was a stunt driver.
    One of his best films was "Le Mans" where he played a race car driver. He did at least some of the driving in that film.

  13. #2588
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    I would have to cite The Getaway as the ultimate McQueen movie for me.

    Not so much that it's his best acting performance, more that it's just him as the ultimate cool dude.

    Everything about his on screen persona, the way he looks, moves, talks. It just screams...cool.
    That for me would be Bullitt.
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  14. #2589
    Member Since: 3/27/2002 MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vic2012 View Post
    I didn't know Papillon was remade either. And the remake is a couple years old already.
    it takes one conceited, self-absorbed SOB to try to remake a classic of the magnitude of Psycho, Papillon, The Sound Of Music, Ben Hur
    Why is it whenever someone mentions an artist that was clearly progressive (yet not the Symph weenie definition of Prog) do certain people feel compelled to snort "thats not Prog" like a whiny 5th grader?

  15. #2590
    Quote Originally Posted by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER View Post
    it takes one conceited, self-absorbed SOB to try to remake a classic of the magnitude of Psycho, Papillon, The Sound Of Music, Ben Hur
    No. It just takes a studio who own the rights to the movie and can do anything they want with it. Then they can hire/pay someone to make it. Plenty of directors out there desperate for work, same for actors, DOP's, technicians etc.

    And fundamentally they are making a new version of the same story, the intention is not to assume they can improve on the original. That's a fallacy.

    Another factor is many of today's youth will not be familiar with the original or the original actors. No point saying they should be, you can't force them to study film history. They will either watch the originals or they won't. Their choice.

    But a new version with actors they recognise may appeal to them more.

    Not saying it's right, it's just the way it is.

  16. #2591
    Member Since: 3/27/2002 MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post

    Not saying it's right, it's just the way it is.
    and I'm saying it's a massive FAIL for classics of the stature I mentioned. You wanna remake some idiot flick like Rambo, knock yerself out Hollywood... it may even be better that the original.
    Why is it whenever someone mentions an artist that was clearly progressive (yet not the Symph weenie definition of Prog) do certain people feel compelled to snort "thats not Prog" like a whiny 5th grader?

  17. #2592
    Rabid: early David Cronenberg picture starring former Ivory Snow girl Marilyn Chambers as a woman who...well, it's a David Cronenberg movie, it's best to not explain them. Just watch with the caveat you're gonna see some weird shit. And on this occasion, that weird shit involves Marilyn Chambers, who does have a couple topless scenes in the film (What, you think I don't know why Marilyn Chambers got fired by Proctor & Gamble?!).

  18. #2593
    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mail View Post
    Why hubris?

    Remakes are a fact of life. Movies are the property of the studio. You may not like the idea of a remake but you can't stop them being made. They will always happen. Always have. Always will. Petitions?Protests? Nah. Means nothing.

    Bottom line is, you object to a remake of a movie you like? Simple. Dont watch it. Life goes on, and the original movie is still the same and can be enjoyed for as long as you want.
    The 1941 Maltese Falcon is a remake of an early 30s version.

  19. #2594
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    Quote Originally Posted by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER View Post
    and I'm saying it's a massive FAIL for classics of the stature I mentioned. You wanna remake some idiot flick like Rambo, knock yerself out Hollywood... it may even be better that the original.
    What moron would try to remake the stone cold classic that is First Blood? That's just plain silly...
    "Who would have thought a whale would be so heavy?" - Moe

  20. #2595
    Member nosebone's Avatar
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    Remakes are updated for the next generation of film fans.

    Look at all the King Kongs and Spidermans we have?!
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  21. #2596
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    One of his best films was "Le Mans" where he played a race car driver. He did at least some of the driving in that film.
    It's been a while since I've seen it but I agree it was one of his better movies. Not a lot of dialogue, tho, from what I remember. Which is why I think it's a movie racing fans will appreciate more than your average viewer.

    Quote Originally Posted by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER View Post
    and I'm saying it's a massive FAIL for classics of the stature I mentioned. You wanna remake some idiot flick like Rambo, knock yerself out Hollywood... it may even be better that the original.
    What you say implies that it's somehow an insult for a studio to want to remake a classic. I don't think that's usually the case. Many remakes are not designed to improve upon a previous version but rather to tap into a new audience... or to simply cash in on a proven story. Look at how many versions there are of Dickens' A Christmas Carol. There were three feature length versions before the definitive, 1951 version with Alistar Sim. And how many versions have been made since? You might be surprised to know that The Wizard of Oz was a remake. And since you mention it, the 1959 Ben Hur was a remake of the 1925 silent movie. Cecille B DeMille remade his silent version of The Ten Commandments in 1956 and Hitchcock remade his own The Man Who Knew Too Much, both of which were "talkies". And speaking of DeMille, Joseph Mankiewicz, who won the Oscar for All About Eve, remade DeMille's 1934 version of Cleopatra in 1963 with Liz Taylor.

    I think you're also forgetting some import aspects to why movies are remade.

    One is the box office draw of its stars. I remember when Papillon was released. Steve McQueen was a star of the highest caliber at the time and it was a big deal that he was starring with Dustin Hoffman, who had made three huge movies prior, with two Oscar nods as Best Actor: The Graduate, Midnight Cowboy, and Straw Dogs, which was quite controversial at the time. How many Gen Xers, Millenials, and Gen Zed-ers even know who McQueen is? They might know who Hoffman is from Meet the Fockers but he's not a box office draw anymore.

    Some other aspects all relate to how dated a movie feels:
    Regardless of its status, The Sound of Music is - if I may use a passť term - square... and, at times, a little corny.
    Most people these days will not watch a B&W movie. Many of my favorite movies are in B&W but my brother, who's four years older, will not watch a B&W movie.
    Action in the old movies was often unrealistic and toned down, tho not always; it was a huge deal in 1940 when Bette Davis plugged some guy six times in the opening scene of The Letter. By today's standards, that scene's tame.
    The dialogue in older movies, especially during the Hays Code years, is often stilted and required a lot of innuendo. Maybe you're not aware of this but it was considered a big deal in 1939 for Clark Gable to say "damn" in Gone With the Wind. It wasn't until 1970's M*A*S*H that a US movie finally used the word "fuck" (there are a couple of British films that used in '67).

    Remakes have been around since movies began. And because culture evolves remakes will never go away. And, finally, no one's forcing you to watch a remake. If you think they're stupid, fine, don't patronize them. That's what I do.

    Quote Originally Posted by nycsteve View Post
    The 1941 Maltese Falcon is a remake of an early 30s version.
    Holy shit, you're right! I never knew that. Well, the '41 version is the definitive one so it doesn't matter, in a way.
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  22. #2597
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    P.S. First Blood, aka "Rambo", is a modern classic.
    I love sleeping. It's like being dead without the commitment.

  23. #2598
    Quote Originally Posted by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER View Post
    and I'm saying it's a massive FAIL for classics of the stature I mentioned. You wanna remake some idiot flick like Rambo, knock yerself out Hollywood... it may even be better that the original.
    But your opinion is irrelevant in the grand scheme of things, unless you advocate that film studios should consult the public on which movies are considered verboten for a remake.

    They will remake whatever they want to regardless of what anyone thinks.

    And I dont hold in with this notion of remakes somehow tainting the memory of the original. The original cannot change by definition, so if you like the original then ignore the remake.

  24. #2599
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    High Plains Drifter--western, modeled after the spaghetti westerns and directed by Eastwood. He gets hired to protect the town from three outlaws that are headed to the town, but the town harbors a secret. Many of the town people can't be relied on either. Fun western.

  25. #2600
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    ^ Saw that one in a theater on it's initial run.

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