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Thread: Amorphous Jazz

  1. #51
    Member StarThrower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    Yup, those amazon prices are amazingly stupendous.
    That's why people shop at discogs.

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Splicer View Post
    Nat Birchall is somewhat in this vein but I tend to hear his work as more along the lines of a Coltrane pastiche.
    Yes, there are very explicit echoes of Coltrane in his playing & compositions, but also of Pharaoh Sanders - especially on Akhenaten & Guiding Spirit. Creation & Sacred Dimension are closer to Alice Coltrane with Sanders. His most recent, Sounds Almighty, delves deeply into roots & dub reggae - again, it's uncanny just how much this record sounds like it could have come out of Scratch Perry's or King Tubby's or Keith Hudson's studios in the mid-70s. I think that you're right to suggest that his records veer close to pastiche...but I think there's enough going on to make them worth listening to on their own merits.

  3. #53
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    These days, "pastiches" and tributes and echoes and copies, intentional or not, are often valued just as highly as original work. When a listener discovers Coltrane and Birchall in the same year, who's to say who is copying whom?

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    I’d like some recommendations for jazz suites, jazz which isn’t necessarily based on tunes but consists of long modal improvisations. During the 1970s this sort of thing became, if not commonplace, at least acceptable, after Miles Davis pioneered modal jazz with “Kind of Blue.” I’m thinking here of Herbie Hancock’s “Mwandishi” and Les McCann’s “Invitation To Openness.” I recently ran across a newer example in Charles Lloyd’s “Wild Man Dance” and I’d like to find more.
    https://youtube.com/watch?v=WbPC2jroxsc
    Actually,Miles didn't pioneer modal jazz, though he did popularize it. If you want the roots of modal jazz, check out pianist Lennie Tristano, 1949.

    Of course Coltrane's '60s quartet with McCoy Tyner (another major modal player) was big in this arena too, before the saxophonist turned more decidedly free.

    I'm coming late to this thread and haven't read it all, suspecting others have suggested modal stuff, but had to cite Tristano, as he's often overlooked.

    FYI, I was at the premiere of Wild Man Dance in Wrocław, Poland. A staggering show, to say the least.
    John Kelman
    Senior Contributor, All About Jazz since 2004
    Freelance writer/photographer

  5. #55
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Lee Morgan "The Last Session"

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