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Thread: New here and looking

  1. #1

    New here and looking

    Maybe not new, I have an account so...

    I'm looking to connect with musicians somewhat versed in 20th century classical, hopefully a bit deeper than the intro to Firebird haha. I'm talking Barber, Milhaud, Ginastera (thanks ELP), Stravinsky, Bartok, Chavez, Varese, Pierre Henri, etc. For purely selfish reasons of course.

    I go for the longer forms ala Yes and Genesis and absolutely love them but I see no point in trying to recapture the year 1972. I suppose if I'd heard anything as unique as King Crimson I'd rethink that, but I haven't. Prog-metal turns me off, symphonic prog is overblown - I just can't listen to songs about Boreas God of the North Wind - and anything that is unnecessarily played in 13/8 just sounds...like what it is. I know there's great stuff I haven't heard.

    Anyway working alone sucks. I'm fair to good at writing interesting sections of music but terrible at finishing things. There's a plague of me's out there. I need someone with a similar or intersecting style to bounce ideas back and forth and push things forward. Hopefully someone who loves Aaron Copland!

    I'll put a link on my about page for reference, I can't just blab and not show something. Interestingly young indie types like it and old prog types detest it.

  2. #2
    Well, you sound like a good candidate for TP (am I violating some PE self-promo norm? ) Try this song: https://cuneiformrecords.bandcamp.co...g-against-hope

  3. #3
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arcticranger View Post
    There's a plague of me's out there.
    Mike's got your number, Ranger.

  4. #4
    ah that's industrial strength sh*t. significant Henry Cow / Art Bears influence if I'm not tripping. i will dig into this.

    I'd be curious what in the classical realm influences you.

  5. #5
    i think he responds to anyone who says PLAGUE. ha!

  6. #6
    Don’t get him started on William Schuman.

  7. #7
    Hey Artic - like Kurt says, yes, William Schuman, but also LOTS of Shostakovich listening over the years, and various mostly first half of 20th century stuff, like Britten, Copland (I grew up on his tonal stuff, but my faves are the Short Symphony and Music for a Great City), pre-neo-classical Stravinsky, some Bernstein, and some works of many others. Throw in Beatles, Crimson, Yes, Mahavishnu, Gentle Giant, H. Cow and Art Bears, and odds and ends after that, and voilŠ, me. And 5uus are also great, esp. hungerís Teeth, Crisis in Clay and Regarding Purgatories. I donít seem to be moved much by newer stuff, that I hear anyway. But, I am OLD! (Which of course means Iím wise!

  8. #8
    MJ, thanks, I like it when artists actually name their "inputs", here in NYC they tend to give you the eye-roll - how can I possibly be defined??

    I hate bombast and that knocks Shostakovich, Britten, Holst and others off the table for me, enigmatic as they may be. There's nothing I don't like by Copland, the first four minutes of Billy the Kid --> hair raising. On Stravinsky, his Symphony in Three Movements is considered neo-classical but is really closer to the machine rhythms of the Rite. On Schuman yup I'm in the camp that finds him dry. I suspect it's brain wiring, ie we respond to our own pattern reflections in art.

    TP - I'm listening. You don't make things easy. Check out the ensemble Yarn/ Wire. And yes old is wise.

  9. #9
    well TP is quite an accomplishment. Stringent!

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