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  1. #126
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
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    Steiner on the possibility of booting Grosjean - in his typically funny way. (read the whole article - it's short.)

    https://www.essentiallysports.com/f1...021-f1-season/
    Regards,

    Duncan

  2. #127
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
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    A head-to-head comparison of team mates:

    https://www.skysports.com/f1/news/12...279G28DYV_Zcfk
    Regards,

    Duncan

  3. #128
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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  4. #129
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
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    If practices 1 and 2 are washed out - do they still have the full compliment of tires available for qualifying and the race?
    Regards,

    Duncan

  5. #130
    Member Burley Wright's Avatar
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    No, they had to turn in the sets they didn't use, I think they have the same tires for qualifying and the race as they would have had if P1 and P2 had run normally.

  6. #131
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burley Wright View Post
    No, they had to turn in the sets they didn't use, I think they have the same tires for qualifying and the race as they would have had if P1 and P2 had run normally.
    I thought that might be the case.

    Pity - I'd love to see fewer restrictions regarding tires. I wish they weren't so central to ... everything.
    Regards,

    Duncan

  7. #132
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    After Lewis, the standings have tightened up. Max has gained on Botas and the battle for 4th may come down to the last race. And look at 4th-11th:
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    8
    9
    10
    11
    Bottas
    Max
    Ricciardo
    Perez
    Norris
    Albon
    Leclerc
    Stroll
    Gasly
    Sainz
    161
    147
    78
    68
    65
    64
    63
    57
    53
    51
    Ocon is in 12th but with only 36 points after his DNF, yesterday.

    And poor Norris and Albon, both with DNFs, dropped two places each.

    -------------------------

    The stats that prove Perez deserves a seat in F1 Ė but why he might still miss out
    Lawrence Barretto
    06 October 2020

    For many, it felt unjust when Racing Point announced they were releasing Sergio Perez at the end of the season, not least because the Mexican is driving at the peak of his career and is arguably one of the most complete drivers on the grid right now.

    The timing of the decision wasnít ideal for the eight-time podium finisher, with most seats already signed for 2021. Haas and Alfa Romeo are the most obvious candidates with openings, but it is believed both are leaning in other directions right now, while Mercedes are set to re-sign Lewis Hamilton and joining the Red Bull family is a long-shot as they look to keep their line-ups in-house.

    That means Perezís 10-year stay in Formula 1 Ė which includes seven campaigns with Force India/Racing Point Ė could be set to come to an end. Take a look at the stats, and you'll see why many in the sport believe he deserves to race on in the top flight...

    In nine full seasons in Formula 1, racing in machinery that has largely hovered in the mid to lower end of the midfield, the Mexican has finished on average 9.8th in the driversí championship, peaking with seventh in 2016 and 2017. Perez is just one point behind team mate Stroll despite missing two races this season.

    That average improves to 8.5th when you count the six full years heís spent with Force India/Racing Point.

    When you remove six slots usually occupied by drivers from the 'Big three' teams, that is impressive consistency. He has scored an average of 3.46pts per race, having competed in 188 Grands Prix weekends. That equates to 63.70 per season, which is a score that is good enough for a top-10 finish in the driversí championship in nine of the last 10 F1 campaigns.

    Qualifying has been the weaker side of his game, but he still has an average start of 11th and his skills on a Sunday afternoon are well known, with an average finish of ninth Ė thatís an average finish inside the points.

    He's as strong off track as he is on track

    And itís not simply his antics on track which are important. Heís a team player. From being brave enough to put Force India into administration himself to ultimately save it and allow the operation to rise from the ashes into its current iteration to the high level feedback he gives the team, Perez is regarded very highly.

    He was critical to Force India achieving their best-ever fourth-place finishes in the constructorsí championship in 2016 and 2017, when they were operating on a slender budget, scoring the majority of points in both those campaigns, racing alongside Nico Hulkenberg and then Esteban Ocon. Perez has scored five of Force India/Racing Point's six podiums.

    In the last six full seasons Ė 2014-2019, there have been 381 podiums scored. Of those, only 19 have come from drivers in teams outside the top three. And of those, Perez has scored five of them (26%) Ė a considerably better ratio than anyone else.

    Heís team leader material

    His form against team mates has been strong, too, winning the intra-team battle six times in nine seasons, consistently better than Hulkenberg, Ocon and Lance Stroll.

    When you stick Perez in the car, you know that heíll get 100% out of the package, particularly on a Sunday afternoon. His tyre management is up there with the best, his feel for how they evolve and patience in the heat of battle means he can extend stints and ultimately do a faster race time.

    Itís why Racing point were so keen to get him back in the car as soon as possible after he tested positive for Covid-19. Silverstone is a track which perfectly suits this yearís RP20. A podium in both races was there was the taking, and Perez was best-placed of their line-up to do that. Missing him hurt their points tally heavily.

    Why he will likely still miss out

    A driver with this amount of quality deserves a place on the F1 grid. His rivals say it. Respected F1 personnel say it. Analysts say it.

    But as weíve seen all too often in Formula 1 over the years, sometimes that is not enough to keep your seat. Timing hasnít worked in his favor and while his experience is hugely useful in one sense, it requires a vast expense that will not be as favorable to a midfield team as a cheaper option.

    Sure, he comes with significant financial backing through his suite of Mexican sponsors, but from that sum must come his salary. Suddenly, itís not as attractive a proposition as, for example, a young prospect from a driver academy that will supply financial support.

    Of course, there are still seats free Ė which means itís not yet over for Perez Ė but the chatter behind the scenes suggests the door might be closing and Perez isnít that keen on a seat near the back of the pack. Perhaps a season in Indycar beckons next year, before attempting an F1 return in 2022.

    Perez will know that once youíre out of the F1 picture, itís mighty hard to return. But if there is someone talented enough to do so, itís Checo.

    As I was reading this article, it struck me that there is some irony here. Perez took legal action against his own team to force them into administration. This was done to protect everything else about the team. This enabled the team to survive with new ownership, albeit with a change of name. It also led to Perez remaining in F1. Smart. But now in 2020, Perez will be out because Racing Point has no loyalty to Perez. Had Force India been able to get their ducks in a row and stay solvent, would they have ousted Perez when Vettel became available? I don't know but I doubt it.

    So, the question is: should Perez stay in F1 and go to Alfa or Haas (Horner has indicated numerous times that not only will Albon will stay at Red Bull but the drivers in their program will be at Alpha) or go to Indycar?

    And which is more difficult: going to a good team after a year with a back marker or going to a good team after a year in Indycar? Good drivers in Indycar have gone to F1: Andretti, Villeneuve, Montoya, Zanardi, and Bourdais. Zanardi even did two stints in F1, starting there, going to CART, back to F1, and finishing in CART. But I don't recall a driver ever going from a good F1 team to a bottom tier team and then back to a good team. Both options seem like the death knell for Perez if he wants to drive for a good team in F1.

    Man, Checo got screwed.
    If God wanted us to listen to audio books, She wouldn't have given us eyes to watch TV. - Gene Belcher

  8. #133
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    After Lewis, the standings have tightened up. Max has gained on Botas and the battle for 4th may come down to the last race. And look at 4th-11th:
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    8
    9
    10
    11
    Bottas
    Max
    Ricciardo
    Perez
    Norris
    Albon
    Leclerc
    Stroll
    Gasly
    Sainz
    161
    147
    78
    68
    65
    64
    63
    57
    53
    51
    Ocon is in 12th but with only 36 points after his DNF, yesterday.

    And poor Norris and Albon, both with DNFs, dropped two places each.

    -------------------------

    The stats that prove Perez deserves a seat in F1 Ė but why he might still miss out
    Lawrence Barretto
    06 October 2020

    For many, it felt unjust when Racing Point announced they were releasing Sergio Perez at the end of the season, not least because the Mexican is driving at the peak of his career and is arguably one of the most complete drivers on the grid right now.

    The timing of the decision wasnít ideal for the eight-time podium finisher, with most seats already signed for 2021. Haas and Alfa Romeo are the most obvious candidates with openings, but it is believed both are leaning in other directions right now, while Mercedes are set to re-sign Lewis Hamilton and joining the Red Bull family is a long-shot as they look to keep their line-ups in-house.

    That means Perezís 10-year stay in Formula 1 Ė which includes seven campaigns with Force India/Racing Point Ė could be set to come to an end. Take a look at the stats, and you'll see why many in the sport believe he deserves to race on in the top flight...

    In nine full seasons in Formula 1, racing in machinery that has largely hovered in the mid to lower end of the midfield, the Mexican has finished on average 9.8th in the driversí championship, peaking with seventh in 2016 and 2017. Perez is just one point behind team mate Stroll despite missing two races this season.

    That average improves to 8.5th when you count the six full years heís spent with Force India/Racing Point.

    When you remove six slots usually occupied by drivers from the 'Big three' teams, that is impressive consistency. He has scored an average of 3.46pts per race, having competed in 188 Grands Prix weekends. That equates to 63.70 per season, which is a score that is good enough for a top-10 finish in the driversí championship in nine of the last 10 F1 campaigns.

    Qualifying has been the weaker side of his game, but he still has an average start of 11th and his skills on a Sunday afternoon are well known, with an average finish of ninth Ė thatís an average finish inside the points.

    He's as strong off track as he is on track

    And itís not simply his antics on track which are important. Heís a team player. From being brave enough to put Force India into administration himself to ultimately save it and allow the operation to rise from the ashes into its current iteration to the high level feedback he gives the team, Perez is regarded very highly.

    He was critical to Force India achieving their best-ever fourth-place finishes in the constructorsí championship in 2016 and 2017, when they were operating on a slender budget, scoring the majority of points in both those campaigns, racing alongside Nico Hulkenberg and then Esteban Ocon. Perez has scored five of Force India/Racing Point's six podiums.

    In the last six full seasons Ė 2014-2019, there have been 381 podiums scored. Of those, only 19 have come from drivers in teams outside the top three. And of those, Perez has scored five of them (26%) Ė a considerably better ratio than anyone else.

    Heís team leader material

    His form against team mates has been strong, too, winning the intra-team battle six times in nine seasons, consistently better than Hulkenberg, Ocon and Lance Stroll.

    When you stick Perez in the car, you know that heíll get 100% out of the package, particularly on a Sunday afternoon. His tyre management is up there with the best, his feel for how they evolve and patience in the heat of battle means he can extend stints and ultimately do a faster race time.

    Itís why Racing point were so keen to get him back in the car as soon as possible after he tested positive for Covid-19. Silverstone is a track which perfectly suits this yearís RP20. A podium in both races was there was the taking, and Perez was best-placed of their line-up to do that. Missing him hurt their points tally heavily.

    Why he will likely still miss out

    A driver with this amount of quality deserves a place on the F1 grid. His rivals say it. Respected F1 personnel say it. Analysts say it.

    But as weíve seen all too often in Formula 1 over the years, sometimes that is not enough to keep your seat. Timing hasnít worked in his favor and while his experience is hugely useful in one sense, it requires a vast expense that will not be as favorable to a midfield team as a cheaper option.

    Sure, he comes with significant financial backing through his suite of Mexican sponsors, but from that sum must come his salary. Suddenly, itís not as attractive a proposition as, for example, a young prospect from a driver academy that will supply financial support.

    Of course, there are still seats free Ė which means itís not yet over for Perez Ė but the chatter behind the scenes suggests the door might be closing and Perez isnít that keen on a seat near the back of the pack. Perhaps a season in Indycar beckons next year, before attempting an F1 return in 2022.

    Perez will know that once youíre out of the F1 picture, itís mighty hard to return. But if there is someone talented enough to do so, itís Checo.

    As I was reading this article, it struck me that there is some irony here. Perez took legal action against his own team to force them into administration. This was done to protect everything else about the team. This enabled the team to survive with new ownership, albeit with a change of name. It also led to Perez remaining in F1. Smart. But now in 2020, Perez will be out because Racing Point has no loyalty to Perez. Had Force India been able to get their ducks in a row and stay solvent, would they have ousted Perez when Vettel became available? I don't know but I doubt it.

    So, the question is: should Perez stay in F1 and go to Alfa or Haas (Horner has indicated numerous times that not only will Albon will stay at Red Bull but the drivers in their program will be at Alpha) or go to Indycar?

    And which is more difficult: going to a good team after a year with a back marker or going to a good team after a year in Indycar? Good drivers in Indycar have gone to F1: Andretti, Villeneuve, Montoya, Zanardi, and Bourdais. Zanardi even did two stints in F1, starting there, going to CART, back to F1, and finishing in CART. But I don't recall a driver ever going from a good F1 team to a bottom tier team and then back to a good team. Both options seem like the death knell for Perez if he wants to drive for a good team in F1.

    Man, Checo got screwed.
    Totally agree. This season alone Perez has been a constant on the 2nd or 3rd rows on the grid, and finishing well into the points. And - he brings big $$$ to his team. Very weird how the politics of F1 work. I thought of him as an also-ran before, but he's earned my respect over the last 2 years.

    I think Horner is being very closed-minded about Albon. I also heard from several articles that as good as Gasly is, he's becoming increasingly UNpopular within the closed bubble of the Red Bull teams - so much so that there are rumors of him losing his drive. So - who knows if Perez and/or Hulkenberg might still be in the running for a 2021 seat.

    What's (mildly) interesting to know is which drivers the technical teams respect the most. Among them Hamilton, Albon, and (most particularly) Vettel, apparently pay more attention to their mechanics wellbeing, keep in touch with their families, and help out where they can in other ways.

    And in other news - Norris's radio transmissions were - interesting!



    BTW - this was the first time that ESPN (in my area, anyway) did not show the race live, and interrupted the race with commercials. I really hope that doesn't become the pattern!
    Regards,

    Duncan

  9. #134
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
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    No f***ing way!

    Russell Out? Williams F1 Reportedly Considering Sergio Perez for 2021
    https://www.essentiallysports.com/f1...erez-for-2021/


    Typical of Williams in the past several years - they're going with moneyed drivers. Remember Kubica? And Stroll before him? Both brought big bux.

    And now - if there's any truth to this report - Perez has big $$$ behind him, and spin-a-lot Latifi has more.

    Russell is very talented and deserves a better team than Williams. Heck - I wouldn't mind seeing him replacing Bottas
    Regards,

    Duncan

  10. #135
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duncan Glenday View Post
    BTW - this was the first time that ESPN (in my area, anyway) did not show the race live, and interrupted the race with commercials.
    Huh. I streamed it so I saw it live. Strange about the commercials. But let me ask you, did they actually leave out any of the race? I know in the past, when ESPN first started showing Sky's broadcast, they'd cut to a commercial but it was like they also hit the pause button on the feed. Yes, there was a commercial but the viewer didn't miss anything.

    And I hate to be that guy, but consider the alternative: NBC having two commercial breaks during the last 10 or 12 laps of the Indy 500. That still pisses me off to no end.
    If God wanted us to listen to audio books, She wouldn't have given us eyes to watch TV. - Gene Belcher

  11. #136
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    Huh. I streamed it so I saw it live. Strange about the commercials. But let me ask you, did they actually leave out any of the race? I know in the past, when ESPN first started showing Sky's broadcast, they'd cut to a commercial but it was like they also hit the pause button on the feed. Yes, there was a commercial but the viewer didn't miss anything.

    And I hate to be that guy, but consider the alternative: NBC having two commercial breaks during the last 10 or 12 laps of the Indy 500. That still pisses me off to no end.
    No - if there's good news, it's that they continued coverage exactly where it had been left off. MUCH better than a few years ago when the 3 US-based presenters would do the commentary live-in-a-studio, and the cuts to commercials caused us to miss race coverage.
    Regards,

    Duncan

  12. #137
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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  13. #138
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    Thanks - most of this, we already knew. But this was a surprise, and explains a lot:

    The Red Bull drink is based on a Thai family-owned recipe provided to Mateschitz under agreement. There are imperatives to keep the Thai faction sweet, and perceptions among the media are that the teamís comments about Thai driver Albon...
    And I agree with their conclusion:

    which surely proves that F1 desperately needs 12 teams, not its current 10
    Regards,

    Duncan

  14. #139
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Yeah, I never knew the story behind Red Bull and once I learned that, Horner's comments now make sense since Albon's family is Thai.

    Totally agree about more teams. Maybe once they put a cap on engine costs other teams may join feeling it's not too expensive.
    If God wanted us to listen to audio books, She wouldn't have given us eyes to watch TV. - Gene Belcher

  15. #140
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    I saw this on my phone yesterday and forgot to post it: Grosjean surprised that both he and Magnussen were dropped by Haas

    $100 says Perez will be on of Haas' drivers next year:

    ...Magnussen confirmed that, despite bringing backing from sponsors and partners, he wasn’t able to bring the sort of budget that could really make a significant difference to the team’s finances – a situation Grosjean said was similar to his own.

    If I'm right, the question is who will be his teammate? The way everyone keeps mentioning Schumacher, I think he has the best chance. But there's also Hulk and some others. Who knows?
    Last edited by Hal...; 23 Hours Ago at 05:23 PM.
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  16. #141
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    I saw this on my phone yesterday and forgot to post it: Grosjean surprised that both he and Magnussen were dropped by Haas

    $100 says Perez will be on of Haas' drivers next year:

    ...Magnussen confirmed that, despite bringing backing from sponsors and partners, he wasn’t able to bring the sort of budget that could really make a significant difference to the team’s finances – a situation Grosjean said was similar to his own.

    If I'm right, the question is who will be his teammate? The way everyone keeps mentioning Schumacher, I think he has the best chance. But there's also Hulk and some others. Who knows?
    If I was Gene or Guenther, I'd hire Perez (money, experience, and talent) and pair him with the best up-and-comer from the minor leagues. (Schumacher, or whoever.)
    Regards,

    Duncan

  17. #142
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Agreed
    Ian

    Gordon Haskell - "You've got to keep the groove in your head and play a load of bollocks instead"
    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
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  18. #143
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Well, we've all been lamenting Perez's loss of drive and have championed him as one of the best of the rest, so I have to agree, as well. Aside from Schumacher, another I keep seeing as a possible young gun entering the fray for 2021 is Belarussian billionaire Dmitry Mazepin's son, Nikita, whose father is worth ~7 billion USD. Like it or not, how much money a driver brings to his team is now of paramount importance, especially for a struggling team.
    If God wanted us to listen to audio books, She wouldn't have given us eyes to watch TV. - Gene Belcher

  19. #144
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    Well, we've all been lamenting Perez's loss of drive and have championed him as one of the best of the rest, so I have to agree, as well. Aside from Schumacher, another I keep seeing as a possible young gun entering the fray for 2021 is Belarussian billionaire Dmitry Mazepin's son, Nikita, whose father is worth ~7 billion USD. Like it or not, how much money a driver brings to his team is now of paramount importance, especially for a struggling team.
    Yah - the reasonably good drivers with rich daddies brings down the overall quality of the field, IMO.

    I heard Mazepin's Daddy wanted to buy team Haas.

    Mazepin = Stroll Mark-II.

    Regards,

    Duncan

  20. #145
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Agreed, Hamilton must get on Bottas' nerves. Ahead of him all weekend then pipped for pole on the last run of Q3.
    Ian

    Gordon Haskell - "You've got to keep the groove in your head and play a load of bollocks instead"
    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

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