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Thread: Time for a New Pat Metheny Group Thread

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    “Beyond The Missouri Sky.”
    This is a wonderful album. Metheny gets no small amount of credit from me for exposing Charlie Haden to a wider audience than he might otherwise have reached, starting with 80/81. Their sounds and approaches are so simpatico, and anything the two of them played on together is worth a listen.
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  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by rdclark View Post
    It's hard to talk about Metheny's current quartet hee because they haven't yet, but when they do I expect the result to be spectacular. Sanchez is there, of course, but the newcomers -- Linda Oh on bass and Gwilym Simcock on piano -- are not just sympatico with Pat in the quartet setting but also accomplished and recognized players and leaders in their own rights.

    Simcock is well known, particularly in Europe. In his playing here -- https://youtu.be/w2Q9nQg4JmM -- I think you can hear how he shares a common sensibility with Metheny compositionally.

    If you have a chance to catch the current quartet on tour, don't miss it. They have apparently recorded, but I've not seen a release date.
    For anyone interested, some Gwilym/Gwilym-related content here, here, here, here, here and here (specifically, Volume One).

    Cheers!
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  3. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Today I ran across a couple used Metheny albums I wasn’t familiar with.

    “Quartet” is a 1996 album with Lyle, Steve Rodby (bass) and Paul Wertico (drums) that is largely improvised. Lots of unusual sounds, very creative, contemplative, ECMish. I like it a lot.

    “One Quiet Night” is a solo effort from 2003 on baritone acoustic guitar (with a pickup). That extra half-octave really gives a gorgeous tone on Pat’s gentle picking. Stunning recording too. The tone is almost in the range of the recordings Kottke did with his Bozo before it got stolen.
    Both of those albums are great. On One Quiet Night, in addition to the baritone guitar, he also uses a variation on "Nashville" tuning, where only the two middle strings are tuned an octave higher. Apart from the early records, I tend to prefer the "less manicured" records (as a writer for Guitar Player once put it), where it sounds like the music was put together relatively quickly, with a smaller group (or in the case of One Quiet Night, just him), etc. I think the music really benefits from that approach.

  4. #54
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by proggy_jazzer View Post
    This is a wonderful album. Metheny gets no small amount of credit from me for exposing Charlie Haden to a wider audience than he might otherwise have reached, starting with 80/81. Their sounds and approaches are so simpatico, and anything the two of them played on together is worth a listen.
    I think that's true for Ornette, as well. I think a lot of people came to Ornette via Pat. I came to Ornette via "Of Human Feelings," but.....he was pretty "outside" back then (though Prime Time did appear on SNL!)
    "And this is the chorus.....or perhaps it's a bridge...."

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Today I ran across a couple used Metheny albums I wasn’t familiar with.

    “Quartet” is a 1996 album with Lyle, Steve Rodby (bass) and Paul Wertico (drums) that is largely improvised. Lots of unusual sounds, very creative, contemplative, ECMish. I like it a lot.

    “One Quiet Night” is a solo effort from 2003 on baritone acoustic guitar (with a pickup). That extra half-octave really gives a gorgeous tone on Pat’s gentle picking. Stunning recording too. The tone is almost in the range of the recordings Kottke did with his Bozo before it got stolen.
    Yeppers, great suggestions. Both are fine albums. They are very different in character form each other, of course. "Quartet" features great interplay between Wertico and Rodby. Naturally, Lyle and Pat shine as always.

    "One Quiet Night" is great for an introspective situation and is lovely.
    Special tip: before or after that CD, try Mike Metheny's "Day In, Night Out" which has Pat playing on a number of tracks. A sterling CD. My favorite track is the cover of Charlie Parker's "Segment". (That track was the standout tune when I saw Kenny Barron and Dave Holland in San Francisco a month ago.)

    And speaking of good Pat CDs (and specifically, Pat CDs with the word "Quartet" in it), be sure to listen to the Brad Mehldau/Pat Metheny CD "Quartet." It is great.

    By the way, the Coleman element is always interesting. For many Pat fans, "Song X" is the only CD that they don't own (or never, EVER listen to). But for my old roomie that loves the harder things in music, "Song X" is the only Pat CD he LIKES! I love that...

  7. #57
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotron View Post
    for my old roomie that loves the harder things in music, "Song X" is the only Pat CD he LIKES! I love that...
    How does your old roomie like Zero Tolerance for Silence and The Sign of Four?

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave (in MA) View Post
    How does your old roomie like Zero Tolerance for Silence and The Sign of Four?
    I don't know if he has heard them. I bet he'd love both.

  9. #59
    Member rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Are there any essential albums by alumni of the PMG?

    I have (& love) all of Mark Egan’s albums, particularly “Mosaic.” I have (& like) all of the Elements albums, particularly the first four. Yesterday I ran across “Aquamarine” by Danny Gottlieb, which is pretty good. Nothing spectacular.

    What else might I look into?

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Are there any essential albums by alumni of the PMG?

    I have (& love) all of Mark Egan’s albums, particularly “Mosaic.” I have (& like) all of the Elements albums, particularly the first four. Yesterday I ran across “Aquamarine” by Danny Gottlieb, which is pretty good. Nothing spectacular.

    What else might I look into?
    I always liked Lyle Mays' Self-Titled album from 1986. The Alaskan Suite on the second side seemed like a larger work that I always wanted to hear from PMG. Mays' playing is so melodic. From his wiki page:

    He has also composed and recorded music for children's records, such as Tale of Peter Rabbit, with text read by Meryl Streep.[3]
    The Steppenwolf Theater Company of Chicago featured an assortment of compositions by Lyle Mays and Pat Metheny for their production of Lyle Kessler's play Orphans.[11]
    He has composed classical music such as "Twelve Days in the Shadow of a Miracle", a piece for harp, flute, viola, and synthesizer (recorded in 1996 by the Debussy Trio).[12]
    Mays plays a Steinway Grand Piano with built-in MIDI. He has used an Oberheim 8 Voice Synth, a Sequential Circuits Prophet 5, Kurzweil K250, Korg DW-8000, Korg Triton keyboards, and many more.In an interview with JAZZIZ magazine in 2016, Mays revealed his current career as a software manager.
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  11. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by BrianG View Post
    I always liked Lyle Mays' Self-Titled album from 1986.
    I second this suggestion. Really good stuff on this one, and probably my favorite of Mays' solo ventures.

    It shows just how integral he was to the sound of PMG.

  12. #62
    What was the name of the Steve Reich piece that Metheny performed? I remember seeing a news piece somewhere, back in the late 80's, where they talked about a piece that Reich had composed for Metheny to play. It revolved around tape loops of Metheny's guitar playing, with Metheny playing live on top of it. I want to say it was called Different Trains, but I'm not sure.

    Edit: the name of the piece I'm thinking of is Electric Counterpoint, which was apparently released on an album with Different Trains (which was a piece for string quartet), which is why I have the two titles confused.

    Anyhow, anyone heard it?

  13. #63
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    Generally I find Philip Glass impossibly pretentious but this is kinda nice.

  14. #64
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    This version has Pat playing over Glass's loops.


  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianG View Post
    .In an interview with JAZZIZ magazine in 2016, Mays revealed his current career as a software manager.
    That someone so talented and successful had to find a second career outside of music speaks volumes about the industry.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    This version has Pat playing over Glass's loops.

    I had no idea this existed. Wow
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Are there any essential albums by alumni of the PMG?

    I have (& love) all of Mark Egan’s albums, particularly “Mosaic.” I have (& like) all of the Elements albums, particularly the first four. Yesterday I ran across “Aquamarine” by Danny Gottlieb, which is pretty good. Nothing spectacular.

    What else might I look into?
    I really like Fictionary, his trio side from 1992, because I had a special contact with the material: playing several of the compositions on a trio recital with the man himself the year the record came out. I was new on the job as bass professor at UW-Stevens Point, and the jazz faculty wanted to start a combo festival as a recruiting venture. The then-director of jazz studies knew Lyle from when he was growing up in WI, and asked him to be the inaugural guest artist. The faculty drummer and I did a trio set with Lyle on the evening's concert. We were young and very, very green, but he was gracious and encouraging. I remember in rehearsal, while going over the solo section of one of the tunes, Lyle played some particularly adventurous stuff that I'm sure Marc Johnson and Jack DeJohnette had no problem hanging with, but I and the drummer totally lost the thread and folded. We stopped, and Lyle kind of tented his hands over the piano, looked at us, and said something like "guys...just hang in there with me.", meaning to trust him and not panic. The concert went quite well, and playing with him was one of the biggest thrills of my playing/teaching career.
    David
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  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by proggy_jazzer View Post
    I really like Fictionary, his trio side from 1992, because I had a special contact with the material: playing several of the compositions on a trio recital with the man himself the year the record came out. I was new on the job as bass professor at UW-Stevens Point, and the jazz faculty wanted to start a combo festival as a recruiting venture. The then-director of jazz studies knew Lyle from when he was growing up in WI, and asked him to be the inaugural guest artist. The faculty drummer and I did a trio set with Lyle on the evening's concert. We were young and very, very green, but he was gracious and encouraging. I remember in rehearsal, while going over the solo section of one of the tunes, Lyle played some particularly adventurous stuff that I'm sure Marc Johnson and Jack DeJohnette had no problem hanging with, but I and the drummer totally lost the thread and folded. We stopped, and Lyle kind of tented his hands over the piano, looked at us, and said something like "guys...just hang in there with me.", meaning to trust him and not panic. The concert went quite well, and playing with him was one of the biggest thrills of my playing/teaching career.
    A great post, PJ. Lyle is such a fine musician.

  19. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Are there any essential albums by alumni of the PMG?

    I have (& love) all of Mark Egan’s albums, particularly “Mosaic.” I have (& like) all of the Elements albums, particularly the first four. Yesterday I ran across “Aquamarine” by Danny Gottlieb, which is pretty good. Nothing spectacular.

    What else might I look into?
    I have one of the albums bassist Steve Rodby did in the late 80's with a guitarist named Ross Traut for Columbia. I don't know if I'd call it essential, but if you like the 80's Metheny sound it's worth finding.

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by pb2015 View Post
    I have one of the albums bassist Steve Rodby did in the late 80's with a guitarist named Ross Traut for Columbia. I don't know if I'd call it essential, but if you like the 80's Metheny sound it's worth finding.
    Well, if we are going to mention players going for the same sound at Pat, I suggest Brian Hughes.
    YMMV

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by pb2015 View Post
    I have one of the albums bassist Steve Rodby did in the late 80's with a guitarist named Ross Traut for Columbia. I don't know if I'd call it essential, but if you like the 80's Metheny sound it's worth finding.
    Rodby is on Metheny's "Quartet" album (1996) and in something called Internationally Recognised Aliens, which sounds pretty Methenyish to my ears.


  22. #72
    Rodby was bassist of Pat Metheny Group since 1981, and also has coproduced most of Metheny's albums recently even when he doesn't play on them. Lyle Mays mentioned that lately Rodby has been involved in editing vocal tracks for other mainstream artists' CDs, which Mays compared with being in the CIA.

    I haven't heard of the CD you mentioned but Gwilym Simcock is in Metheny's current band, and Adam Nussbaum and Metheny may have crossed paths.

  23. #73
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    I was wrong. The band is called The Impossible Gentlemen and the ALBUM is called "Internationally Recognised Aliens." They've released three albums, their self-titled debut (2011), the one listed above (2013) and "Let's Get Deluxe" (2016). Rodby supplemented on the second album and permanently replaced Steve Swallow on the third. It's all very nice Metheny-ish stuff.

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by pb2015 View Post
    I have one of the albums bassist Steve Rodby did in the late 80's with a guitarist named Ross Traut for Columbia.
    Which one do you have, "The Great Lawn" (1989) or "The Duo Life" (1991)? I found a copy of the latter no problem, but the former seems to be massively rare and/or overpriced.

  25. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Which one do you have, "The Great Lawn" (1989) or "The Duo Life" (1991)? I found a copy of the latter no problem, but the former seems to be massively rare and/or overpriced.
    The Great Lawn, I got lucky and found it as a bargain bin LP a few years ago. I only remember that it has a jazz/samba version of Joni Mitchell's "All I Want." I should listen to it again.

    BTW I believe Ross Traut is a contemporary of Metheny's with a similar style, who wasn't as aggressive in self-promotion as Metheny.

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