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Thread: The Elf King needs suggestions - new prog?

  1. #1

    The Elf King needs suggestions - new prog?

    I've been out of it for some time but The Elf King is back!
    Any suggestions of new prog acts that I should hear?
    I've been a big fan of Yes, ELP, Tull, Gentle Giant, Barclay James Harvest, Gabriel era Genesis
    and Strawbs. Would love some recommendations.
    Thanks!
    Tom

  2. #2
    All-night hippo at diner Tom's Avatar
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    There is a "best of 2017 (so far)" thread, that sounds perfect for you.

    http://www.progressiveears.org/forum...of-2017-so-far
    ... “there’s a million ways to learn” (which there are, by the way), but ironically, there’s a million things to eat, I’m just not sure I want to eat them all. -- Jeff Berlin

  3. #3
    Studmuffin Scott Bails's Avatar
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    A few suggestions:

    Spock's Beard
    Big Big Train
    Lifesigns

    I'm sure others will have other worthy suggestions.
    Music isn't about chops, or even about talent - it's about sound and the way that sound communicates to people. Mike Keneally

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    ***New Strawbs Record***

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    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    When did you stop listening and seeking out new prog? We need to know how far to go back. If you missed the 90s, for example, it's going to be a long list.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

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    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Are you the artist formerly known as The Dark Elf?
    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

    "And it's only the giving
    That makes you what you are" - Ian Anderson

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Are you the artist formerly known as The Dark Elf?
    No, but who is The Dark Elf? What albums would you recommend?

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    When did you stop listening and seeking out new prog? We need to know how far to go back. If you missed the 90s, for example, it's going to be a long list.
    I'm really only familiar with a handful of the 90's bands. So mainly I'm just listening to the classics and hoping something new will have some of that old magic. Just don't know where to start. Anything past 2000 that's worth checking out?

  9. #9
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Elf King View Post
    Anything past 2000 that's worth checking out?
    Nope!




    J/K
    Steve F.

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    www.cuneiformrecords.com

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    Any time any one speaks to me about any musical project, the one absolute given is "it will not make big money". [tip of the hat to HK]

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

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    Here's a few:

    Echolyn - I find them a bit of a mixed bag, but their best work is excellent. A bit of Gentle Giant, a bit of jazz harmony, a bit of folk-rock, and a lot of sophisticated adult songwriting, but done with a wide-ranging prog aesthetic rather than the usual tightly-reined pop approach. Of their eight or so albums, many prefer ...As the World..., and it comes closest to old-school prog. I'm more fond of Mei - which consists of one epic 49-minute track - and The End is Beautiful; both have sad and troubled lyrics but those don't bother me.

    Discipline - A bit like Van deGraff Generator, but somewhat easier to listen to. The band has a more conventional guitar-bass-drums-keyboards lineup, and while Matthew Parmenter favors a dramatic delivery similar to VdGG's Peter Hamill, his singing voice is not such an acquired taste. Unfolded Like Staircase, which consists of four extended tracks, is usually considered their best, and it's very good.

    Deluge Grander - idiosyncratic, but good. They have four albums out, of which the first, second, and fourth are mostly or entirely instrumental; the third Heliotians, has vocals throughout but at this point is available only as a download (which, by downloading it as a WAV file and using iTunes, can be made into a CD.). The music both sounds like the old stuff and doesn't - Dan Britton, the composer/bandleader, has a distinctive compositional voice and is fond of frequent changes to remote keys.

  11. #11
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    If you are interested in instrumental prog there's some tremendous work out there. Future Kings of England, Djam Karet, Ephemeral Sun.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    Echolyn - I find them a bit of a mixed bag, but their best work is excellent. A bit of Gentle Giant, a bit of jazz harmony, a bit of folk-rock, and a lot of sophisticated adult songwriting, but done with a wide-ranging prog aesthetic rather than the usual tightly-reined pop approach. Of their eight or so albums, many prefer ...As the World..., and it comes closest to old-school prog. I'm more fond of Mei - which consists of one epic 49-minute track - and The End is Beautiful; both have sad and troubled lyrics but those don't bother me.
    I think that The End Is Beautiful is by far their best work. Funny, I didn’t really care for the Window Album, but this one is fantastic. As the World has some of their finest tunes, but I kind of overplayed it, and I wouldn’t use it to introduce someone to them, as those 90s digital synths are pretty gnarly. TEIB sticks mainly to piano and organ and has a more timeless sound.

    Discipline - A bit like Van deGraff Generator, but somewhat easier to listen to. The band has a more conventional guitar-bass-drums-keyboards lineup, and while Matthew Parmenter favors a dramatic delivery similar to VdGG's Peter Hamill, his singing voice is not such an acquired taste. Unfolded Like Staircase, which consists of four extended tracks, is usually considered their best, and it's very good.
    I think that their newest one, Captives of the Wine Dark Sea, is their best by a score of miles. Their last one (whose title escapes me) did nothing for me, and I found ULS to be embarrassingly derivative. COTWDS is a much more mature work.

    Deluge Grander - idiosyncratic, but good. They have four albums out, of which the first, second, and fourth are mostly or entirely instrumental; the third Heliotians, has vocals throughout but at this point is available only as a download (which, by downloading it as a WAV file and using iTunes, can be made into a CD.). The music both sounds like the old stuff and doesn't - Dan Britton, the composer/bandleader, has a distinctive compositional voice and is fond of frequent changes to remote keys.
    If you like them, also try Dan Britton’s other band, Birds and Buildings. They’re cut from the same cloth and should appeal to the same audience. Well, at least I really like both bands!
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

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    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Whatever you do, don't listen to Cardiacs. They are just terrible, Nonsense noise with no direction and the bass player can't even afford to buy trousers, so we have to watch him play in his dirty grundies.
    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

    "And it's only the giving
    That makes you what you are" - Ian Anderson

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    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    Funny, I didn’t really care for the Window Album....
    Neither did I. It was too consistent: the songs all sound very much like one another, which is pretty much the way it's done in mainstream pop/rock but not in prog.

    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    I found ULS to be embarrassingly derivative.
    Of who? VDGG?

    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Whatever you do, don't listen to Cardiacs. They are just terrible, Nonsense noise with no direction and the bass player can't even afford to buy trousers, so we have to watch him play in his dirty grundies.
    Or go ahead and listen to them. Halfway between New Wave and prog, disjointed, cartoonish, and rackety, with acquired-taste vocals. But some great songwriting, and a really individual musical voice.

  15. #15
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    If you are interested in instrumental prog there's some tremendous work out there. Future Kings of England, Djam Karet, Ephemeral Sun.
    These are excellent recommendations.
    Ian

    Gordon Haskell - "You've got to keep the groove in your head and play a load of bollocks instead"
    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    Of who? VDGG?
    Well, right out of the gate there are blatant rip-offs of riffs from “Outer Limits” (IQ) and “Darkness 11/11”
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  17. #17
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    To the OP: If you like 70s Prog-Rock, but would like a more modern take on it, I highly recommend Doomsday Afternoon by Phideaux. If you like that one, pick up the 2 albums that followed it. Then work your way backwards and stop when you stop liking them.

  18. #18
    Estimated Prophet notallwhowander's Avatar
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    I'll pitch out my standard from the past three years:

    Wolf People - Fain

    It's an outstanding album. Check this out.

    I'm not sure if the other stuff I've been digging is up your alley. But, if you want to take a trip...

    Lamagaia

    Causa Sui

    Djam Karet

    Setna

    This largely sums up my headspace. Enjoy!
    Wake up to find out that you are the eyes of the world.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by notallwhowander View Post
    I'm not sure if the other stuff I've been digging is up your alley. But, if you want to take a trip...

    Lamagaia

    Causa Sui

    Djam Karet

    Setna

    This largely sums up my headspace. Enjoy!
    I can definitely second the Causa Sui and Setna recommendations. Really nice stuff.

    Haven't heard the others, so I'm gonna have to check those out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by notallwhowander View Post
    I'll pitch out my standard from the past three years:

    Wolf People - Fain

    It's an outstanding album. Check this out.
    Good, but more psych than prog. Which doesn't mean you won't like it. Rather similar to Dungen, but without the flute, fiddle, or keyboards, and the vocals are in English.

  21. #21
    Hello there! I was at the exactly same position like you a couple of years ago - missing almost everything from 90's and beyond. So, for a start I would suggest things that are closer to the Big Guns of the 70's.
    Scandinavia: Anglagard, Anekdoten, Wobbler
    Italy: La Maschera di Cera
    US: Discipline, Echolyn, Deluge Grander

    If you want a fresher approach to the genre, try Knifeworld.

    Have a nice ride!

  22. #22
    Member thedunno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    Hello there! I was at the exactly same position like you a couple of years ago - missing almost everything from 90's and beyond. So, for a start I would suggest things that are closer to the Big Guns of the 70's.
    Scandinavia: Anglagard, Anekdoten, Wobbler
    Italy: La Maschera di Cera
    US: Discipline, Echolyn, Deluge Grander

    If you want a fresher approach to the genre, try Knifeworld.

    Have a nice ride!
    All good suggestions. I would add:
    Spain: Kotebel

  23. #23

  24. #24
    Anglagard
    Riverside
    7 for 4
    Enjoy the moment... It's the only way to fly!

  25. #25
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    Judging by the bands you mentioned it sounds like you are in the same boat I was in ten years ago when I "rediscovered" my love of Prog.

    These are the bands that jump-started the process:

    The Flower Kings (and all things Roine Stolt - The Tangent, Karmakanic, Agents Of Mercy, Kaipa, Anderson/Stolt)
    Anglagard
    Spock's Beard (and all things Neal Morse - Transatlantic, Neal Morse Band, Flying Colors)
    Wobbler
    Magenta
    Big Big Train
    Discipline
    Echolyn
    Anekdoten
    Moon Safari


    All the above should appeal to someone longing for that 70's magic!!!
    Last edited by miamiscot; 12-08-2017 at 12:10 PM.
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