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Thread: Prog TV Shows or Documentaries

  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Back in the 80s there was a documentary about prog rock on MTV which was basically a long interview with Ian Anderson, about prog in general. Not with Rick Wakeman. I used to have it on VHS and watched it often, but I can't remember the title or find it on YouTube.

    EDIT: Found a promo for it, but not the full show - the series was called Rock Influences:
    Might still have a copy of the Prog rock episode on video. Spandau Ballet ain't prog. No one who's Prog does a song as lame as True.

    Ok, maybe overstepped there as I don't know their output, but True is a totally lame. And some great Prog acts have had rather lame songs but if Spandau is Prog then I don't know what Prog is.

    Of course, 23 minutes only affords someone so much time to explore a very deep subject. It was Ian Anderson interviewed about it but they totally missed the mark on that episode.
    Carry On My Blood-Ejaculating Son - JKL2000

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by TheLoony View Post
    Might still have a copy of the Prog rock episode on video. Spandau Ballet ain't prog. No one who's Prog does a song as lame as True.

    Ok, maybe overstepped there as I don't know their output, but True is a totally lame. And some great Prog acts have had rather lame songs but if Spandau is Prog then I don't know what Prog is.
    Well, as time goes on we can often look back on bands with more forgiving eyes.

    But not Spandau Ballet.

  3. #53
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    In early 1970 a 60-minute show aired on network TV called "Switched on Symphony" hosted by Zubin Mehta. It featured the Nice, Jerry Goodman from the Flock, Santana, Jethro Tull, and others. I remember enjoying it very much. Each performer played a number (the Nice played "Country Pie" if I remember correctly) and chatted with Zubin. At the end, the performers got together with Santana to play "Soul Sacrifice." I've been looking for video copy of this for years. I guess the licensing has doomed that prospect.
    Lou

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  4. #54
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    Hey Lou! Thanks for that memory! I saw this program although I don't recall Jerry Goodman's participation. I had recorded the audio to cassette with an unsophisticated recorder, but the tape has not survived. I have never encountered the program since. There was another early TV program possibly mentioned earlier in this or some other PE thread that somewhat fits into this topic. The New York Rock and Roll Ensemble (with future film music composers Michael Kamen and Mark Snow) were featured on a Leonard Bernstein's Young People's Concert program in 1968 which I also saw. The group "performed their signature song "Brandenburg", based on the first movement of Bach's Fifth Brandenburg Concerto. This track showed the group at their best, starting off as a straight rendition featuring two oboes, guitar and cello, then transitioning into a rock tune, while continuing to use Bach's musical foundation" (quote from wiki). Proto or quasi prog at the least (for 1968). I was suitably impressed by all of these. Great stuff at the time for major steps in my musical appreciation formative development.

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