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Thread: Melody Makers new documentary

  1. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    I swapped from MM to sounds around 1979/80 - MM was always a musician's paper, & its heart just wasn't in the deconstruction of music that the punks & post-punks were about. NME was never really about the music - always more about the attitude. Sounds somehow managed to find ways to embrace music from all fronts, whether it be reggae with Edwin Pouncey, post-punk with Dave McCullough, "oi" with Gary Bushell or NWBHM with Deaf Barton. And then there were characters like John Gill, who loved solo Hammill in that glorious period of his from The Future Now, via Black Box, to the K Band.
    Hugh Fielder and Mick Wall were another OK couple of writers on Sounds, not afraid to admit to liking prog or old-school rock.

    McCullough was a right miserabilist sod. They gave him 'The Wall' album to review, IIRC; that went down well. Barton could be a total bellend at times as well.

  2. #27
    Good shout about Hugh Fielder, Halmyre - he was a decent writer.

    McCullough was the nearest thing Sounds had to the NME house style of writer. He certainly had that bleak Northern Irish miserablist thing down to a fine art...but when he liked a band, he could rave with the best of them.

    Going back to Henry's excellent opening post - it's hard to convey just how central to the whole music business these weeklies were. They were the main source of information about bands, about record releases & live dates, &, of course, reviews. They really helped to shape musical movements. Getting them each week was always a real event.

  3. #28
    I read lots of magazines in the late sixties, early seventies: Hit Parader, Rolling Stone, Creem, Crawdaddy, Zoo World. Jon Tiven had a regular column about the latest import records in Zoo World and I once wrote him asking to recommend a good British publication. He wrote back, saying he suggested NME, which had, as I remember, even a literary style. He was right! I subscribed and learned to love the NME with its arrogant sarcastic and passionate style through most of the Seventies. They did embrace their nickname , 'The Enemy', supposedly coined by musicians alluding to the paper's antagonistic and sometimes confrontational style. I did occasionally read MM, but it seemed too arid by comparizon.

  4. #29
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    I had a subscription to MM from about '70 to '73. It came by boat, so it was a month late. But it arrived every week!
    Hell, they ain't even old-timey ! - Homer Stokes

  5. #30
    I'm in Puerto Rico and my original subscription to NME ran out in 1974, when the paper apparently was at its peak an d, if I remember correctly, sold over 400,000 co-pies each week. When I tried to renew, I was told -by mail, of course- that the NME no longer accepted subscriptions from overseas. It had something to do with the oil crisis, don't ask me what. I felt miserable then, feeling condemned to rely on Rolling Stone and the like to satisfy my musical fix. Of course when NME was available for overseas subscriptions in a couple of years the paper had taken in my opinion an irrevocable downwards spin, as it embraced every punk, post punk and new wave band that came along and increasingly featured writers as vociferous superstars, a la Julie Burchill. Of course, NME is nowdays the only survivor of that whole era of British music weeklies, but available only on the net.

  6. #31
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mogrooves View Post
    I had a subscription to MM from about '70 to '73. It came by boat, so it was a month late. But it arrived every week!
    ...and it was available for a while in the early-ish 70s in an American version, presumably published there.
    Hell, they ain't even old-timey ! - Homer Stokes

  7. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by mogrooves View Post
    ...and it was available for a while in the early-ish 70s in an American version, presumably published there.
    As discussed in the documentary.

    Henry
    Where Are They Now? Yes news: http://www.bondegezou.co.uk/wh_now.htm
    Blogdegezou, the accompanying blog: http://bondegezou.blogspot.com/

  8. #33
    Member mnprogger's Avatar
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    bump.

    it's finally coming out on November 29th.

    https://deadline.com/2019/08/warner-...medium=twitter

    "Melody Makers, slated to open shortly after on Nov. 29.

    Melody Makers, directed and produced by Canadian filmmaker Leslie Ann Coles, chronicles the birth of music journalism and the world’s oldest and longest-standing seminal music magazine; Melody Maker. It tells the true story of the rise and fall of the world’s most influential music publication and uncovers an era of tremendous creative freedom. At the heart of the story is Barrie Wentzell, Chief Contributing Photographer of Melody Maker Magazine (1965-1975) and his iconic photographic archive of legendary musicians during the birth of the rock n roll era. Perera and Yasui made the deal with Ava B from The House of Film repping the filmmakers."

  9. #34

  10. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by mnprogger View Post
    ... I'd love to see the Rachel Flowers documentary as well which I don't believe has shown up on Netflix or Redbox, On Demand, or any of my local Independent cinemas yet.
    It's on Amazon

  11. #36
    Member mnprogger's Avatar
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    Melody Makers is also on Amazon Prime now.

    lot of good stories, although not incredibly cohesive. Still, there's more than enough stories shared to check it out.

    https://www.amazon.com/Melody-Makers.../dp/B07Z8FRH8R

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