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Thread: Cheer Accident

  1. #26
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    ^^^^^^

    Michael,

    I purposely left off their cassette only release...
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "The older I get, the more I realize that cynicism is just realism spelled wrong."

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  2. #27
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    The D.C. gig was great (albeit tightly jammed into a little room with a inadequate PA) but ultimately I think the music came through.

    ALSO:

    We have a limited quantity of vinyl of their new release, Putting Off Death, which was made for the band to sell on tour, but which we snabbed some of off the top.

    Unless you go see them, this is one of the few ways to buy it.

    Here!
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "The older I get, the more I realize that cynicism is just realism spelled wrong."

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  3. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    Someone told me I would like this record, so I borrowed it and gave it a listen... The prog rock influence is pretty obvious, but there are plenty of prog rock bands out there, and a lot of them are better than these guys. The problem with this record is that it is too long and, much like a hot dog, has very little meat and a lot of filler. [...] These guys are like prog rock that "jams econo". No mellotrons or fat analog synths. It's prog rock played indie style. This just does not work for me.

    I'm really surprised Steve Albini recorded this. It doesn't sound as good as what usually comes out of his studio. Then again, garbage in, garbage out... If you record bad sounding instruments, they will sound bad no matter who records it. It sounds like it was dubbed on some lossy digital device. You can definately hear digital compression artifacts when listening on monitors.

    I too long for the days of the 70's, but not many of today's artists are up to snuff. One main reason is that no one will appreciate the hard work, and it definately doesn't pay off. But excuses don't make for good music. I'd much rather beef up my collection of great, original 70's progressive rock

    Todd Grady
    Amazing, yet not unique or outstanding at all - in fact, rather typical and symptomatic for reviewers trying their hand at products somehow breaching their own frame of reference. Which is essentially ALL this is. Poor Todd appears to know as little about receiving music as he does about communicating perceptions of it, which should be telling but instead comes across as simply predictable.

    Would you argue against a movie by Werner Herzog or Theo Angelopoulos that there are too few fistfights or car-chases - and then expect to be taken seriously?

    Yupz, those mid-sections of the beginning and ending 20-minute tunes on Introducing Lemon are excessive in duration. They're also just very... Strange. What could be the reason for this, the intent, the possible message - or the lack of such? Does it matter? If it doesn't then how explain one's own perception of specific "boredom" on listening?

    You suspend disbelief, as this only goes to expose eventual limitations through prejudice; the work at hand is what you're supposed to discern - that is, your varying levels of experience in its immersion. As such, Introducing Lemon is frustrating as hell - but almost to the degree of a certain catharsis. Job well done.
    Last edited by Scrotum Scissor; 06-27-2017 at 06:56 AM.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  4. #29
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    ^ ^ ^ ^

    I like the way you made it look like *I* had originally said all that!
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "The older I get, the more I realize that cynicism is just realism spelled wrong."

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  5. #30
    ^ Yes, ol' uncle Steve ain't know no shit!
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  6. #31


    The show Saturday was really really great, despite the totally-fried PA system. Super intimate, and the material from Putting Off Death came off really well. Not 100% sure but I might've even caught a tribute to 4'33" at one point

    Bonus: of the two openers, one was really rather fun. A one-woman act with heavy guitar, flute and some vocals. She called herself Floom (Flute + Doom). Very entertaining, shades of Chelsea Wolfe and Swans among other things.
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  7. #32
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    The show Saturday was really really great, despite the totally-fried PA system.
    Only blotch on the show.

    Maybe they can raise some money and get a better set up....
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "The older I get, the more I realize that cynicism is just realism spelled wrong."

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  8. #33
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    Not 100% sure but I might've even caught a tribute to 4'33" at one point
    4'33" + charades!
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "The older I get, the more I realize that cynicism is just realism spelled wrong."

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  9. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    Only blotch on the show.

    Maybe they can raise some money and get a better set up....
    It's a cool little place so yeah, that would be a very big help...
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  10. #35
    ^ But John, did they have mellotrons and fat analog synths? I think it's very important that a band has mellotrons and fat analog synths, 'cause that's what I'm used to having myself - and for me to like something it'd better oblige my customs and established habitus so that things fit in with what I'm used to from before. So, what mellotrons and analog synths did they have?
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  11. #36
    The mid-section of Autumn Wind is a Pirate is simply astounding, and exactly because of its duration. It appears initially like an involuntary memory, in the midst of madness, like a beautiful snapshot of childhood, but it doesn't settle right in. Even when it does settle, there is always the impression that it might disappear, there's a menacing guitar chord that suggests all hell could break loose at any time. But no, the band seems to cling to it for as long as they are allowed to, until the melody fades, reappears, and finally admits defeat to previous demons. Sorry if I am being too poetic for some, but the way this is concieved and executed is just uniquely beautiful.

  12. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    ^ But John, did they have mellotrons and fat analog synths? I think it's very important that a band has mellotrons and fat analog synths, 'cause that's what I'm used to having myself - and for me to like something it'd better oblige my customs and established habitus so that things fit in with what I'm used to from before. So, what mellotrons and analog synths did they have?
    Oh, it was nothing but!!!

    See...it wasn't obvious until I went upstairs to use the restroom, but due to the cramped quarters the band had to put all seven mellotrons and the Emerson Tribute Big Moog in one of the upstairs bedrooms, and had CV cables running upstairs so they could trigger them from the stage area downstairs (I asked the drummer if they'd considered using MIDI instead of CV and he said to get off his lawn, and get a haircut).

    I'm pretty sure the reason the PA was so badly fried was because they were trying to run all those top-shelf vintage nuggets of aural perfection on the same circuit as their 17 fog machines and vari-lights. That's probably also why they disappointed us by playing their original material, rather than doing a Genesis tribute set as was expected...if you can't keep that Watchers intro in tune, just give it up man
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  13. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    The mid-section of Autumn Wind is a Pirate is simply astounding, and exactly because of its duration. It appears initially like an involuntary memory, in the midst of madness, like a beautiful snapshot of childhood, but it doesn't settle right in. Even when it does settle, there is always the impression that it might disappear, there's a menacing guitar chord that suggests all hell could break loose at any time. But no, the band seems to cling to it for as long as they are allowed to, until the melody fades, reappears, and finally admits defeat to previous demons. Sorry if I am being too poetic for some, but the way this is concieved and executed is just uniquely beautiful.
    That's waaaay too poetic, man.

    No, seriously; I like it myself as well. But my point was that the frustration of duration (See? I too can poetisize ) has a given point of being just that - so as to figure out that very point. This is something C-A are rather well known for; prompting questions as to "why/what du hell...?"

    As for the other lengthy track, "Find", the middle section of that one bears the mark of Thymme J.'s acquaintance with the Gastr del Sol folks and his (then) recent collab in Brise-Glace. It's a whim, not in execution but concept - to contemplate on a tiny idea for nearly ten minutes. And the age of post-rock actually allows for it; let the listener and his/her merits judge its valor in the end. I tend to enjoy it on hearing.

    For something as epic but all the more opposite in substance still, one could check out the title track from Salad Days!, which was the first C-A I bought back in 2000 (by Steve F.); that thing moves in so many layers and quarters of thematic syntaz and dissonance you'd hardly believe it - like a bastardian Soft Machine-meets-Krimso-joining-kraut. Extraordinary, but a highly challenging listen.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  14. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    Oh, it was nothing but!
    Just by all means don't forget how Mr. J. Bender went laughing from Magma's support slot for Porky Tree and later designated Tatsuya Yoshida an "obscure drummer worse than the one in the Muppet Show" while proceeding to contemplate highbrow originality while enjoying gigs by The Musical Box and IQ. I mean, primal logics don't have to meet coherence at all; it's simply up to what you make of it yourself.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  15. #40
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    I mean, primal logics don't have to meet coherence at all; it's simply up to what you make of it yourself.
    Welcome to the New America. That is now more widespread here than amber waves of grain.

  16. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Just by all means don't forget how Mr. J. Bender went laughing from Magma's support slot for Porky Tree and later designated Tatsuya Yoshida an "obscure drummer worse than the one in the Muppet Show" while proceeding to contemplate highbrow originality while enjoying gigs by The Musical Box and IQ. I mean, primal logics don't have to meet coherence at all; it's simply up to what you make of it yourself.
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  17. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    That's waaaay too poetic, man.

    No, seriously; I like it myself as well. But my point was that the frustration of duration (See? I too can poetisize ) has a given point of being just that - so as to figure out that very point. This is something C-A are rather well known for; prompting questions as to "why/what du hell...?"

    As for the other lengthy track, "Find", the middle section of that one bears the mark of Thymme J.'s acquaintance with the Gastr del Sol folks and his (then) recent collab in Brise-Glace. It's a whim, not in execution but concept - to contemplate on a tiny idea for nearly ten minutes. And the age of post-rock actually allows for it; let the listener and his/her merits judge its valor in the end. I tend to enjoy it on hearing.

    For something as epic but all the more opposite in substance still, one could check out the title track from Salad Days!, which was the first C-A I bought back in 2000 (by Steve F.); that thing moves in so many layers and quarters of thematic syntaz and dissonance you'd hardly believe it - like a bastardian Soft Machine-meets-Krimso-joining-kraut. Extraordinary, but a highly challenging listen.
    First of all, thanks for the suggestion of Salad Days, it sure comes handy since I am very new to the band and they do have a giant discography behind (I have it on my earphones right now...)

    Also the relation with the post-rock age explains a lot, the middle section we're talking about reminded me instantly of stuff like Tortoise, Sea & Cake etc.

    If I understand correctly your argument (it hasn't been that easy...) the middle section does not necessarily stand for something else except itself. And I agree with that. I am also not averse to that, in terms of taste. In fact I like it.

    Other readings are also possible of course. And I am not using the word "readings" in vain. There are people that suggested that the songs in their latest record work stronger in the context of the LP than on their own. Titles can also be very important. "Language Is" ends on pure noise. Maybe noise for itself, maybe not. Whimsical, self-referential or not, this music resembles a literary text in more than one ways. In my humble opinion of course, and with fewer listens/reads or knowledge of the history of the band that could give my opinion more confidence.

  18. #43
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    ^ ^ ^

    FYI - I find "Salad Days" to be one of their most inaccessible to me albums; it's one of my personal least favorites.
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "The older I get, the more I realize that cynicism is just realism spelled wrong."

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  19. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    If I understand correctly your argument (it hasn't been that easy...) the middle section does not necessarily stand for something else except itself. And I agree with that. I am also not averse to that, in terms of taste. In fact I like it.
    Precisely. It's neither ambitious nor pretentious - hell, it isn't even pure Zen. Well, maybe just a tad mindfulness involved...

    But I'd agree with Steve about Salad Days!, though; it's altogether one of their least forgiving albums. Which of course makes it perfect how I actually started with that one. I then got the (internally) infamous Neat Meat-release of Dumb Ask, their second CD, which is essentially a post-hardcore/noise/math-rock tour-de-force and very hard on the ear - yet still I was sufficiently intrigued to continue on the band. When I got Enduring the American Dream (their first double album) from '97, I was completely sold; it's got the goofy spoofs (such as the 8-minute opening track with Alex Perkolup stepping on/off a vacuum cleaner for rhythmic drone), the piano pop ballads, the grand "prog-scope" songs, some silly tunes and arrangements etc. I think I've must have listened it half to death in the summer of 2005, during some intense holiday weeks in which I basically lived on beer while accomodating on my best bud's houseboat; the summer ended with my kidney bursting due to a fall on the seaside rocks, btw.

    I got hold of everything I could find by them after that. I'm not insane about Not a Food or Salad Days!, and I never heard either Trading Balloons or Vasectomy (both CD-Rs, I believe), and I'm still missing the second volume of the Goddamn Old Man series as well as their cartoon-album for the Skin Graft label, Gumballhead the Cat. I'll probably be picking those up if I ever find them, though.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  20. #45
    Member Steve F.'s Avatar
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    I recently bought Gumballhead The Cat. Played it once, don't remember anything about it except I have not yet heard it a second time....
    Steve F.

    www.waysidemusic.com
    www.cuneiformrecords.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    "You run a great label, but sometimes you go out of your way to be a jerk." - Jed Levin

    "The older I get, the more I realize that cynicism is just realism spelled wrong."

    "Death to false 'support the scene' prog!"

    please add 'imo' wherever you like, to avoid offending those easily offended.

  21. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    p.s.

    apropos of nothing except amusing myself, I found the following review of Introducing Lemon on Amazon, including the also amusing response.

    Kinda a proto-Skullhead thingy happening here, baby.

    ----
    Someone told me I would like this record, so I borrowed it and gave it a listen... The prog rock influence is pretty obvious, but there are plenty of prog rock bands out there, and a lot of them are better than these guys.

    The problem with this record is that it is too long and, much like a hot dog, has very little meat and a lot of filler.

    I liked the first 5 minutes or so, then it lost me on a repetitive acoustic guitar hootenanny. There are about 20 minutes of really great music on a CD that is about 70+ minutes long.

    These guys are like prog rock that "jams econo". No mellotrons or fat analog synths. It's prog rock played indie style. This just does not work for me.

    I'm really surprised Steve Albini recorded this. It doesn't sound as good as what usually comes out of his studio. Then again, garbage in, garbage out... If you record bad sounding instruments, they will sound bad no matter who records it. It sounds like it was dubbed on some lossy digital device. You can definately hear digital compression artifacts when listening on monitors.

    I too long for the days of the 70's, but not many of today's artists are up to snuff. One main reason is that no one will appreciate the hard work, and it definately doesn't pay off. But excuses don't make for good music. I'd much rather beef up my collection of great, original 70's progressive rock than hear an above-average attempt to expand on this sound.

    20 minutes of this record are really amazing. The rest is boring. The problem is, the 20 minutes are spread across multiple tracks. So you can't just skip the wonder bread. You have to eat the whole sandwich.
    Todd Grady

    ----

    I've noticed several things wrong here.

    1. Your only reviews are two-star reviews of Cheer-Accident records. This makes it seem like you hold a grudge against the band, which would explain some of your idiotic comments.

    2. Not all prog has to have "mellotrons or fat analog synths". I guess I can understand why you dislike this band if you base your idea of prog-rock after dinosaurian 70s cliches.

    3. At least 50 minutes of this record are great. Each of the 20-minute-plus epics on this record are about 70% great (marred by overly-long middle sections, I'll admit) plus there's "Smile" and
    "The Day After I Never Met You", two fantastic prog-pop tunes.

    4. Also, the comment "you can't just skip the wonder bread. You have to eat the whole sandwich" seems to miss the point of the record. This isn't a pop record, with a few catchy 3-minute singles you can skip to and ignore the rest of the record. This is a double album. You are supposed to digest the whole thing- it's part of the listening experience. As a supposed prog fan, you oughta know this, man.

    5. This record sounds great. There are no "digital compression artifacts"- I've listened to this record on top-notch headphones used for recording purposes, and it sounds as analog as anything else Albini's done. And the comment about the instruments sounding bad- how so? They're tuned well, and they aren't cheap garage-sale First Act brand crapola either. Are you insinuating that these guys don't play well? Because that's utterly absurd. Thymme Jones alone has enough talent for a dozen bands.

    In conclusion, learn how to have a modicum of intelligence before you post any reviews, or you will wind up frustrating anyone who actually knows anything about music. Thanks!
    Dirk Funk
    Classic review and commentary. Gotta love reviewers
    And the code is a play, a play is a song, a song is a film, a film is a dance...

  22. #47
    Member Lebofsky's Avatar
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    That middle section of Autumn Wind is the perfect length. There. Now you also have my opinion on the matter.

    - Matt

  23. #48
    Member progholio's Avatar
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    I saw them last Saturday along with Yowie and Pat Sajak Assassins, fantastic night with all 3 bands.

    This was my 4th time to see CA and i think it was the best so far, absolutely riveting from start to finish. Like Michael said earlier you don't know what to expect and this was surely the case.

    I did grab Putting Off Death on vinyl, curious to know if there is a digital download available. The album is not packaged in cellophane which Thymme says it's ready to go right on the turntable this way, i appreciate the convenience.

    I should also mention Yowie - they are a force to reckon with. It's pretty mind blowing to see 3 guys with instruments plugged straight into amps, no electronic gizmos or fluffery just destroy for duration of their set at breakneck speed and telepathic accuracy. I have a feeling if any one of these guys decided to leave the band then it's all over because there is no way anyone could jump in fill the spot. Something tells me these guys are on the rise.
    Last edited by progholio; 07-31-2017 at 12:26 PM.

  24. #49
    Traversing The Dream 100423's Avatar
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    The wife and I saw Cheer-Accident with Free Salamander Exhibit last night in Kansas City. Both bands were phenomenal and a lot of fun!

  25. #50
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    Been listening to Putting off Death for a few weeks.

    Like all Cheer-Accident recordings, it's deeply eccentric, sometimes has the air of a musical collage (although one made entirely from the collage artist's own drawings and paintings), uses brass where other bands would use synthesizers, and doesn't really sound like anyone else. Or try very hard to. While Jeff and Thymme can play their instruments fairly well, I suspect they have little or no training on them - either formally, or through the informal process of learning many covers. Instead, they sound as if from the beginning, Jeff and particularly Thymme concentrated on bringing the sounds they heard in their heads to life, and that's much of what they know how to play. The music that results has an unusual home-made quality.

    Which last description I can't really explain very well. It is certainly not primitive music, although it has primitive qualities and is the antithesis of slick. It has something in common with what is often called "outsider music", but that doesn't really describe it either - usually "outsider music" either sounds like an idiosyncratic take on roots music (as in Beefheart's version of the blues), or appallingly incompetent but with a few odd redeeming qualities, or like nothing else at all. In contrast to those, Cheer-Accident don't have much interest in conventionalized "roots", play quite decently, and you can sometimes hear similarities from them: For example, the first track on Putting off Death, "Language Is", starts with something resembling a Todd Rundgren piano ballad, then abruptly cuts to something completely different and a bit like ELP's "Three Fates". However, I suspect that it wasn't directly influenced by the music I likened it to, so much as being an unintentional parallel - Thymme Jones sat down, started playing his old upright piano, and that was what came out.

    Perhaps that's it: They do what they do; what comes out is what comes out; and whether it resembles anything else is of little importance - even if they might sometimes be trying to play their own interpretation of a particular style.
    Last edited by Baribrotzer; 08-01-2017 at 03:20 PM.

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