Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 182

Thread: The Show That Never Ends: The Rise and Fall of Prog Rock

  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay.Dee View Post
    “The King Crimson weapon is musical fascism, made by fascists, designed by fascists to dehumanize, to strip mankind of his dignity and soul. It’s pure Tavistock Institute material, financed by the Rothschild Zionists and promoted by two poncy public school boys with connections to the city of London.”
    While I always knew about Haskell's very obvious antipathies in dealing with his KC tasks, I wasn't actually aware what a complete doof we're talking of. Aligning the "fascist Rothschild Zionists" - Yeah, right indeed. For real. Even if we're talking pure "rhetorics" this simply neutralizes most other musicians' statements with any connection to the day and age in question.

    Lizard is one of my fave KC records. I'll have a harder time listening to that than I'll ever have enduring another Magma session, that's for sure.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Dana5140 View Post
    No, the Intro starts by discussing Cruise to the Edge, how some fans are old and fanatic, about how some bands are realizing that this is how to have an audience, about how some bands don't interact with their fans, and it sort of crosses into snarky and sarcastic a lot, and I do not get the feeling of respect for fans.
    Whenever someone complains about an artist not interacting with their fans, I take it to mean that the writer received a serious butthurt by said artist. Honestly, this is why I'd rather not have any contact with artists I enjoy -- what good could come from it? We'll become pals and hang out? I'll get to join the band? What's the point?
    No matter what anyone says, you are the decider of how you will listen to music.

  3. #53
    “The King Crimson weapon is musical fascism, made by fascists, designed by fascists to dehumanize, to strip mankind of his dignity and soul. It’s pure Tavistock Institute material, financed by the Rothschild Zionists and promoted by two poncy public school boys with connections to the city of London.”
    No toxic resentment there. I always hated his singing on the Crimson records. I thought he was terrible- about as bad as you could possibly get.
    I just saw some of his Harry's bar stuff. He's a better singer now, but still not interested.
    Last edited by arthurfrayn; 07-04-2017 at 11:37 PM.

  4. #54
    Honestly, this is why I'd rather not have any contact with artists I enjoy -- what good could come from it? We'll become pals and hang out? I'll get to join the band? What's the point?
    I go by the old adage: "Don't meet your heroes". I really don't want to find out they're assholes, or get insulted because they're having a bad day, or whatever. If I like what they do, I don't want it to be ruined by something that ultimately doesn't matter.

  5. #55
    The introduction, the part that describes the cruise, is very sweet, especially the ending. The author definitely has an affection for the music and the scene. He also seems to like to have some self-deprecating fun describing the music and listeners.

    I am just starting on the first chapter now...

  6. #56
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Portland, OR, USA
    Posts
    1,619
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Aligning the "fascist Rothschild Zionists" - Yeah, right indeed. For real. Even if we're talking pure "rhetorics" this simply neutralizes most other musicians' statements with any connection to the day and age in question.
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't that sort of guff a hobbyhorse of the European Far Left? Springing from taking the Palestinian side against the Israelis. And, because of its currency among academics of the Left, it verges on being considered intellectually respectable even though it is no more than a conspiracy theory. Here in the US, the Left is split or neutral on that issue, and regards such rhetoric with loathing. We only get it from the nuttiest of the Far Right - but it is disreputable even out there, and the non-crazy Right seem to be strongly pro-Israel.
    Last edited by Baribrotzer; 07-05-2017 at 09:20 AM.

  7. #57
    Member Jay.Dee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    378
    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't that sort of guff a hobbyhorse of the European Far Left? Springing from taking the Palestinian side against the Israelis.
    It is a very complex subject that would need a thorough analysis. Here is an interesting tackle with some thought-provoking comments from the readers:

    https://www.opendemocracy.net/north-...tive-from-left

  8. #58
    Member DoubleDrummer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Mid-South
    Posts
    136
    On my drive into work this morning (7/18/17) listening to NPR, I hear an interview of the author of this book and a discussion of his theory.
    I agree with the posts above that the author is a fan of prog and there is no critique of any one band (aside from one comment about MAGMA).
    The discussion is focused on the "tropes" and gripes (and praise) covering the culture and arrogance of the prog masters...........specifically mentioned is Fripp, Lake, and Waters.

    I can disagree with his notion that "the return of punk rock killed the prog movement in 1977/78"..................I have the opinion prog never died.
    The author claims that prog is alive today only in the writing of metal.

  9. #59
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    10,159
    Quote Originally Posted by Facelift View Post
    Just finished the book. There is no snark or damning with faint praise to speak of. The writer is a fan of progressive rock, but chose to approach the project more as a researcher than an advocate. To that end, there isn't much in the way of critical analysis, grand statements or editorializing. There are issues I have with the historical scope (very little space is given to the post-1980s) and the extent to which the genre survives today apart from the still-touring/recording remnants of the 1970s (the near-silence on the subject would indicate that he does not consider it to be of great importance). The worst that could be said about the book is that if you already know the details of progressive rock in the 1970s from the perspective of the major bands and know what happened to these bands after 1980, then the book probably would not have a lot of value.
    Does he make any reference to festivals like NEARfest?

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't that sort of guff a hobbyhorse of the European Far Left? Springing from taking the Palestinian side against the Israelis. And, because of its currency among academics of the Left, it verges on being considered intellectually respectable even though it is no more than a conspiracy theory.
    "Hobbyhorse of the European Far Left" - Yup, to some degree. Unfortunately, as it has significantly diminished not only the impact but the stature itself of leftist academic analysis of social-economics and cultural perspectives as extention. The lack of detailed casus insights as to severely intricate and allround challenging thought-matter in regard to already highly politicized areas of 'frontline' power issues has essentially blurred different levels of "acceptable" rhetoric, somehow merely exposing the apparent existential desperation and isolation of the "old new left". However, I don't think it'll ever be "intellectually respectable", I'm glad to utter. Not as long as scholars keep up their work in the fields of scientific theory and logics with relation to Humaniora, thus rendering a self-contained stigma to unserious academic traits and exercises.

    To be an academic in this field and have to hear this utter rubbish from a former musical hero of sorts - it doesn't help matters. Lizard is what it is, of course.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  11. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Does he make any reference to festivals like NEARfest?
    Yes. He attended NEARfest apocalypse.

  12. #62
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Mesa, Arizona
    Posts
    1,910
    Here's a short interview with the book's author.....

    Last edited by progmatist; 07-18-2017 at 03:50 PM.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  13. #63
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Burlington Twp, NJ
    Posts
    1,516
    This is the hour-long video of the book discussion/signing in NYC:


  14. #64
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Left Coast
    Posts
    1,523
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Roth View Post
    This is the hour-long video of the book discussion/signing in NYC:
    Thanks - quite entertaining. And I think I need to buy this book.
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  15. #65
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    East Linton, Scotland
    Posts
    349
    I know the old adage "Never judge a book by its cover", but the title feels off-kilter to me.

    Prog hasn't fallen, in fact, I think it's in pretty good health these days, judging by the threads and comments from everyone on Progressive Ears!

  16. #66
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Planet Lovetron
    Posts
    7,826
    Quote Originally Posted by Valen View Post
    Prog hasn't fallen, in fact, I think it's in pretty good health these days, judging by the threads and comments from everyone on Progressive Ears!
    Always remind yourself that PE is a self-contained tiny, tiny alternate universe. A niche within a niche. A pimple on the ass of nowhere. I love PE, but when you start thinking that it's truly representative of anything, you are on the road to error.

  17. #67
    Computer's, drum machines, digital editing software is what replaced human's performing complex rock, not punk or some other genre. Technology suddenly
    arrived on the scene and it opened the door for unskilled musicians to start making records and selling them to a generally unknowing public.

    Late 1970's arrival of digital technology into music, end of the era of hand crafted deeply articulated complex rock music.

  18. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by Valen View Post
    I know the old adage "Never judge a book by its cover", but the title feels off-kilter to me.

    Prog hasn't fallen, in fact, I think it's in pretty good health these days, judging by the threads and comments from everyone on Progressive Ears!
    As stated elsewhere, with regard to this book, the scope is progressive rock within the overall context of rock music. Although there are lots of active prog bands that don't sell many albums, the book is more or less about the ones that do/did. I personally agree that there could have easily been more in the book about the last 20 years, but other than Porcupine Tree and the legacy versions of the '70s bands (which he does cover) there isn't much else out there that was notable from a commercial standpoint.

  19. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by Skullhead View Post
    Computer's, drum machines, digital editing software is what replaced human's performing complex rock, not punk or some other genre. [...] Late 1970's arrival of digital technology into music, end of the era of hand crafted deeply articulated complex rock music.
    There are today dozens and dozens of artists composing and performing rock music of a complexity *far* beyond what was mustered by 70s bands. And even without "computer's". Many of these acts are discussed in here on a weekly basis.

    Athletes are performing harder now than what they did some 40 years ago as well. And not exclusively because of aschewed acceptance of prescription programs but of gradually intensified standards of training and medical knowledge as to bodily effects in variations of such.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  20. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    There are today dozens and dozens of artists composing and performing rock music of a complexity *far* beyond what was mustered by 70s bands. And even without "computer's". Many of these acts are discussed in here on a weekly basis.
    I agree with this, but because so much can be done with digital manipulation in the arts, it's just a given to most that things sound or look perfect with endless samples and digital editing options. It's the same thing with painters. Few care about handmade verses computer reproductions. No one cares.

    We used to have paintings and posters and the difference was clear. Now every digital artist is screaming at the top of their lungs for validation.
    Everyone and everyone that anyone knows is doing it. No one is impressed by true talent anymore, and no one gives a rats ass about traditions or authenticity. People pay $5 to see a band live and complain it's too expensive. They pay $5 to watch a cartoon avatar band playing in virtual reality or in "Second Life". Allan Holdsworth died broke having to borrow money to pay his hotel and cab ride to it.

    Style, taste and nuance are words soon to be removed from dictionaries. No one gets it, no one understands it, no one cares.

  21. #71
    Member Jay.Dee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    378
    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    Always remind yourself that PE is a self-contained tiny, tiny alternate universe. A niche within a niche. A pimple on the ass of nowhere. I love PE, but when you start thinking that it's truly representative of anything, you are on the road to error.
    Decimated and outnumbered we shall go on to the end. We shall never give up listening to progressive rock!


  22. #72
    Izzat ROOFIS??! ^
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  23. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Roth View Post
    This is the hour-long video of the book discussion/signing in NYC:





    introduced myself to Tom at the first Red Bank show the other week. HUGE Best Show fan (and Patreon member!) so it was a doubly awesome night
    2trevorsforlife

  24. #74
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    10,159
    Quote Originally Posted by helix View Post
    introduced myself to Tom at the first Red Bank show the other week. HUGE Best Show fan (and Patreon member!) so it was a doubly awesome night
    Never heard of the Best Show so I took a look at the website, etc. Does he have any Prog content? It it funny? Can't quite tell what his angle is without I guess listening to a couple of episodes.

  25. #75
    This article takes this discussion a step beyond: https://www.phaedrus.es/is-prog-alive-and-well/

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •