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Thread: Tell me more about Camel

  1. #51
    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vic2012 View Post
    The only thing I have by Camel is A Compact Compilation. It's pretty good. Haven't played it in 10 years or more. Agree that Andy is a hell of a guitar player. He reminds me of Carlos Santana in some ways.
    Wow, that one brings back memories. Back when CDs were still new, there were many bands that didn't have many available titles on CD. For Camel, I could only find that package and while I was glad to have SOMETHING on disc, it was frustrating not to have so many of the great Camel songs. I haven't listened to it in a long time because I have since purchased all of the single titles on CD.

    ...and fascinating comparo by the way; I do see some similarities between Andy and Carlos (the emphasis on perfect, individual notes and the rich tone).

  2. #52
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    I should look for that CD. It's been a while. Honestly never cared for the vocals much but the musicianship is really great.

  3. #53
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    In fact, I rather enjoy Andy's vocals. It's Camel to me.. Not to mention what a lovely and great guitar player he is . My eternal dream is for Camel to make another album.

  4. #54
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    That sleepy camel looks stoned.

    ...........

  5. #55
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    Found my Compact Compilation. Freefall is killer. NP: Lady Fantasy.

    Good music.

  6. #56
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    [QUOTE=Sturgeon's Lawyer;693674]Interesting. While I am very story-oriented, and I assume that there is a story to "The Snow Goose," I have no idea what it is. What I like about it, pretty much in order:
    1) The melodies
    2) The way it fits together as a musical whole despite its divergences and diversions - it is basically a very well done tone poem
    3) The best live integration of rock band and orchestra I have ever heard
    4) The musicality and musicianship

    Based on a novel of the same name... this link can tell you what it's about better than I could.

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/20...e-paul-gallico

  7. #57
    Estimated Prophet notallwhowander's Avatar
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    I pretty much read the book while listening to the album in one go. (It's really a storybook kind of thing.) The music really does capture the moods of the story. In one way it's a shame the original concept didn't pan out. Gallico demurred when he saw the Mirage cover - which was designed to look like a pack of cigarettes. On the other hand, the music isn't encumbered by anyone reading over it.

    Overall, I think it's a win.
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  8. #58
    I bought 'The Snow Goose' many years ago, and 'Mirage' just recently. Pleasant enough listening but I would sell these before I sold 'Land of Grey and Pink'.

  9. #59
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    I have always had a Meh...feel to Camel.
    When they were around, I found them too 'conventional' compared to lots of other bands around (GG, Focus, Hatfield, National Health, Caravan, etc.).
    This thread made me try to reconsider - apparently I have overlooked something - but I still dont get them. Best when Sinclair has some good basslines...
    My loss.

  10. #60
    I think Camel is one of the important prog bands of the 1970.s. I enjoy all their records until they started making crap records in the 80's like most bands did.

    I think they fall a bit short of Yes, ELP, Genesis, Tull, Crimson due to their obviously derivative overall musical palate. They clearly were trying to be one of those bands. They don't give the feeling that they invented the genre, or were taking it in a new and compelling direction. However, they were all very fine players, good compositions, solid live band and a must for any serious prog fan.

  11. #61
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    I think a case could be made that Camel was at least if not more influential on Japanese Prog than the big five Prog bands were. For what it's worth.

  12. #62
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    Andy played flute as well. Some Tullish sounding moments on that comp.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    Another thumbs down on Nude here.
    I regretfully have to agree. Man, I so wanted to love Nude but that 80's production ruins it for me.
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  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    I am going to throw out some love for latter day Camel. “Dust And Dreams”, “Harbour Of Tears”, and “Rajaz” are a great 3 album run that IMO ranks right up with their classics. ...
    Agree!.
    From time to time, I like to listen to these 3 and if I can in chronological order ... the better: they are favorites of the house !.

    Also, "Echoes: The Retrospective" (1993) had some rotation here back in the day.
    http://rateyourmusic.com/release/com...retrospective/

    "The Snow Goose" was my first introduction to Camel and the last time I heard it was about 15-20 years ago; it`s a gOOd effort IMO! (as I`m listening to it right now! )
    Last edited by TCC; 04-27-2017 at 03:51 PM.
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  15. #65
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    It occurred to me this morning while listening to A Live Record in the car, that a large part of what makes Camel different from Caravan for instance, and I'm surprised he hasn't been mentioned much or not at all in this thread, is Mel Collins. Camel has a jazzy sound, but it's a very different kind of jazzy from the sound of Caravan. I like Mel Collins a lot, but he has a SORT OF smooth jazz quality to his playing. Not that Camel sounds like smooth jazz -- fortunately the "vintage" sound quality on a lot of it saves it from that, but Mel Collins has a smooth way of playing usually. His playing and Latimer's sort of liquid sound soften everything.

    I like Nude, and I find that Mel Collins' playing on it gives it a sort of "last gasp of the 70s" quality. It has a few clunky bits, but overall it's good. If one hated the Allan Parson's Project though, they might not like Nude.
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  16. #66
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    Nude is my favourite Camel album. I don't hear the APP connection there but the following two albums, most definitely (there was a crossover of personnel).

  17. #67
    Forgive me if this has been said. "Ice" from "I Can See Your House from Here" is perhaps their most beautiful instrumental song if the album on which it resides isn't. A beautiful 10 minutes song.
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  18. #68
    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    It occurred to me this morning while listening to A Live Record in the car, that a large part of what makes Camel different from Caravan for instance, and I'm surprised he hasn't been mentioned much or not at all in this thread, is Mel Collins. Camel has a jazzy sound, but it's a very different kind of jazzy from the sound of Caravan. I like Mel Collins a lot, but he has a SORT OF smooth jazz quality to his playing. Not that Camel sounds like smooth jazz -- fortunately the "vintage" sound quality on a lot of it saves it from that, but Mel Collins has a smooth way of playing usually. His playing and Latimer's sort of liquid sound soften everything.

    I like Nude, and I find that Mel Collins' playing on it gives it a sort of "last gasp of the 70s" quality. It has a few clunky bits, but overall it's good. If one hated the Allan Parson's Project though, they might not like Nude.
    Mel Collins is the flute/sax Secret Sauce in so many fine albums by Camel, Crimson, Alan Parsons, Phil Manzanera, Bryan Ferry, Ant Phillips, Roger Waters, etc. He has so many skills and styles (for instance, he sounds so much more versatile than David Sanborn's work). As far as smooth jazz sounding, I'd have to say...huh? As a fan of most every genre, including (the terribly named) "smooth Jazz", I would say he is quite far from the standard sounds/licks in that genre.

    You are quite correct in observing that his name should have come up much earlier in this thread. He is a fine musician and apparently, a really nice guy.

    EDIT: I want to acknowledge that you DID say "sort of smooth jazz" and I think I now know what you mean. His tone is much "nicer" and yes, "smoother" than folks like Sanborn and Barbieri and Scott.
    Last edited by Gizmotron; 04-27-2017 at 03:28 PM. Reason: elaboration

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    Nude is my favourite Camel album. I don't hear the APP connection there but the following two albums, most definitely (there was a crossover of personnel).
    Nude and A Live Record are my two favorites. I'm 55 and have been into Camel since I was about 15 or so when I bought a
    used copy of the studio Snow Goose. Loved it, but when I got A Live Record, the energy of that album and the version of Snow Goose, blew away the studio version. You have to play A Live Record really loud, but it's an amazing album(both CD's).
    As far as Nude goes, I know that there is a little bit of an 80's production at times but it doesn't bother me and as far as the musicianship goes, I think it's superb! There's everything from mellow, sleepy ambient moods that perfectly fit the "deserted on an island" feel of the subject, there are intense workouts like on "Docks" and "Beached" and a lot of tasty guitar, bass, keyboards. To dismiss this album would be a big mistake. Other favorites are Moonmadness, Rain Dances, Breathless, Rajaz and Harbour of Tears.
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  20. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by Skullhead View Post
    I think Camel is one of the important prog bands of the 1970.s. I enjoy all their records until they started making crap records in the 80's like most bands did.

    I think they fall a bit short of Yes, ELP, Genesis, Tull, Crimson due to their obviously derivative overall musical palate. They clearly were trying to be one of those bands. They don't give the feeling that they invented the genre, or were taking it in a new and compelling direction. However, they were all very fine players, good compositions, solid live band and a must for any serious prog fan.
    Very well put

  21. #71
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    Camel were the first prog band I really got into after getting to know the Big 5. My introduction was "Lunar Sea". I just immediately grocked onto the warmth of their sound from that period, and to this day I think it's their defining characteristic. For some it's a very dated sound, and considering what else was going on when they made albums like Mirage or Moonmadness one could accuse them of being out of step with current trends. But for me that combination of Latimer's Santana/Beck-like guitar, Bardens' bluesy, organic Hammond and the Ferguson/Ward rhythm combo is like a soft, velvety zinfandel. Tasty, smooth, and leaves me with a gentle buzz every time.
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  22. #72
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulrus View Post
    Camel were the first prog band I really got into after getting to know the Big 5. My introduction was "Lunar Sea". I just immediately grocked onto the warmth of their sound from that period, and to this day I think it's their defining characteristic. For some it's a very dated sound, and considering what else was going on when they made albums like Mirage or Moonmadness one could accuse them of being out of step with current trends. But for me that combination of Latimer's Santana/Beck-like guitar, Bardens' bluesy, organic Hammond and the Ferguson/Ward rhythm combo is like a soft, velvety zinfandel. Tasty, smooth, and leaves me with a gentle buzz every time.
    It's always been comfort music for me.

  23. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by Paulrus View Post
    My introduction was "Lunar Sea"... considering what else was going on when they made albums like Mirage or Moonmadness one could accuse them of being out of step with current trends.
    "Current trends" as they were during the 19741976 time-frame in which those two albums were made consisted of many styles. Around the world, there were hundreds of musical acts exploring the jazz rock/Canterbury/space rock side of the spectrum, ala Camel. A few hours of random listening to instrumental music from 1976 will bring up various tracks in a similar vein to "Lunar Sea."

  24. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by miamiscot View Post
    I regretfully have to agree. Man, I so wanted to love Nude but that 80's production ruins it for me.
    As I said in another thread, I tried and tried with this one and eventually gave up. It so wants to be a Snow Goose for the 80s, but falls far short. The highlights are provided by Kit Watkins (“Docks”) and Jan Schelhaas (“Captured”), neither of whom was in the band anymore. The rest is a slurry of amorphous, un-dynamic ambient Muzak occasionally interrupted by mediocre pop songs. Andy seems to love “Drafted,” considering the many, many times it turns up in concert, but I don’t share that love.
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  25. #75
    Moderator Sean's Avatar
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    Camel have some of the best GROOVES!

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