Thread: SCOTCH Whisky Discussion

  1. #801
    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    I'm English, "not bad" is high praise indeed.

  2. #802
    Moderator Poisoned Youth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    I got to try that Ardbeg 5 year old wee beastie. Good one. Thanks for the recommendation.
    Excellent! I picked up an extra bottle myself.
    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    Just got a Glenlivet 15 aged in French oak barrels, not bad.
    I have a bottle of that myself. I like it, but it's not knocking me over. I prefer the 14 finished in Cognac casks so far I think.



    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    As for Livet, I'd say that it betters Fiddich by a margin, but it's obvious that it still tries to be its best competition, instead of being its own thing.

    Persnally, for a Speyside, my go-to is Aberlour, which really a "sure-thing", whether a basic 12 or the upper cousins 15/16/18, and the special series. Only the entry 8 is average.
    There is no Speyside that would crack my top 5 I don't think, but these would be my top 5 Speys (in no order)...


    Aultmore - I've had the 12, 18, and an IB. The 12 is the best bang for the buck. Sweet, honey, floral, light, fruity, hint of smoke.
    Craigellachie - Only had the 13 year, but this is a pretty solid smokey whisky for a Spey.
    Glenallachie - Climbing up the list. I have had the 12, 10 Port finish, and 10 cask strength. Fruity, floral, almost perfume like (in a good way).
    Glenfarclas - Had the 10, 12, 21, and 105. It's pretty much a one-trick pony, but love the berry quality to their sherry formula.
    Glenlivet - Love/hate relationship. I wish they did everything like their Nadurra series.

    Honorable mention
    Aberlour - I love A'bunadh, but seems like the quality is slowly slipping.
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  3. #803
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    I'll probably go with a Balvenie of those I've tried, always happy when I get a bottle.
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    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    I think Speyside malts (which is where my preference now lies) do tend to come into their own at 15 years - The Glenlivet, the Glenfarclas, Longmorn, Glen Grant, &, especially, the magisterial Linkwood, all show a marked step up in complexity & quality from their 10/12 year old incarnation to their 15 year old.
    Never even seen the Linkwood, but I've tried the others you mention, but only kept a sweet memory of Longmorn


    BTW, I neve bougth anything from those Dufftown bottlings, it doesn't inspire my trust.

    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    There is no Speyside that would crack my top 5 I don't think, but these would be my top 5 Speys (in no order)...


    Aultmore - I've had the 12, 18, and an IB. The 12 is the best bang for the buck. Sweet, honey, floral, light, fruity, hint of smoke.
    Craigellachie - Only had the 13 year, but this is a pretty solid smokey whisky for a Spey.
    Glenallachie - Climbing up the list. I have had the 12, 10 Port finish, and 10 cask strength. Fruity, floral, almost perfume like (in a good way).
    Glenfarclas - Had the 10, 12, 21, and 105. It's pretty much a one-trick pony, but love the berry quality to their sherry formula.
    Glenlivet - Love/hate relationship. I wish they did everything like their Nadurra series.

    Honorable mention
    Aberlour - I love A'bunadh, but seems like the quality is slowly slipping.
    Nah, I agree, I much prefer Highlands malts to Speyside, but Aberlour would probably rank in my brandname top 10. Aberlour is actually a generally excellent price/quality in Continental Europe, maybe because It's French-owned.

    But in general, I've pretty well stopped exploring the Speyside valley.

    I guess I should finish my A'bunadh and get a new one soon.
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  5. #805
    Interesting thoughts on Speyside.

    For me - & many traditionalists - Speyside is the spiritual (!) home of whisky. I think that, if your palate adapts to peaty Highland & island malts, then the Speysides can/will seem relatively lightweight or underwhelming. But, for my palate, the absence of the heavy peat/smoke means that the subtle complexity of the flavours is much more apparent.

    As for dismissing Glenfarclas as a one trick pony - for shame!!! Their 105 was the whisky the more or less began the cask strength "movement" (which is a marketing abomination, to my mind). But, the step up from the 10 to the 15 is stunning - the 15 is a magisterial whisky. The 21 & 25 are even better still. Amongst the very best whiskies of all.

    Linkwood is the main whisky in the Johnny Walker blend. It's hard to come upon it as a single malt. As a 10, it's raw & green. By the time it's aged to 15 years, some of its depth & complexity is beginning to really reveal itself, & the harshness of the 10 is rounding out. If you're ever lucky enough to drink it at 25 years, you will be drinking one of the absolute best whiskies. Ever. (The distillery, by the way, will celebrate its 200th anniversary next year)

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    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    As for dismissing Glenfarclas as a one trick pony - for shame!!! Their 105 was the whisky the more or less began the cask strength "movement" (which is a marketing abomination, to my mind). But, the step up from the 10 to the 15 is stunning - the 15 is a magisterial whisky. The 21 & 25 are even better still. Amongst the very best whiskies of all.
    Poor choice of words on my part. My intent was not to be dismissive, but more about the fact that they pretty much focus on one product and style.
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  7. #807
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    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    Their 105 was the whisky the more or less began the cask strength "movement" (which is a marketing abomination, to my mind).
    What are your thoughts on non-chill filtering and bottling whisky at 43-46% vs. good ol' 40% standard, chill filtration and (often) coloring?
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    All Things Must Pass spellbound's Avatar
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    Decided to try another island whisky. This time, Ledaig from the Isle of Mull. Very smoky and a touch of "medicinal" flavor. I don't know where the latter flavor comes from, as I wouldn't think it would be in barley malt, nor peat smoke, nor water. But it's not overwhelming and the whisky tastes great to me, just as it is. In case they make more than the one malt that is available here, to clarify: I got the 10 year old.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    Decided to try another island whisky. This time, Ledaig from the Isle of Mull. Very smoky and a touch of "medicinal" flavor. I don't know where the latter flavor comes from, as I wouldn't think it would be in barley malt, nor peat smoke, nor water. But it's not overwhelming and the whisky tastes great to me, just as it is. In case they make more than the one malt that is available here, to clarify: I got the 10 year old.
    Love Ledaig! We stayed at a castle last summer just outside of Tobermory on Mull where this Distillery is. One of the best places I have ever been to on planet Earth...utterly magical. They had Ledaig and Tobermory in the library along with about 20 other drams for free! Drink as much as you want overlooking the Atlantic and sheep grazing in multi-colored green pastures.

  10. #810
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    What are your thoughts on non-chill filtering and bottling whisky at 43-46% vs. good ol' 40% standard, chill filtration and (often) coloring?
    Sorry, Sean - I missed this when you first posted it...& then the thread went quiet.
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    They had Ledaig and Tobermory in the library along with about 20 other drams for free!
    Not quite library quiet, right enough

    I think good malts, & good ages, can take the extra alcohol - 46% is beginning to push it a little, but 44%, even 45%, is fine. I think the main thing is that the alcohol doesn't overwhelm the flavours of the whisky. If the whisky is still too young, or the alcohol is too strong, I think the tastes of the whisky become "muddy" (by contrast, as a whisky ages to full maturity, the clarity of the bouquet & of the flavours on the palate starts to increase, & the linger of the taste becomes more refined).

    I don't have strong feelings about chill filtration, one way or the other. As for colouring - I think it's pretty shabby. Let the casks do their work with the flavours & the colours (colouring is pure visual dressing up - of course, contemplating a good malt in a glencairn glass is an important part of the ritual of the dram drinking - but it has to be all about how the whisky smells, & then how it tastes!).

    Frank - in Edinburgh, one of the very, very, best bars is Kays, on the western edge of the New Town. It's got a grand selection of whiskies (& beers). And the wee back room is, indeed, The Library...

    rsz_1thelibrarysmall.jpg

  11. #811
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    Quote Originally Posted by spellbound View Post
    Decided to try another island whisky. This time, Ledaig from the Isle of Mull. Very smoky and a touch of "medicinal" flavor. I don't know where the latter flavor comes from, as I wouldn't think it would be in barley malt, nor peat smoke, nor water. But it's not overwhelming and the whisky tastes great to me, just as it is. In case they make more than the one malt that is available here, to clarify: I got the 10 year old.
    Didn't Ledaig only started expressing in the last 10 years again after some 40 or 50 being silent?

    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    I don't have strong feelings about chill filtration, one way or the other. As for colouring - I think it's pretty shabby. Let the casks do their work with the flavours & the colours (colouring is pure visual dressing up - of course, contemplating a good malt in a glencairn glass is an important part of the ritual of the dram drinking - but it has to be all about how the whisky smells, & then how it tastes!).
    TBH; I am a bit scandalised by the caramel colouring (or even worse some -whatever additive). I used to consider a dark single malt as richer and more complex than a lightly coloured one after a few years inside another (sherry/port) cask, but apparently there has been a lot of "cheating" , and I don't know for how long it's been going on.
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  12. #812
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Before indulging into a dram of Dalmore 15 yo, I went for a half-dram of the only bourbon I've owned for the last 20 years, and damn, that Bulleit Frontier is rather fine for the palate.
    Always surprised how sweet-tasting most of the bourbons or ryes are, but I'm glad I kept the Dalmore for last.

    ==============

    however, I found the amalgalm cork-plug soaked and difficult to extract. I chose to change it with a spare full-cork plug that I keep around in case of accident.
    Has anybody found the same phenomenum about these cork-plugs?
    Last edited by Trane; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:05 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    Before indulging into a dram of Dalmore 15 yo, I went for a half-dram of the only bourbon I've owned for the last 20 years, and damn, that Bulleit Frontier is rather fine for the palate.
    Always surprised how sweet-tasting most of the bourbons or ryes are, but I'm glad I kept the Dalmore for last.

    ==============

    however, I found the amalgalm cork-plug soaked and difficult to extract. I chose to changze it with a spare full-cork plug that I keep around in case of accident.
    Has anybody found the same phenomenum about these cork-plugs?
    YES!
    I am surprised how often a cork goes bad. I opened a NEW bottle the other day and the cork broke before I could get it out. Just to be fair to myself, I used to run a wine shop so I know a bit about corks and how to remove them.

  14. #814
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    One of my local booze purveyors recommended this, so I just had a dram. Not bad. A light bodied, floral taste. Sitting in front of a blazing fire pit, smoking my pipe, listening to a really good playlist. Happy Saturday to you all!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Sitting in front of a blazing fire pit, smoking my pipe, listening to a really good playlist.
    You don't have hair growing on the top of your large feet, do you?
    He did not know that the sword he'd hold, would turn his priceless empire into fool's gold...

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  16. #816
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    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    You don't have hair growing on the top of your large feet, do you?
    Only on the bottom. Of my feet, that is.

  17. #817
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    I hit (a bit too much) of my 57% cask strength Edradour Friday night, and I paid dearly all day yesterday. But it was amazing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    I hit (a bit too much) of my 57% cask strength Edradour Friday night, and I paid dearly all day yesterday. But it was amazing.
    Yum. I have an indie bottling of a CS Edradour that is indeed fantastic.
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  19. #819
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    I hit (a bit too much) of my 57% cask strength Edradour Friday night, and I paid dearly all day yesterday. But it was amazing.
    Edradour is such a pretty wee distillery...

    edradour-distillery-41.jpg 748.jpgpitlochry.jpg
    It's near Pitlochry, & by repute is both the smallest, & also the oldest farm, distillery. The area of Perthshire around Pitlochry is an amongst the most beautiful in Scotland - but it tends to be overlooked in the stampede to the Highlands.

    It's a long time since I've had a nip of the Edradour - I remember it being a very pleasant whisky. I'm interested to know what youse guys make of these rarer bottlings...

  20. #820
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Can liquor be ordered through the mail (or UPS, etc.) within the US? If so, any recommendations of online sellers?

    If not, it should be, especially in these unprecedented times when (in NY at least) you can get drinks to-go from bars and restaurants!

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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    I hit (a bit too much) of my 57% cask strength Edradour Friday night, and I paid dearly all day yesterday. But it was amazing.
    Ooh, sounds very good.
    I really like CS whiskies.

  22. #822
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    I've never even seen an Edradour of any stripe in the wild around here. They're nocturnal aren't they?

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    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    Edradour is such a pretty wee distillery...

    edradour-distillery-41.jpg 748.jpgpitlochry.jpg
    It's near Pitlochry, & by repute is both the smallest, & also the oldest farm, distillery. The area of Perthshire around Pitlochry is an amongst the most beautiful in Scotland - but it tends to be overlooked in the stampede to the Highlands.

    It's a long time since I've had a nip of the Edradour - I remember it being a very pleasant whisky. I'm interested to know what youse guys make of these rarer bottlings...
    I have never tasted this whiskey. I heard that whiskey is often counterfeited, although so far no counterfeits have come across. But might some exclusive drinks be counterfeited? By default, the whiskey must be Scotch and nothing else.

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