Thread: SCOTCH Whisky Discussion

  1. #726
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    Deanston is a definitely a distillery to watch. The whisky is all non-chill filtered and typically bottled at 46% or higher. The entry level is the "Virgin Oak" which tastes like an entry level, but is better than most at that price point. The 12 year is very solid and gets better as it goes. It's light, slightly fruity, sweet, and vanilla flavor from the ex-bourbon casks. That's pretty much their core range, but they have annual releases at higher ages and other limited releases.

    My Deanston "revelation" came when trying one of their specialty bottles. It was a 9 year Bordeaux cask matured expression bottled at cask strength. For a point of reference, imagine a red wine matured A'bunadh. It's amazing. They put out limited releases like this. I believe the most recent is the Fino Cask finish, which I'd love to try.
    Very tempting I must say (Still have a fifth of a bottle of A'bunach too)... Trying to cut down on the bottlesc I own, I am thinking of trying it at least once, if I can find it in liquor stores in the NL or at good spirits merchants in Belgium.
    The other brand I'd like ton try is GlenGoyne's 15 y.o which is hard to locate (the entry levels are everywhere, though)


    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    As a Scot, I can attest to the fact that Ralfy conforms to every dismal stereotype of Scottishness from which we have been trying to liberate ourselves for the last three or four decades.
    I can so understand that .... But this won't disappear unless the bagpipe players disappear from every downtown srtreet corner of Edimburg and Glasgow.
    BTW, I've never looked down on the screen to see if Ralfy is wearing a kilt or not while making an arse of himself (outside his Single Malt knowledge, that is)
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  2. #727
    I know, you're right, & with them all the shops selling tartan tat & tammies with ginger hair sticking out.

    By a sad coincidence, Alasdair Gray, the artist & writer who did more to begin the renaissance in Scottish culture, & who participated in last year's film Scotch: The Golden Dream, died a few days ago. His "motto" was "live as if you are in the first days of a better nation"...

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    Moderator Poisoned Youth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    As a Scot, I can attest to the fact that Ralfy conforms to every dismal stereotype of Scottishness from which we have been trying to liberate ourselves for the last three or four decades.
    Interesting. I think a lot of people here in the USA see Ralfy as having "clout" because he feels authentic. So you're kind of blowing my mind a bit here. What is it about Ralfy you find to be a "dismal stereotype"?


    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    Very tempting I must say (Still have a fifth of a bottle of A'bunach too)... Trying to cut down on the bottlesc I own, I am thinking of trying it at least once, if I can find it in liquor stores in the NL or at good spirits merchants in Belgium.
    The other brand I'd like ton try is GlenGoyne's 15 y.o which is hard to locate (the entry levels are everywhere, though)
    I have the 15 (it's the only GG I own). I think it's good, but it has not clicked with me like Glendronach, Edradour, Glenfarclas, and the like. If I get another bottle, it would be the CS.
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  4. #729
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    Interesting. I think a lot of people here in the USA see Ralfy as having "clout" because he feels authentic. So you're kind of blowing my mind a bit here. What is it about Ralfy you find to be a "dismal stereotype"?
    for me, it starts with the whole "in the bothy" schtick, & the bunnet. It's re-enacting a performance that was already being satirised by comedians like Rikki Fulton (who himself was pretty mainstream!) in the 1970s - the couthy wee Scotsman, getting one over on the big guys, & saving a penny or two into the bargain. He's about as authentic as tartan. There's also a lot of very dodgy stuff in the simplistic romanticising of a certain Highland history, which is a bit more difficult to work through here in a short post. But finally, for me, it's the whole pseudo-authority with scores nonsense - I've seen blokes like him cornering tourists at bars, selling them this whole Scottish schtick, playing up to stereotypes, blagging drinks - & most of all, being excruciatingly boring. These sorts of blokes have to latch on to the tourists because all the Scots folk in the bar have moved as far away as possible.

    In an ideal world, whisky is a drink to be shared in company - an opportunity to talk leisurely with friends about things of common interest, including the whisky itself, to listen to music & to tell stories, to share memories, & laughter & an occasional melancholy tear. Maybe you're settled in, before the fire, in a dimly lit room at home; maybe you're in a wee bar, with the noise of chatter & occasional laughter as a backdrop. If you were trapped by Ralfy, you'd be subjected to an endless dull monolgue from him full of all his opinions.

    For example - one time, when I was back in Edinburgh, I was settled in at the Bow Bar one afternoon, on Victoria Street. Three older blokes were sitting next to me. Clearly they'd been to a funeral - turned out, they were janitors at the Uni, & I happened to know the bloke who'd passed away, from my time as a graduate student. So, we got talking, I joined them, & then we started buying rounds of whiskies from the selection of over 250 behind the bar. We shared stories of working at the Uni, of Iain White (who has designed many of the best bars in Edinburgh, including the Bow Bar), of different beers, of whisky (each of us buying a round of our favourite for the group), & of our hopes & fears for the future.

    The whisky was a central part of the whole experience, but it was the companionship, the specialness of the moment, that was partly made possible by the whisky, that I remember the most.
    Last edited by per anporth; 2 Weeks Ago at 10:13 AM.

  5. #730
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Fantastic - I had to look up "bothy", "bunnet" & "couthy" to make sure I had the meaning right. To a lesser extent there is a Yorkshireman equivalent where I'm from.
    Ian

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    Moderator Poisoned Youth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    Fantastic - I had to look up "bothy", "bunnet" & "couthy" to make sure I had the meaning right. To a lesser extent there is a Yorkshireman equivalent where I'm from.
    I had to look up couthy and tartan lol.
    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    for me, it starts with the whole "in the bothy" schtick, & the bunnet.
    Thank you for the reply and insight. I think "enthusiasts" like myself (not unlike music collecting) tend to want to analyze, which is the appeal of watching whisky reviews (at least for me anyway), even though the premise is somewhat played out. I tend to gravitate towards the reviews that provide some insight or are "fun" as opposed to someone nosing for 5 minutes so they can convince the world their golden nostrils can pick up a "wee whiff of lavender after adding 2 drops of water" or "the faint taste of ripe loquat during the finish".

    I have watched various Ralfy videos and learned a bit, but he's spent a lot more time in recent years spending a fair amount of the time ranting during his reviews. One one hand, you can get some useful insight (or at least his perspective on it), but a little goes a long way. At this point he comes off a bit like a miserable old sod.
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  7. #732
    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    Fantastic - I had to look up "bothy", "bunnet" & "couthy" to make sure I had the meaning right. To a lesser extent there is a Yorkshireman equivalent where I'm from.
    Hah! - isn't there just, though?!! - Exhibit #1: "Sir" Geoffrey Boycott.
    "When I were a lad..."

  8. #733
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    At this point he comes off a bit like a miserable old sod.
    Our Scots word for this is "dour" - etymology: "originally Scots, probably from Scottish Gaelic dúr = dull, obstinate, stupid"

  9. #734
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    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    Fantastic - I had to look up "bothy", "bunnet" & "couthy" to make sure I had the meaning right. To a lesser extent there is a Yorkshireman equivalent where I'm from.
    Bothy, couthy & bunnets, I knews of (though I'll confess I had to look up the second one, coz I'd forgotten) , but then again I spent a few months in the later 80's up there when my parents lived in Edimburg for five years (mainly visiting them in August and X-mas time), and my dad being invited (as Honrary Consul) to official dinners. If the tartans seems like folklore (sold in ssouvenir shops), one better screw around with it, though; because it was serious honour business for some.

    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    I have watched various Ralfy videos and learned a bit, but he's spent a lot more time in recent years spending a fair amount of the time ranting during his reviews. One one hand, you can get some useful insight (or at least his perspective on it), but a little goes a long way. At this point he comes off a bit like a miserable old sod.
    never really had the patience for his reviews, which took huge meanders to say something he could've said in less than a minute

    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    Our Scots word for this is "dour" - etymology: "originally Scots, probably from Scottish Gaelic dúr = dull, obstinate, stupid"
    lmao.gif rotflmao.gif

    Somehow I can see another Scot called Jethro Anderson heading this way, but having to create a new word for him: Túr = "Tull"
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  10. #735
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    I never read reviews or watch videos. If I see a scotch that sounds appealing and is in my price range, I take a shot. Prices here so exorbitant that I rarely buy more than 2 or 3 per year.
    "Corn Flakes pissed in. You ranted. Mission accomplished. Thread closed."

    -Cozy 3:16-

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    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    Fantastic - I had to look up "bothy", "bunnet" & "couthy" to make sure I had the meaning right. To a lesser extent there is a Yorkshireman equivalent where I'm from.
    LOL! I haven't watched the videos that have set per anporth off, but the guy sounds like a right bawbag! (There's another one to look up)

    I think the English equivalent would be characters from Viz comic - The Real Ale Twats! Old beardy arseholes who bore everyone within earshot with their opinions (in this case about beer) and are probably keen Morris Dancing enthusiasts

  12. #737
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    I love Viz.
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  13. #738
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    As I said above, I find Ralfy entertaining. Well worth spending a few minutes watching his videos.

    And though I've only found them lately, he doesn't tick the loud Scot stereotype box.
    "If you want to see the true nature of humanity, just look at the internet."

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  14. #739
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevie B View Post

    I think the English equivalent would be characters from Viz comic - The Real Ale Twats! Old beardy arseholes who bore everyone within earshot with their opinions (in this case about beer) and are probably keen Morris Dancing enthusiasts
    Doesn't sound like Viz would like the sentiments expressed in this song, then.

    Their loss.

    "If you want to see the true nature of humanity, just look at the internet."

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  15. #740
    Blimey!! - Topsham Rugby Club, where this was filmed, is around 3 miles from my front door. PE doesn't tend to come so close!

  16. #741
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevie B View Post
    LOL! I haven't watched the videos that have set per anporth off, but the guy sounds like a right bawbag!
    Bawbag lol!

    Okay, here is one for you locals. How often do you actually use the word “dram” in your drinking experience?

    In the USA, at a bar we would typically say either “I’ll have a shot of Macallan” or “I’ll have Macallan neat (or on the rocks)”.
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  17. #742
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    Bawbag lol!

    Okay, here is one for you locals. How often do you actually use the word “dram” in your drinking experience?

    In the USA, at a bar we would typically say either “I’ll have a shot of Macallan” or “I’ll have Macallan neat (or on the rocks)”.
    I'd use dram in conversation (eg, with a guest at home: "Will you take a dram?") - but rarely at a bar. I'd never ask for a shot (in the UK, that's now reserved for things like Jaegermeister). I'd also never ask for whisky neat - if I'm ordering a malt, the presumption would always be that it would be served "neat". In older Scottish bars, there's often a wee brass tap on the bar, for water. This is the tap on the bar at Bennets, one of the real classic late 19th century bars in Edinburgh:

    IMG_0169.jpg

    From my own experience, at a bar, one would simply ask for the type of whisky - eg "A Mortlach 15, please". (In Scotland, standard measures are 35ml; in Engand, 25ml).

  18. #743
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    Bawbag lol!

    Okay, here is one for you locals. How often do you actually use the word “dram” in your drinking experience?

    In the USA, at a bar we would typically say either “I’ll have a shot of Macallan” or “I’ll have Macallan neat (or on the rocks)”.
    I've tried to make it automatic with my whisky buddies, ever since being reminded of it in the PE 2.0 PM thread

    In Benelux bars, I've drawn perplexity almost everywhere, except in Irish or English pubs when taking a strong Scottish accent like: " Hey, mate, can I have a wee dram of your Morangie? ". They usually get it and ask me if I'm from the east or west coast.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  19. #744
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    I've tried to make it automatic with my whisky buddies, ever since being reminded of it in the PE 2.0 PM thread

    In Benelux bars, I've drawn perplexity almost everywhere, except in Irish or English pubs when taking a strong Scottish accent like: " Hey, mate, can I have a wee dram of your Morangie? ". They usually get it and ask me if I'm from the east or west coast.
    What are your preferred Benelux bars, Trane - first & foremost as bars, but also for beer & for whisky?

    When I was in Brussels over the summer, I was staying in Saint Gilles, a couple of doors down from L'Porteuse d'Eau, which is a beautiful Art Nouveau corner bar, in a similar style to Le Cirio & Falstaff. Just up the road, both Le Verschueren & Moeder Lambic Original were fine; as was Le Dillens, also nearby.

    In Amsterdam, there are so many, but I am particularly fond of t'Smalle, in the Jordaan...

  20. #745
    En passant ...

    There is a Gaelic word, sgrìob, which has a very precise meaning.

    Imagine yourself in perfect company, settled in. The craic is good, the fire is crackling in the grate, Stramash are playing on the stereo system, & your host pulls out a bottle of 21 year old Springbank, the glen cairn glasses, & starts talking about how he came to the whisky whilst pouring into the glasses. You're watching, listening, catching traces of the scents of the whisky, & become aware of your anticipation for the drinking. How does this anticipation manifest itself?

    With a wee tingle, a slight expectant itchiness, in your lips.

    This tingle, this itch of anticipation, is sgrìob.

    I would like to think that there might also be a word that evokes that wee pause, when you bring the first pint to your lips - & stop momentarily, partly in anticipation, partly in a sort of respect - for the beer, its look, its scent, the surrounds - the moment...

  21. #746
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    I tossed back a few ounces of Balvenie 15 last night for Neil. I usually just drink beer on a Friday night but Neil deserved something finer.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  22. #747
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    What are your preferred Benelux bars, Trane - first & foremost as bars, but also for beer & for whisky?

    When I was in Brussels over the summer, I was staying in Saint Gilles, a couple of doors down from L'Porteuse d'Eau, which is a beautiful Art Nouveau corner bar, in a similar style to Le Cirio & Falstaff. Just up the road, both Le Verschueren & Moeder Lambic Original were fine; as was Le Dillens, also nearby.
    For Brussels, you named the most spectacular ones, the ones you'll find in tourist guides, along with those on the Grand Place.
    I never thought of looking up their spirits propositions, though. The ones downtown are filled with tourists, so few of the locals frequent them, especially since most of the hyper-ultra-center has been made pedestrian-only.

    The ones you named in St Gilles are more authentic (but not really as spectucular)
    I was last night in St Gilles at Le Café des Spores (not "sports") on Chaussée d'Alsembregh where they could mushrooms at every course, including deserts (spores >> mushroom, get it?). The slightly Art Deco place is inside an early-XXth C. hardware store with all the original shelves still . Not as superb as the other La Quincaillerie , which is totally art-nouveau

    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    En passant ...

    There is a Gaelic word, sgrìob, which has a very precise meaning.

    Imagine yourself in perfect company
    , settled in.
    my perfect company could be wearing a kilt (with nothing under) is she wish, but she doesn't have to know a darn thing about single malts
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  23. #748
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    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    En passant ...

    There is a Gaelic word, sgrìob, which has a very precise meaning.

    Imagine yourself in perfect company, settled in. The craic is good, the fire is crackling in the grate, Stramash are playing on the stereo system, & your host pulls out a bottle of 21 year old Springbank, the glen cairn glasses, & starts talking about how he came to the whisky whilst pouring into the glasses. You're watching, listening, catching traces of the scents of the whisky, & become aware of your anticipation for the drinking. How does this anticipation manifest itself?

    With a wee tingle, a slight expectant itchiness, in your lips.

    This tingle, this itch of anticipation, is sgrìob.

    I would like to think that there might also be a word that evokes that wee pause, when you bring the first pint to your lips - & stop momentarily, partly in anticipation, partly in a sort of respect - for the beer, its look, its scent, the surrounds - the moment...
    I know exactly the feeling you describe and I'm not surprised the Celts have a word for it - sgrìob - I've never heard of it, and of course just from looking at it I have no idea how to pronounce it! I've never heard of the band Stramash either...but that's another good Scottish word. If any of you don't know...you know that bit you sometimes get in football (i.e. soccer) where the ball is pinging about in the penalty area and defenders are throwing themselves in the way of the ball to block it and attackers are desperately trying to score? That's a stramash!

    As for ordering whisky...no-one I know would ask for a dram or a shot. I would just ask for a Macallan or a Laphroaig or whatever. If you just ask for a whisky you'll get a blend - Famous Grouse or the like. At home if you're offering someone a drink you might ask them if they "fancy a dram".

  24. #749
    "As for ordering whisky...no-one I know would ask for a dram or a shot. I would just ask for a Macallan or a Laphroaig or whatever. If you just ask for a whisky you'll get a blend - Famous Grouse or the like. At home if you're offering someone a drink you might ask them if they "fancy a dram"."

    Yep - exactly this, Stevie.

    By the way, here's The Bletherer by Stramash;

    And this is Louis's First Gig:


    I was privileged to have Colin Steele play this very song, not as Stramash, but leading a trio, at my 50th birthday.

  25. #750
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    I tossed back a few ounces of Balvenie 15 last night for Neil. I usually just drink beer on a Friday night but Neil deserved something finer.
    I had a special bottle of The Macallan that I went to. The guy very much understood the magic of this stuff. So I savored it as he would.

    Exit the warrior...

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