Thread: Birders

  1. #51
    NEARfest Officer Emeritus Nearfest2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Digital_Man View Post
    Yep. Apparently it's because they are not citizens of Canada. Seriously. This is the explanation I heard.
    That's completely untrue. And birds aren't citizens. They're inhabitants.

    "In 1758, the Swedish taxonomist Carl Linnaeus included the Canada goose in the 10th edition of Systema Naturae, which classified animals, plants, and minerals.

    But Linnaeus, writing in Latin, didn’t use the term 'Canada goose' in the 10th edition. He referred to the bird as Anas canadensis, a protonym, or early version, of the now-accepted scientific name, Branta canadensis, or 'black goose of Canada.'"

    Quote Originally Posted by Digital_Man View Post
    So I'm wondering why the american robin is still called that. Is it a citizen? A bit trivial I suppose but interesting anyway how some get their names. I suppose most people just call it a robin.
    From what I hear, there is a lot of politics that does into the naming and classification of birds. However, there is also a lot of science. Advancements in genetics has made ornithologist go back and reclassify birds. For example, observations of interbreeding between the Baltimore Oriole and the Bullock's Oriole led to both being classified as a single species, called the Northern Oriole from 1973-1995. Research later showed that the two birds actually did not interbreed significantly, so the Baltimore Oriole and Bullock's Oriole were both brought back into the taxonomy.
    Chad

  2. #52
    Member adap2it's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Digital_Man View Post


    Yep. Apparently it's because they are not citizens of Canada. Seriously. This is the explanation I heard. So I'm wondering why the american robin is still called that. Is it a citizen? A bit trivial I suppose but interesting anyway how some get their names. I suppose most people just call it a robin.
    That's because the Robin is generally accepted to be the British Robin, much like the "OPEN" in golf.
    Dave Sr.

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  3. #53
    NEARfest Officer Emeritus Nearfest2's Avatar
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    There is the American Robin and the European Robin. The AMRO is named after the EURO due to the orange breast, but they are not related birds. AMRO is a thrush and EURO is an Old World flycatcher. They are each commonly called just "robin" by the local population. Additionally, outside of vagrants, their territories do not overlap, so there is little need to qualify which type of robin it is, unless you are reporting your sightings to an organization like Cornell Lab (i.e. eBird, etc.).
    Chad

  4. #54
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    The American Robin has a more gamey flavor.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    The American Robin has a more gamey flavor.
    Chad

  6. #56
    Occipital Provocatee Plasmatopia's Avatar
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    "...the Swedish taxonomist Carl Linnaeus..."

    The original Flower King.
    Just sitting at home rocking back and forth and jealously caressing my invisible collection of theoretical assets.

  7. #57
    Casanova TCC's Avatar
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    Hi!.
    I`m an "extremely casual" birder too!.

    Come to Costa Rica, be my guest Chad/friends!.
    I`m going to share a couple of videos, some information and ... who knows!.

    Bird Photography Workshop - Costa Rica (With Wildlife Photographer Glenn Bartley)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRnh8P5m3Ks (8:47)

    An extension:
    Costa Rica - A Photographic Expedition
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWaH9pVnMs4 (7:48)

    One of many good specialized sites that you may find:
    http://www.birdwatchingcostarica.com/


    Enjoy!.
    Last edited by TCC; 03-20-2017 at 07:45 PM.
    Pura Vida!.

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  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Nearfest2 View Post
    From what I hear, there is a lot of politics that does into the naming and classification of birds. However, there is also a lot of science. Advancements in genetics has made ornithologist go back and reclassify birds. For example, observations of interbreeding between the Baltimore Oriole and the Bullock's Oriole led to both being classified as a single species, called the Northern Oriole from 1973-1995. Research later showed that the two birds actually did not interbreed significantly, so the Baltimore Oriole and Bullock's Oriole were both brought back into the taxonomy.
    I have thrown up my hands in frustration in ever understanding the psychology, politics and whatever that goes into taxonomy and “scientific names.” To switch over to my former life as an aquarist; when I started out, the vast majority of the cichlid family seemed to fit into two genera: Aequidens and Cichlasoma. Now, it seems that every species belongs to a unique genus.
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  9. #59
    Member Digital_Man's Avatar
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    [That's completely untrue. And birds aren't citizens. They're inhabitants.]

    Yeah, I didn't think so. Yes, I know they aren't and can't be "citizens" and I always thought it was a dubious explanation at best anyway.

  10. #60
    facetious maximus Yves's Avatar
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    I'm a casual birder. I like to track them down in various city parks or whenever I can get out to the country somewhere. My enthusiasm has waned a little because I am finding that my 75-300 lens just isn't strong enough to take me to the next level; amd I'm not willing to spend a boatload of money on a stronger one. I'm also more a fan of a point and shoot approach as opposed to setting up somewhere with a tripod and camouflage gear etc...

    Spring is returning and I will be out again, even if it's to see the same 15-20 species I have already photographed many times. You can always get a better shot!
    "Corn Flakes pissed in. You ranted. Mission accomplished. Thread closed."

    -Cozy 3:16-

  11. #61
    NEARfest Officer Emeritus Nearfest2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TCC View Post
    Hi!.
    I`m an "extremely casual" birder too!.

    Come to Costa Rica, be my guest Chad/friends!.
    I`m going to share a couple of videos, some information and ... who knows!.

    Bird Photography Workshop - Costa Rica (With Wildlife Photographer Glenn Bartley)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRnh8P5m3Ks (8:47)

    An extension:
    Costa Rica - A Photographic Expedition
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWaH9pVnMs4 (7:48)

    One of many good specialized sites that you may find:
    http://www.birdwatchingcostarica.com/


    Enjoy!.
    Wow! We are looking to go to Costa Rica next spring (2018). Any and all advice is welcome!!!
    Chad

  12. #62
    NEARfest Officer Emeritus Nearfest2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yves View Post
    Spring is returning and I will be out again, even if it's to see the same 15-20 species I have already photographed many times. You can always get a better shot!
    Keep your eyes peeled, buddy. Get yourself some warblers!
    Chad

  13. #63
    Jefferson James
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    This is the kind of madness I deal with on a daily basis. My front yard looks like a hillybilly bar -- peanut shells everywhere. I'm considering them fill at this point, a soil amendment.

    I really do wish we had cardinals out here; these Steller's jays are like the blue spray-painted version, all graffiti'd out.

    Western Grey Squirrel appears courtesy of Warner Bros., LTD.

    Like my home demos, my home movies suck, too, but the intent is there. There needs to be a "crop out finger" app.


  14. #64
    facetious maximus Yves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nearfest2 View Post
    Keep your eyes peeled, buddy. Get yourself some warblers!
    Yes, I've gotten a few of them over the years. A little too early up here though..
    "Corn Flakes pissed in. You ranted. Mission accomplished. Thread closed."

    -Cozy 3:16-

  15. #65

  16. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by Nearfest2 View Post
    There is the American Robin and the European Robin. The AMRO is named after the EURO due to the orange breast, but they are not related birds. AMRO is a thrush and EURO is an Old World flycatcher. They are each commonly called just "robin" by the local population. Additionally, outside of vagrants, their territories do not overlap, so there is little need to qualify which type of robin it is, unless you are reporting your sightings to an organization like Cornell Lab (i.e. eBird, etc.).
    The American robin is larger and can carry a coconut easier that a European robin or European swallow...
    "Alienated-so alien I go!"

  17. #67
    NEARfest Officer Emeritus Nearfest2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yves View Post
    Yes, I've gotten a few of them over the years. A little too early up here though..
    Oh for sure. We've had a few Pine Warblers, which are the the first ones through anyway (with the Pine Warblers), but it's even early for them.
    Chad

  18. #68
    NEARfest Officer Emeritus Nearfest2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave (in MA) View Post
    I saw this article. What a dopey photograph. Teeny binoculars and one of the straps is in front of one of the lenses. *head slap*
    Chad

  19. #69
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    I shot this at the local zoo.
    Wow.

    Most zoos don't ALLOW hunting!

  20. #70
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Beautiful bird, the Norwegian Blue.

    Yesterday I was driving down the road and a bald eagle swooped down on the car in front of me (which happened to contain my wife). Majestic bird, maybe a 6 foot wingspan. I was afraid he would carry off my wife's car!

    Couple years ago I caught a bluejay feasting on berries in the sun, in my front yard. They had started to ferment and he was drunk as a skunk. I picked him up (he let me; he couldn't even STAND up, let alone fly) and I put him in a pet carrier overnight. The next morning he'd sobered up and skedaddled as soon as I let him out. With a good story to tell his grandkids.
    Last edited by rcarlberg; 03-21-2017 at 03:04 PM.

  21. #71
    Boo! walt's Avatar
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    On two occasions over the last couple of years i've seen red-tailed hawks swoop and seize squirrels on the grounds of my co-op.More often i've seen hawks eating birds.Squirrels are probably a difficult quarry to dispatch,being quick, decent sized and alert.Seeing the hawk taking a squirrel was one of the more arresting sights in nature.

    Nature red in tooth and claw....indeed.
    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

  22. #72
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nearfest2 View Post
    I saw this article. What a dopey photograph. Teeny binoculars and one of the straps is in front of one of the lenses. *head slap*
    Since birds sing, hipster-boy thought he should use opera glasses.

  23. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Wow.

    Most zoos don't ALLOW hunting!
    They were delicious with a touch of shrimpiness to them. Delectable.
    The White Zone is for loading and unloading only. If you got to load or unload go to the White Zone.

  24. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by walt View Post
    On two occasions over the last couple of years i've seen red-tailed hawks swoop and seize squirrels on the grounds of my co-op.More often i've seen hawks eating birds.Squirrels are probably a difficult quarry to dispatch,being quick, decent sized and alert.Seeing the hawk taking a squirrel was one of the more arresting sights in nature.
    If you have a backyard bird feeder, expect to attract sharp-shinned hawks (and their bigger brothers, Cooper’s hawks). Their main food is smaller birds. There’s a few videos on Youtube of sharp-shinned hawks capturing, killing and eating birds (invasive pests like starlings and English sparrows, no big loss).

    Unfortunately before the days of dash-mounted car cameras but I saw the most amazing sight on the way back home from Sacramento via the river road (160): an osprey flying by with a fish in its talons. It dropped it right in front of my car and another swooped in and caught it in mid-air!

    The other amazing bird sight I actually did manage to get a photo series of: during a (curtailed) hike out to Tomales Point, a raven caught and flew off with a garter snake. I need to find those photos.
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  25. #75
    Member Dave the Brave's Avatar
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    One fine day a couple of years back I was outside my office building feeding the backy habit and a Peregrine Falcon swooped down right in front of me and scooped up a pigeon.

    Fine sight to see.


    DtB

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