Thread: Synthesizer Gear Porn ;-)

  1. #1
    Member hFx's Avatar
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    Synthesizer Gear Porn ;-)

    Below a really nice demo of one of the most exclusive new synthesizers on the market!
    Most of us can just dream of this USD 20.000 monster!



    If you dig the analog (mainly) polyphonic synthesizers of the 70s and 80s, do check out the other videos on the youtube channel of this guy - well produced, great audio and nice compositions in Vangelis/Jarre style. His studio is a veritable museum!!

    http://www.youtube.com/user/MrFirechild/videos
    My Progressive Workshop at http://soundcloud.com/hfxx

  2. #2
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Jean-Michaell Jarre in a box!

  3. #3
    Member hFx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    Jean-Michaell Jarre in a box!
    ...at about the same price as buying the man himself in a transport box
    My Progressive Workshop at http://soundcloud.com/hfxx

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    Sweet! But even if I had the money, I would be overwhelmed by that many knobs.

  5. #5
    There is no such thing as to many knobs on a synthesizer:

    Look from 1:48

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by hFx View Post
    Below a really nice demo of one of the most exclusive new synthesizers on the market!
    Most of us can just dream of this USD 20.000 monster!



    If you dig the analog (mainly) polyphonic synthesizers of the 70s and 80s, do check out the other videos on the youtube channel of this guy - well produced, great audio and nice compositions in Vangelis/Jarre style. His studio is a veritable museum!!

    http://www.youtube.com/user/MrFirechild/videos
    I really need to robb a bank.

    I don't think I'll do. But if I had the money, I sure would be interested, supposing it is equiped with midi.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    There is no such thing as to many knobs on a synthesizer:
    Don't get me wrong--I love listening to knobby synths in the hands of a skilled programmer. I'm just not at that stage yet.

  8. #8
    Is it actually in production yet? I've seen vids of this thing on the expo circuit for a few years but never actually come across one for sale.

    If I *did* have that sort of disposable income though...honestly I'd probably just go for a genuine/restored Yamaha CS-80. I have the Arturia equivalent and it's peachy but not quite the same tactile experience.
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Soc Prof View Post
    Don't get me wrong--I love listening to knobby synths in the hands of a skilled programmer. I'm just not at that stage yet.
    Less knobs often mean more things to operate with one knob, making creating sounds more difficult. I rather have one knob for each function, so you can hear what each knob does.
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    Is it actually in production yet? I've seen vids of this thing on the expo circuit for a few years but never actually come across one for sale.

    If I *did* have that sort of disposable income though...honestly I'd probably just go for a genuine/restored Yamaha CS-80. I have the Arturia equivalent and it's peachy but not quite the same tactile experience.
    I'm not sure. This synth seems to have more possibilities.
    I like the Arturia software, though nothing probably beats the real thing.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    Less knobs often mean more things to operate with one knob, making creating sounds more difficult. I rather have one knob for each function, so you can hear what each knob does.

    I'm not sure. This synth seems to have more possibilities.
    I like the Arturia software, though nothing probably beats the real thing.
    You're right, the Schmidt does have a far larger suite of possibilities.

    The thing I'm really wanting at this point is less the engine than the tactile experience. I actually bought the tiny little Yamaha Reface CS and even with it's limited capabilities I find it much more intuitive/playable than the Arturia. I see the CS-80 with it's slew of sliders and that gorgeous little ribbon, and that distinct multifilter sound and....ooooooooh yeah
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    You're right, the Schmidt does have a far larger suite of possibilities.

    The thing I'm really wanting at this point is less the engine than the tactile experience. I actually bought the tiny little Yamaha Reface CS and even with it's limited capabilities I find it much more intuitive/playable than the Arturia. I see the CS-80 with it's slew of sliders and that gorgeous little ribbon, and that distinct multifilter sound and....ooooooooh yeah
    In a way you are right, though with a midi-keyboard with knobs and sliders, you can program the Arturia software, to respond to those, which is quite easy. The experience is one thing, the space, hastle and money is something else.

  12. #12
    I've yet to find a MIDI controller with enough sliders to accommodate the full set of controls...but that's just preference on my part. To each their own
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  13. #13
    Member hFx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    I've yet to find a MIDI controller with enough sliders to accommodate the full set of controls...but that's just preference on my part. To each their own
    Previously, I used the (discontinued) M-Audio Keystation 88-Pro, which has plenty of assignable knobs, buttons, sliders and pedal jacks. Now, my Prophet-12 doubles as an excellent MIDI controller
    My Progressive Workshop at http://soundcloud.com/hfxx

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    I've yet to find a MIDI controller with enough sliders to accommodate the full set of controls...but that's just preference on my part. To each their own
    Well, I don't think mine has, but well I have to work within the limitations I have. If I would have the money, of course I would love to have a real studio, with real instruments, preferably with midi, but since that is just a dream, I have to work within the limitations of the Arturia software and my midi-keyboard with 9 sliders and 24 knobs.

  15. #15
    Of course, I do understand that. I'm simply being idealistic.

    And that 88 Pro does look pretty swanky...the closest I've seen yet!
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by hFx View Post
    Previously, I used the (discontinued) M-Audio Keystation 88-Pro, which has plenty of assignable knobs, buttons, sliders and pedal jacks. Now, my Prophet-12 doubles as an excellent MIDI controller
    That's the one I have. Now, if it would have polyphonic aftertouch, it would be perfect.

  17. #17
    I snagged one of these lovelies for the polyphonic aftertouch as well as general-purpose expressive whackness:

    http://www.rogerlinndesign.com/linnstrument.html

    Took some time to get used to the layout (it is closer to a guitar fretboard than a piano), but once I got the hang of it, it's fantastically versatile. I actually use it mostly with the Arturia CS-80, with the Y-axis controlling the cutoff and a full 12 note bend range. It's not perfect but is damned cool.
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    I snagged one of these lovelies for the polyphonic aftertouch as well as general-purpose expressive whackness:

    http://www.rogerlinndesign.com/linnstrument.html

    Took some time to get used to the layout (it is closer to a guitar fretboard than a piano), but once I got the hang of it, it's fantastically versatile. I actually use it mostly with the Arturia CS-80, with the Y-axis controlling the cutoff and a full 12 note bend range. It's not perfect but is damned cool.
    Interesting, but to expensive and I'm to much used to keyboards.
    Saw this in some documentary on synthesizers. Alas to much house and dance orientated. When I heard Roger Linn on his invention, I thought, he should have been talking to Don Buchla https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Buchla https://buchla.com/history/

  19. #19
    I'm guessing you mean the documentary "I Dream of Wires?" It definitely favors certain schools of thought above others, but I still enjoy it for what it is.

    The Buchla devices are absolutely sublime, but exceptionally expensive even for individual components. I wanted that "west coast" synthesis mindset, but instead went with a series of Eurorack modules that do similar things but at a lesser cost. I'd love to own a genuine Buchla Music Easels but...$5k is just a little hard to justify.

    I've exchanged a few emails with Roger Linn (mostly around the Linnstrument) and he's a great dude.
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    Less knobs often mean more things to operate with one knob, making creating sounds more difficult. I rather have one knob for each function, so you can hear what each knob does.
    I would respectfully disagree. More knobs could also mean a lot more functions! I would love a real Minimoog instead of my Arturia software. It is (or nearly is) one knob per function, but is a simpler synth than the Schmidt. Hence, fewer knobs.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    I'm guessing you mean the documentary "I Dream of Wires?" It definitely favors certain schools of thought above others, but I still enjoy it for what it is.

    The Buchla devices are absolutely sublime, but exceptionally expensive even for individual components. I wanted that "west coast" synthesis mindset, but instead went with a series of Eurorack modules that do similar things but at a lesser cost. I'd love to own a genuine Buchla Music Easels but...$5k is just a little hard to justify.

    I've exchanged a few emails with Roger Linn (mostly around the Linnstrument) and he's a great dude.
    No it was a Dutch documentary. It had some interesting stuff, like a bit of Rick Wakeman, but there was a whole lot more I missed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Soc Prof View Post
    I would respectfully disagree. More knobs could also mean a lot more functions! I would love a real Minimoog instead of my Arturia software. It is (or nearly is) one knob per function, but is a simpler synth than the Schmidt. Hence, fewer knobs.
    But more functions is better, because it means more possibilities. And yes, a real Mini Moog would be better, though the Arturia software offers some extra possibilities, like polyphony and more ways to control the sound in real-time.

  22. #22
    Amusingly enough, I have a Moog Voyager, along with the various CV breakout boxes to let it be semi-modular...and it still has a menu system to access certain types of modulation/routings I know that wasn't the case with the "true" Mini. Even some of my Eurorack stuff (which is technically totally modular) has "hidden" modes that allow certain knobs or buttons to change their purpose.

    I see both sides...having nearly everything as a tactile/dedicated physical control is wonderful. I've also really appreciated some of the more complex "outlier" possibilities that I could coax from these sorts of "under the hood" items, as well as the extended capabilities like polyphony in the Arturia software (I remember the first time I pulled up their Mini software and played a chord by accident, and did a total Keanu Reeves-style "whoa!").

    From a 100% idealistic perspective (i.e. not arguing that manufacturers should do this, or anyone else would appreciate it), what I'd love would be more "USB dummy" controllers like what Korg did initially with their MS-20 emulation, by including an actual mini-sized physical device. It is such fun interacting with software yet still using patch cables
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  23. #23
    Member BobM's Avatar
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    You shouldn't think that many knobs are daunting. Give yourself a month playing with it and you'll have it down.
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  24. #24
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    ^^Also, many of the knobs are duplicates. Any synth with 2 oscillators will have 1 set of knobs for 1 oscillator, and another identical set of knobs for the other oscillator which do exactly the same thing. Same thing for envelope and filter knobs. It's like looking at a 48 channel mixer. It looks very daunting until one considers there's only one narrow strip of knobs and switches. That strip merely repeats 48 times for each channel.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    ^^Also, many of the knobs are duplicates. Any synth with 2 oscillators will have 1 set of knobs for 1 oscillator, and another identical set of knobs for the other oscillator which do exactly the same thing. Same thing for envelope and filter knobs. It's like looking at a 48 channel mixer. It looks very daunting until one considers there's only one narrow strip of knobs and switches. That strip merely repeats 48 times for each channel.
    Yeah, so what? I want to control each oscilator, each enveloppe generator and each filter seperatly, just like I would do wich each channel of a mixer. All channels may be the same, but if I want to bring down the volume of one channel, I still need seperate knobs.

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