Thread: Synthesizer Gear Porn ;-)

  1. #26
    I have a Slim Phatty which recycles the knobs...it gets the job done, but it isn't my preference by any stretch. I also like being able to look across a synth surface and see how things are set (which is harder to do when a knob is recycled for multiple purposes).

    So...I do prefer the dedicated knobs myself.
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  2. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    I have a Slim Phatty which recycles the knobs...it gets the job done, but it isn't my preference by any stretch. I also like being able to look across a synth surface and see how things are set (which is harder to do when a knob is recycled for multiple purposes).

    So...I do prefer the dedicated knobs myself.
    I completly agree. My first synthesizer had one knob for each function and the latest one has something like 6 knobs for all functions. Things would be easier if I had an editor for it.

  3. #28
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Mesa, Arizona
    Posts
    941
    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    Yeah, so what? I want to control each oscilator, each enveloppe generator and each filter seperatly, just like I would do wich each channel of a mixer. All channels may be the same, but if I want to bring down the volume of one channel, I still need seperate knobs.
    I'm speaking in terms of knowing what each control does. If one knows what the coarse tune knob on one oscillator does, one automatically knows what the coarse tune does on the other oscillator. They do the same thing. Likewise, if one knows what the midrange center frequency knob does on one channel of a mixer, one automatically knows what that knob does on the other 47 channels. If a mixer has 25 controls for each channel, times 48 channels, that's a total of 1,200 controls. But one doesn't have to learn what 1,200 distinct controls do, one only has to learn what 25 distinct controls do. Knowledge of those 25 controls transfers to the next channel over, and the next, and so on.
    Last edited by progmatist; 01-13-2017 at 12:50 PM.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  4. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    I'm speaking in terms of knowing what each control does. If one knows what the coarse tune knob on one oscillator does, one automatically knows what the coarse tune does on the other oscillator. They do the same thing. Likewise, if one knows what the midrange center frequency knob does on one channel of a mixer, one automatically knows what that knob does on the other 47 channels. If a mixer has 25 controls for each channel, times 48 channels, that's a total of 1,200 controls. But one doesn't have to learn what 1,200 distinct controls do, one only has to learn what 25 distinct controls do. Knowledge of those 25 controls transfers to the next channel over, and the next, and so on.
    Now I understand. It is just more knobs doesn't make it more complicated.

  5. #30
    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Southwest
    Posts
    909
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    I snagged one of these lovelies for the polyphonic aftertouch as well as general-purpose expressive whackness:

    http://www.rogerlinndesign.com/linnstrument.html

    Took some time to get used to the layout (it is closer to a guitar fretboard than a piano), but once I got the hang of it, it's fantastically versatile. I actually use it mostly with the Arturia CS-80, with the Y-axis controlling the cutoff and a full 12 note bend range. It's not perfect but is damned cool.
    Wow, that looks fascinating! I have a stack of stuff and try to keep up with new things but i missed this. I look forward to looking at the demos.

  6. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotron View Post
    Wow, that looks fascinating! I have a stack of stuff and try to keep up with new things but i missed this. I look forward to looking at the demos.
    I discovered it via an online article about new MPE (multidimensional polyphonic expression) controllers, and it was both one of the more affordable and also intriguing. I've only just scratched the surface of mine; for example, I've not nearly explored all the polyphonic aftertouch possibilities. But I loved that it pushed me out of my "comfort" zone and thinking about performing in a different manner.

    He actually released a newer model that is smaller and less expensive...probably one of the easiest entry points into alternative MIDI/USB controllers on the market these days
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  7. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    Now I understand. It is just more knobs doesn't make it more complicated.
    This German company once made a DX-Programmer for Yamaha’s DX-line of synths. It was basically just this big board full of knobs!

    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    If I *did* have that sort of disposable income though...honestly I'd probably just go for a genuine/restored Yamaha CS-80. I have the Arturia equivalent and it's peachy but not quite the same tactile experience.
    The CS-80 is probably the most beloved synth of its era, perhaps of all time. I still remember that Garth Hudson loved his so much he had it tricked out with a liquid cooling system (like gamers are fond of modding their PCs with these days) to make it more reliable and road-worthy.

    Still, a little love for Korg’s patchbay-laden “space heater” synth:

    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  8. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    This German company once made a DX-Programmer for Yamaha’s DX-line of synths. It was basically just this big board full of knobs!



    The CS-80 is probably the most beloved synth of its era, perhaps of all time. I still remember that Garth Hudson loved his so much he had it tricked out with a liquid cooling system (like gamers are fond of modding their PCs with these days) to make it more reliable and road-worthy.
    I think it was the smaller brother of the GX1 Keith Emerson used.
    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    Still, a little love for Korg’s patchbay-laden “space heater” synth:

    Dorothea Raukes (Streetmark) used one. Her solo-album Deutsche Wertarbeit is just Korg.

  9. #34
    Member hFx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    385
    Some CS-80 (and some other classic keys) from the same guy that made the demo of his new Schmidt...

    My Progressive Workshop at http://soundcloud.com/hfxx

  10. #35
    Not gonna lie...pants go a little funny-feeling, seeing those synths in action.
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  11. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    Dorothea Raukes (Streetmark) used one. Her solo-album Deutsche Wertarbeit is just Korg.
    The Japanese band Shingetsu used one on their 1979 debut LP. It gets a good workout on their album-opening epic “Oni”:



    The biggest hit to feature the Korg was probably “I Go Crazy” by Paul Davis, it’s the source of the harp-like recurring hook in the chorus:



    And the song also features CS-80 on the intro!
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  12. #37
    I have a Contemporary Keyboard magazine from November 1979, which features Joe and Gino Vannelli on the front cover with some Korg polyfonic synthesizers on the background. I think I can also see a MS20 on top, but I'm not sure of that.

  13. #38
    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Southwest
    Posts
    909
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    I discovered it via an online article about new MPE (multidimensional polyphonic expression) controllers, and it was both one of the more affordable and also intriguing. I've only just scratched the surface of mine; for example, I've not nearly explored all the polyphonic aftertouch possibilities. But I loved that it pushed me out of my "comfort" zone and thinking about performing in a different manner.

    He actually released a newer model that is smaller and less expensive...probably one of the easiest entry points into alternative MIDI/USB controllers on the market these days
    I am saving up for the big one.
    It would never replace my traditional keyboard controllers because of my classical repertoire. But for delivering realistic performances of strings and woodwinds, it would be the cat's meow. As well, any "synthy" sound would be great on it.

  14. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotron View Post
    I am saving up for the big one.
    It would never replace my traditional keyboard controllers because of my classical repertoire. But for delivering realistic performances of strings and woodwinds, it would be the cat's meow. As well, any "synthy" sound would be great on it.
    Awesomesauce...I hope you're able to get one soon, and enjoy it as much as I have thus far
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  15. #40
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    3,390
    ELP's 'Pirates' on CS80

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPdA3JnQRiU

    The best CS-80 I know is Eddie Jobson on UK's first album.

  16. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    ELP's 'Pirates' on CS80

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPdA3JnQRiU

    The best CS-80 I know is Eddie Jobson on UK's first album.
    I've read an interview in which he stated it was more trustworthy than the Prophet 5.

  17. #42
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    3,390
    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    I've read an interview in which he stated it was more trustworthy than the Prophet 5.
    At least it has fantastic sounds


  18. #43
    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Southwest
    Posts
    909
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    Awesomesauce...I hope you're able to get one soon, and enjoy it as much as I have thus far
    Thank you, John!

    So what other boards/modules does the Battema battery include?

  19. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotron View Post
    Thank you, John!

    So what other boards/modules does the Battema battery include?
    Me? Oh crap...let's see:

    Hardware:

    Alesis QS-8 (for my main piano/controller, although I sometimes use an onboard sound or two)
    Roland XP-30, JV-880, U-220, MKS-50, Fantom X6
    Korg MS2000 (also have a Karma gathering dust in a closet)
    Moog Voyager plus various CV breakout boxes, with effects from Moogerfoogers Clusterflux, Ring Modulator, FreqBox, and Midi Murf. Plus Minifooger overdrive and delay.
    Moog Minitaur
    Moog Slim Phatty
    Moog Werkstatt
    Hammond XM-2

    I also have various weirdo devices that I've picked up over the years like a Tocante Karper (killer for crazy drones), Bastl MicroGranny (pocket granular sampler), a Kaoscillator and a few of the Teenage Engineering Pocket Operators. Oh! And to try and get just a LITTLE of that CS-80 love I have the new Yamaha Reface CS

    Finally, I have my beastly pride and joy: a Eurorack modular built around a MakeNoise B+G shared system. In truth, that's where I spent much of my time these days...just wiring various shiat up and seeing what comes out the other side. I'm fascinated by the possibilities, especially exploring stuff like what Subotnick did with the old Buchla systems.

    Here are a couple of shots (the studio shot is a year old...I've just replaced the old mixer with a Presonus and retired the Roland U-20 after over 25 years of wonderful service ).

    20160702_082513.jpg20161211_215720.jpg
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  20. #45
    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Southwest
    Posts
    909
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    Me? Oh crap...let's see:

    Hardware:

    Alesis QS-8 (for my main piano/controller, although I sometimes use an onboard sound or two)
    Roland XP-30, JV-880, U-220, MKS-50, Fantom X6
    Korg MS2000 (also have a Karma gathering dust in a closet)
    Moog Voyager plus various CV breakout boxes, with effects from Moogerfoogers Clusterflux, Ring Modulator, FreqBox, and Midi Murf. Plus Minifooger overdrive and delay.
    Moog Minitaur
    Moog Slim Phatty
    Moog Werkstatt
    Hammond XM-2

    I also have various weirdo devices that I've picked up over the years like a Tocante Karper (killer for crazy drones), Bastl MicroGranny (pocket granular sampler), a Kaoscillator and a few of the Teenage Engineering Pocket Operators. Oh! And to try and get just a LITTLE of that CS-80 love I have the new Yamaha Reface CS

    Finally, I have my beastly pride and joy: a Eurorack modular built around a MakeNoise B+G shared system. In truth, that's where I spent much of my time these days...just wiring various shiat up and seeing what comes out the other side. I'm fascinated by the possibilities, especially exploring stuff like what Subotnick did with the old Buchla systems.

    Here are a couple of shots (the studio shot is a year old...I've just replaced the old mixer with a Presonus and retired the Roland U-20 after over 25 years of wonderful service ).

    20160702_082513.jpg20161211_215720.jpg
    Thank you for the list and the pics! It looks like a great collection and a very workable studio. You have a great Moog presence there! But the Karma just gathers dust? I really enjoy mine; I like the Karma features on it and my M3.

  21. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotron View Post
    Thank you for the list and the pics! It looks like a great collection and a very workable studio. You have a great Moog presence there! But the Karma just gathers dust? I really enjoy mine; I like the Karma features on it and my M3.
    The Karma is a great keyboard and I used it lots over the years. But, I also have a number of software synths (the V-Collection, Spectrasonics Omnisphere/Atmosphere, M-Tron, Dimension Pro, Rapture, some Native Instruments), and I gradually realized that I was getting the same sounds from the software devices, using the Karma less and less. So, to free up some space I decided to move that into the closet.

    As far as spare bedroom studios go, I'm pretty happy with mine
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  22. #47
    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Southwest
    Posts
    909
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    The Karma is a great keyboard and I used it lots over the years. But, I also have a number of software synths (the V-Collection, Spectrasonics Omnisphere/Atmosphere, M-Tron, Dimension Pro, Rapture, some Native Instruments), and I gradually realized that I was getting the same sounds from the software devices, using the Karma less and less. So, to free up some space I decided to move that into the closet.

    As far as spare bedroom studios go, I'm pretty happy with mine
    Gotcha. I have not dipped into the virtual side of things yet.

  23. #48
    With a decent machine and some reasonable CPU power, you can do some remarkable stuff with software synths. I find they are replacing the more sample-based hardware devices I use, save for some very specific sounds that resonate with me (especially some of the core sounds in devices like the U-220 and JV-880). A package like Spectrasonics Omnisphere can rival the best, most lush textures from the hardware devices like a Fantom or Karma.

    That's part of the reason I've gravitated toward hardware devices that are more specialized, more analog, like the Moog and the Eurorack stuff. If I can get the lush digital sounds in my computer, I want the more tactile/interactive feel of the actual machines
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

  24. #49
    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Southwest
    Posts
    909
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    With a decent machine and some reasonable CPU power, you can do some remarkable stuff with software synths. I find they are replacing the more sample-based hardware devices I use, save for some very specific sounds that resonate with me (especially some of the core sounds in devices like the U-220 and JV-880). A package like Spectrasonics Omnisphere can rival the best, most lush textures from the hardware devices like a Fantom or Karma.

    That's part of the reason I've gravitated toward hardware devices that are more specialized, more analog, like the Moog and the Eurorack stuff. If I can get the lush digital sounds in my computer, I want the more tactile/interactive feel of the actual machines
    That is an excellent approach. And as stated by others, there is nothing like having a synth with lots of knobs and/or patch cords. I started on an ARP 2600 so I have a soft spot for patching together a sound.

  25. #50
    Awesome!! See, I started during the "dark ages" for synths...my first was the Roland U-20, which was about as far from the "one knob/button/fader per function" as you could get. It wasn't Yamaha DX-7 levels of buried complexity, but definitely wasn't exactly the most intuitive device either

    The other nice thing about the softies is for quick sketchpad-type work. Even if the initial sounds are 100% exact, I can bang out a track fairly quickly in broad strokes, then work backwards to flesh things out with more "specific" sounds as needed. For example, I will ultimately track leads with the Voyager but for quick work I can use the virtual Minimoog and have something laid down in a few minutes. That way, I spend the creative part of the process being creative, and the production/sound-design part of the process can come later on. If that makes sense
    Ephemeral Sun - because I gotta do something about these boxes of CDs in the basement: http://www.ephemeralsun.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •