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Thread: Jan Hammer - The First Seven Days

  1. #1

    Jan Hammer - The First Seven Days

    Threw this in the car for the first since since buying it a couple of years ago. At the time, it just seemed ok. Fast fwd to now, HOLY MOLY! Its bloody gorgeous. Esp
    the first 3 track"Darkness/Earth in Search of a Sun"(which i knew from The Jeff Beck Live album),"Light/Sun" and"Oceans and Continents". And I just love the artwork.
    Any fans!!!!

  2. #2
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    But I'm a fanboy of most of his tunes up to and including Black Sheep.
    Who else in the world have succesfully worked with sounds like this, and check out the solo !



    His a strange musician. From classical over mahavishnu, to his funny mix of pop and hardcore fusion... excellent - and then at last came money with Miami Vice Great for him, but not for his fans.
    I dont know if its fair to blame an artist, but except a few great guest appearances (like John Abercrombie: Night), everything after the album Hammer was at best average or musically insignificant.

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    Member FrippWire's Avatar
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    I am a big Jan Hammer fan in general and love "The First Seven Days" in particular. I tend to buy anything with his name on it. As alluded to above, his work veers from some of the most killer synth based fusion to overtly commercial stuff like "Miami Vice". For example his rock collabs with the likes of Neal Schon and James "JY" Young (Styx) bring mixed results -- when they're good, they're real good and when they're not, they verge on cheesy. His collabs with Jeff Beck and John Abercrombie's "Timeless" are must owns.

  4. #4
    I like it. It's never exactly blown me away, but it's definitely my favorite JH solo album. I'll give it a fresh spin soon, maybe I'll have a reaction like yours.

    Bill

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    Member dropforge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by progman1975 View Post
    Threw this in the car for the first since since buying it a couple of years ago. At the time, it just seemed ok. Fast fwd to now, HOLY MOLY! Its bloody gorgeous. Esp
    the first 3 track"Darkness/Earth in Search of a Sun"(which i knew from The Jeff Beck Live album),"Light/Sun" and"Oceans and Continents". And I just love the artwork.
    Any fans!!!!
    One of my favorite albums, from any genre. But I'm a Janboy. I mean a fanboy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    His a strange musician. From classical over mahavishnu, to his funny mix of pop and hardcore fusion... excellent - and then at last came money with Miami Vice Great for him, but not for his fans.
    I dont know if its fair to blame an artist, but except a few great guest appearances (like John Abercrombie: Night), everything after the album Hammer was at best average or musically insignificant.
    Jan's also on Tony Williams' The Joy of Flying, which I'm sure you have. I also like the two Schon/Hammer albums (which have around six fine instrumentals scattered across them).

    I disagree strongly where Jan's film and tele-scoring is concerned. I love his Miami Vice work. The guy craps out melodies other musicians wished they chanced upon in a rainforest. Jan's album Snapshots covers more ground of the sort out of MV. There's a lot of unreleased stuff, too.

    I'll be the first guy to say Drive sucked. Not sure what happened there, but he's only human.
    Last edited by dropforge; 12-02-2016 at 09:29 PM.

  6. #6
    Member No Pride's Avatar
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    Great album; love it!

    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    His a strange musician. From classical over mahavishnu, to his funny mix of pop and hardcore fusion... excellent - and then at last came money with Miami Vice
    And before Mahavishnu, he was working as a straight ahead jazz pianist. He played with Elvin Jones and was Sarah Vaughan's pianist for a while, among other things.

    His first 3 albums (Like Children, The First 7 Days and Oh, Yeah) are killer!

  7. #7
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    He was originally trained as classical piano player.
    I have always loved his attack on the piano - and ditto moog/oberheim sound.

    Taste differs, I dont feel anything (positive) listening to his stuff after Miami Vice.

    This old one is new to me, do you know it?
    https://www.discogs.com/Olaf-K%C3%BC...elease/6912093

    He is/was also a great drummer. On the albums with David Earle, Love devotion surrender or this funny reggae tune with Tommy Bolin where he also played Hammond on this . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_x_7XYGmng Also great Hammond work with Fania All Stars.

  8. #8
    I've always enjoyed this recording.. As someone already mentioned Like Children is wonderful as well..

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    I enjoy his playing in John Abercrombie's Timeless, which is arguably one of the hardest-hitting albums ever coming from ECM (together with some Rypdal, of course).

  10. #10
    He is defenitly a talented musician. I own his work with Mahavishnu, The first seven days, Like children and Oh yeah. I think I like his Miami vice stuff, at least what I heard of it.

  11. #11
    What about my member? rottersclub's Avatar
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    I've always enjoyed this one. My only criticism is that although he was considered a trained drummer back in the day, I never particularly liked his drumming style, so that detracts a bit on First Seven Days. (I have the same criticism of Jaco Pastorius' drumming as well.)

    The duet album with Goodman isn't as strong, but it is worth hearing. He lost me with Oh Yeah?, but I also liked his work with John Abercrombie and Charlie Mariano.
    Think of a book as a vase, and a movie as the stained-glass window that the filmmaker has made out of the pieces after hes smashed it with a hammer.
    -- Russell Banks (paraphrased)

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