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Thread: Phil Collins - His Legacy and Contribution to Prog

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    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    Phil Collins - His Legacy and Contribution to Prog

    Let's restart this discussion in a positive light

    I entered into Genesis post-Lamb so for a while I thought Phil was the only singer they ever had. I thought Phil's touch on the skins was marvelous, light but not without power and certainly the ability to turn on a dime without losing the momentum.

    So what do you think Phil gave us in the golden era (and perhaps his work with Brand X as well)?
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

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    He is my hands-down favorite of the "big" drummers.
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    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    He WAS brilliant.

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    Two Words:
    Nuclear Burn

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    Member gearHed289's Avatar
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    Loved his drumming with Genesis and Brand X. Also a very emotive vocalist. Like a lot of prog-heads, I did not like the direction he started taking with his solo albums and Genesis, but he did what he wanted to do. And LOTS of it (costing relationships along the way). I'm thinking of picking up his new autobiography.

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    When I saw the thread my first thought was I wonder how long it will take Rufus to appear. 25 minutes. He surpassed himself! There's another one I'm expecting to make an appearance too.

    I like Phil's work in bands/solo up to and including the early 90s. Great drummer, great singer. The difference he made to Genesis from the moment he joined is astonishing.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    He is my hands-down favorite of the "big" drummers.
    +1. Fantastic talent.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    So what do you think Phil gave us in the golden era (and perhaps his work with Brand X as well)?
    I thought Phil was a fantastic drummer with Genesis and Brand X, and was a very good singer on the first couple of Genesis albums. That's where the "golden era" ends for me. I don't particularly care for the Genesis albums after W&W, but I think Phil remained a good singer, and perhaps even got better. The drumming got simpler, but he could still play well. But I think he was fantastic early on, particularly as a drummer.

    Bill

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by battema View Post
    He is my hands-down favorite of the "big" drummers.
    Same here.

    While I didn't care for some of his solo stuff, there was still a fair bit I enjoyed. His contributions to Genesis, and music in general, were truly great.

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    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Phil McCracken.

    Love the guy. Earned every cent he's made over the years. A huge contributor to music in many genres, not just prog. Nothing but admiration for the chap.

  11. #11
    I joined the Genesis 'train' in 1973, just in time for Live! Actually preferred Phil as a vocalist to Peter; and unsurpassed as a prog drummer IMO.

  12. #12
    Phil Collins's contributions to Prog are his work are his work with Genesis (especially the albums for 1971 through 1977) as a drummer, lead singer (and background singer in the Peter Gabriel era), and co-writer (or arranger) on the band's great songs. Also, can't forget his drumming on Robert Fripp's Exposure, Peter Gabriel's "Third Album" & Brian Eno's Another Green World & Before And After Science. Truly one of the greats.

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    Ordinary Idiot Captain Geech's Avatar
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    I think the moment I was most impressed by Phil, was when I saw his name in the credits of those Brian Eno albums. And again when I saw Genesis live on the We Can't Dance tour, Phil had masterful control over the stadium. And the 'drum duet' with Chester was outstanding.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sputnik View Post
    I thought Phil was a fantastic drummer with Genesis and Brand X, and was a very good singer on the first couple of Genesis albums. That's where the "golden era" ends for me. I don't particularly care for the Genesis albums after W&W, but I think Phil remained a good singer, and perhaps even got better. The drumming got simpler, but he could still play well. But I think he was fantastic early on, particularly as a drummer.

    Bill
    Pretty much my sentiment also. I do think that Phil improved greatly as a singer as the genesis material got much simpler and less interesting.


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  15. #15
    Oh, it warms my heart to see the positive sentiments regarding Phil. One of my regular rants concerns the greatness (and progginess) of Phil-fronted Genesis.

    I dig his voice and drumming, of course, but I'll add that he brought a wonderful humour and his own kind of theatricality (different from Peter's) to the stage. His interactions with the audience, facial expressions, and theatrical bits (as on I Know What I Like, I Can't Dance) were fantastic.

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    Member itserik's Avatar
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    Seriously gifted drummer. I wouldn't enjoy Genesis albums half as much without his signature drumming. Loved his emotive vocals too - few are better. He gets a bad wrap by some here. Crazy.

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    Member Firth's Avatar
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    Phil Collins - His Legacy and Contribution to Prog

    Ok enough Philgasms. His greatness in drums with Genesis and BrandX is unsurpassed and that's why his transformation to drum machines and noise gated drums is so devasting. It's primarily the reason why ABACAB and the following Genesis albums are weak. It's unfortunate that Calling All Stations didn't use as much as Nick DiVirgilio as they should have.
    [They] agreed that it was neither possible nor necessary to educate people who never questioned anything.

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    Even on the later Genesis albums, Phil's drumming is still quite exceptional - for example on Land of Confusion, his kick follows the pattern 2,4,1,3 - I dont know if I'm describing this right, but its 2 kicks, 4 kicks, 1 kick, 3 kicks all thru the song. I have only heard one drummer play it right and when I asked, he said it was a real challenge to learn to play that right.
    I got nothin'

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    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    I remember Phil's account of sitting in with The Musical Box for an encore. He thought it'd be easy enough. Then he listened to whatever song it was while trying to play along at home. He said he learned two things quickly. First, he was out of shape and second, he was pretty damn good when he was young.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  20. #20
    Brand X!!!! Fusion, not prog. Phil's legacy for me begins and ends here.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Firth View Post
    His greatness in drums with Genesis and BrandX is unsurpassed.
    I disagree, yet I respect Phil C.'s 70s drumming work as much as the next guy. His best jobs were with Eno, Martyn and on that Peter Banks solo record, IMO. His drum input with Gene was good too.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
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    Best ever drummer. Kept Genesis going when PG left. First 3 solo albums were really good - then went too socio-political
    Last edited by Sean; 09-23-2016 at 03:09 PM.

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    I disagree, yet I respect Phil C.'s 70s drumming work as much as the next guy. His best jobs were with Eno, Martyn and on that Peter Banks solo record, IMO. His drum input with Gene was good too.
    I'd addd Argent's Counterpoints to the list. Not their best album but the drumming is phenomenal, especially since he was called in at the last minute when their drummer fell ill.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Yodelgoat View Post
    Even on the later Genesis albums, Phil's drumming is still quite exceptional - for example on Land of Confusion, his kick follows the pattern 2,4,1,3 - I dont know if I'm describing this right, but its 2 kicks, 4 kicks, 1 kick, 3 kicks all thru the song. I have only heard one drummer play it right and when I asked, he said it was a real challenge to learn to play that right.
    speaking of Phil's bass drum playing, Chester told me that Phil's bass drum foot was faster than his own!

  25. #25
    Member Phlakaton's Avatar
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    A musical drummer with a lot of feel. One of my favorites in the early & mid 70s. He was damn good on Miami Vice too!

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