Thread: The Damn I'm Old Thread - Putting Up With Being a Geezer

  1. #2001
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adap2it View Post
    It's also very important to keep your sitting to a minimum. This IS a major factor in the ageing process.
    That is so right, Dave. My paternal grandfather was very active. He lived to be 95 and said that he moved too fast for death to catch up to him. Eventually death took a shortcut and beat him to the finish line.
    Lou

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  2. #2002
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    I can't remember if I have asked this before or not, so if I have I apologize, but curious if anyone here has had knee replacement surgery? Did it work for you and what kind of recovery time was it?
    Steve, my wife had a knee replacement - and is (probably) about to have the other one replaced. I can't speak to her recovery time because she had complications (7 procedures in 9 months!!)

    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    ...Needed plenty of physical therapy and daily trips to the gym to get it where it needed to be post surgery but 100% worth it from my perspective.
    ^^This.

    My wife found that a lot of the exercises they told her to do did NOT help at all. But riding a stationary bike was a huge help - so we bought one.

    Also - it's very important that you flex your knee as much as possible in the early days after surgery. Scar tissue forms very quickly, which will restrict your movements for ever. You need to get more than 110-degrees of flex, which will never happen if scar tissue forms.

    My wife's case was a bit extreme - but due to the complications, she could not flex after surgery. Scar tissue formed, and she ended up with about 30 degrees of flex - which is barely enough to walk. So she needed another procedure to break the scar tissue, then for a week she was in bed with her knee in a flexing machine that ensured the scar tissue could not re-form in a way that further prevented her ability to bend the knee. She now has about 105-degrees.

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    ...Would you recommend doing them at the same time and getting it over with, or doing one at a time?
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Bad idea...
    ^^This. I agree - it's a VERY bad idea to have both done at once. I know a few people who did so and experienced very extended recoveries. I know others who did the 2nd replacement after the 1st had settled in, and they were fine.
    Regards,

    Duncan

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  3. #2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow View Post
    My neighbor had both his done at the same time. He said if he didn't he may not of had the other one done.
    That is what worries me.

  4. #2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by adap2it View Post
    Yer killing me :-)

  5. #2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    Steve, I had chronic back problems for years but bought a set up orthotics for my shoes. It completely took away the pain. I have no idea if this applies to you but it worked for me.
    I have flat feet that make my ankles turn out which I think has contributed to my knee issues, but my problems are mainly due to injuries I had when I was young. I tore the ACL and Meniscus in my right knee downhill skiing when I was 18. I had surgery on it then. Re-hab back then was not what it is today, and I was young and dumb and didn’t follow what the doctor told me to do anyway. When I was in my late 20’s I tore my ACL in my left knee playing volleyball at a party. I had arthroscopic surgery on that one. Over the years I have aggravated both original injuries several times. Today I have arthritis in both knees, and I have become bow legged in my right leg. I last saw my orthopedic guy about 2 years ago, and he basically told me that when the pain got bad enough that I couldn’t stand it anymore it would be time for surgery. I am getting close to that point. I have not tried injection therapy yet, so that may be the next step, but I surgery can’t be too far in my future.

  6. #2006
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    Thanks for all of the information folks. I appreciate it.

  7. #2007
    ALL ACCESS Gruno's Avatar
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    I've never encountered so many knee replacements in one place. Hmmmm....

  8. #2008
    Geriatric Anomaly progeezer's Avatar
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    My knees and hips are fine. Everything else however......
    "My choice early in life was either to be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politician, and to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference"

    President Harry S. Truman

  9. #2009
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    I have not tried injection therapy yet, so that may be the next step, but I surgery can’t be too far in my future.
    I had the injections for about 18 months and they worked well, after 18 months they stopped being effective and that what prompted surgery.

    I'm not put off having the other knee done based on the first one. Doing both together would have been much worse.
    Ian

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  10. #2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Bad idea.

    My mother had both knees done at the same time (against doctor's advice), and it made rehab so hard she never walked again.

    My dad had both knees redone at different times, and he was still climbing ladders to clean gutters at 90.
    No Orthopedist worth his/her salt would even consider replacing both hips simultaneously. The recovery and rehab would be nearly impossible.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  11. #2011
    Outraged bystander markwoll's Avatar
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    My wife is currently waiting for insurance clearance and scheduling for a knee replacement.
    She suddenly had severe knee pain, turns out it is a sooner rather than later thing.
    Just one side for now.
    Her father had both done at once. Didn't work out so well, had to have one re-done. He is more diligent with PT now. Never got back to more than hobbling.
    Her mom had one done 2 years ago and is doing fine. She plays golf and tennis like the commercials.
    My brother in law had his done and skimped on pain meds and ( sort of a result of that ) PT. Not doing so well after 4 years.
    I am not so bad off yet.
    No two of us are alike.
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  12. #2012
    Member adap2it's Avatar
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    Dave Sr.

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  13. #2013
    Occipital Provocatee Plasmatopia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gruno View Post
    I've never encountered so many knee replacements in one place. Hmmmm....
    Shouldn't be a big surprise since many here often don't have a leg to stand on.
    Just sitting at home rocking back and forth and jealously caressing my invisible collection of theoretical assets.

  14. #2014
    ALL ACCESS Gruno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plasmatopia View Post
    Shouldn't be a big surprise since many here often don't have a leg to stand on.

  15. #2015
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gruno View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Plasmatopia View Post
    Shouldn't be a big surprise since many here often don't have a leg to stand on.
    Yes, I got a kick out of it too.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  16. #2016
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    This is big, and it’s not just gravy https://www.fox5dc.com/news/cannabis...l-company-says
    “[They] agreed that it was neither possible nor necessary to educate people who never questioned anything.”

  17. #2017
    I'll put this up as many are about to go for more turkey and stuffing... Harvard biologist David Sinclair discussed NMN (vitamin B3 derivative that is similar to NR) on Joe Rogan's show twice this year to an audience of 1.5 million each time. Sinclair has been taking 1,000 mg a day for four year and his 80 year old father has been taking 500 mg a day for as long.

    NMN report #1 by a 59 year old man.

    dose: 750 mg a day - $4 a day
    time: 4 months

    * no negative side effects

    * lost 7 lbs. and waistline 2 inches smaller, more muscle

    * more energy, less fatigued when exercising

    * no pain in legs when walking as before

    * used to get leg cramps but now rare and less intense

    * can focus better, less stress

    * his wife reports he sleeps better without waking - it happens but is now rare

    * vision has improved: things would get blurry after 2 meters and now after closer to 5 meters


    Here is his 9 month report

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qu6x...6yL9fYZVdL_GCU
    Last edited by yamishogun; 6 Days Ago at 07:38 PM.

  18. #2018
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    [QUOTE=yamishogun;941961]I'll put this up as many are about to go for more turkey and stuffing... Harvard biologist David Sinclair discussed NMN (vitamin B3 derivative that is similar to NR).

    NMN report #1 by a 59 year old man.




    Apparently some real benefits of NMN, however there are concerns:
    https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...g-supplements/
    “[They] agreed that it was neither possible nor necessary to educate people who never questioned anything.”

  19. #2019
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Yamishogun is either a paid spokesman for NR or he's on so much of it that it's affected his objectivity. Don't believe everything you read -- and don't believe ANYTHING Yamishogun writes.

  20. #2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Yamishogun is either a paid spokesman for NR or he's on so much of it that it's affected his objectivity. Don't believe everything you read -- and don't believe ANYTHING Yamishogun writes.
    You are joking, correct? There are obvious benefits from NMN, and like anything the market will push it. However there are concerns about cancer. I am not surprised. Scientific American reported a long time ago that even eating and exercising more increases metabolic rate, and the product of metabolism is free radicals. We think we can reduce free radicals with antioxidants. But can we really? We certainly can smoke cigs, increase metabolism, and get cancer from free radicals damage, especially adding in sun exposure too. Now we know the endocannibinoid system fights cancer and is stimulated with cannabinoids. Maybe the answer is increasing metabolism and taking cannabinoids using nanotechnology.
    “[They] agreed that it was neither possible nor necessary to educate people who never questioned anything.”

  21. #2021
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    You are joking, correct? Back at ya.

  22. #2022
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Yamishogun is either a paid spokesman for NR or he's on so much of it that it's affected his objectivity. Don't believe everything you read -- and don't believe ANYTHING Yamishogun writes.
    Why would a paid spokesman for NR report on positive effects of NMN, a competing similar compound? I was criticized by an NR investment group this past spring for pointing out that a lead NR researcher remained silent on a podcast after the hosts said at the end of the inerview: "Wow! We didn't realize NMN was worthless, so we'll be taking NR!" Instead of remaining silent at that point, the researcher at the U of Iowa should have said: "Both NR and NMN raise NAD+, and we aren't sure of the differences yet."

    I didn't write anything myself but simply put one man's experience with NMN up with a link.
    Last edited by yamishogun; 6 Days Ago at 09:57 AM.

  23. #2023
    Quote Originally Posted by Firth;94199
    Apparently some real benefits of NMN, however there are concerns:
    [URL="https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/cancer-research-points-to-key-unknowns-about-popular-antiaging-supplements/"
    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/cancer-research-points-to-key-unknowns-about-popular-antiaging-supplements/[/URL]
    Three years ago, I went to hear Charles Brenner, the leading NR researcher who was quoted in the article, speak on NR to a roomful of biologists and me (open to the public but in a science lecture room). I was the last at the Q&A and asked him about the Washington - St. Louis study. He replied as he did in the article and didn't think there was a cancer risk. One of the authors of the "NAD+ boosting may accelerate existing cancer" article also said he didn't think there was an increased risk but was something to further research. I'll try to find the quote.
    Last edited by yamishogun; 6 Days Ago at 10:15 AM.

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